Skip to main content

Full text of "Records of the Indian command of General Sir Charles James Napier, G.C.B., comprising all his general orders, remarks on courts martial, etc. etc., with an appendix, containing reports of speeches, copies of letters, and notices of his public proceedings, extracted from contemporaneous prints"

See other formats


. RECORDS 

OF 

THE INDIAN COMMAND 

OF 

GENERAL SIR CHARLES JAMES NAPIER, Gr. C. B., 

COMPRISING 

ALL HIS GENERAL ORDERS, REMARKS ON 
COURTS MARTIAL, ETC. ETC., 

WITH 

AN APPENDIX, 

CONTAINING REPORTS OF SPEECHES, COPIES OP LETTERS, AND 
NOTICES OF HIS PUBLIC PROCEEDINGS, EXTRACTED 
FROM CONTEMPORANEOUS PRINTS. 



COMPILED BY 

JOHN MAWS ON, 

OF THE BENGAL HTJKKAEU OFFICE, AUTHOB OF "LOCAL SKETCHES," ETC. 



Calcutta: 

R. C. LEPAGE AND COMPANY, BRITISH LIBRARY. 
MDCCCLI. 



PREFACE. 



The compiler has endeavoured to form a com- 
plete chronicle of the public acts of Sir Charles 
Napier's administration as Commander-in-Chief in 
India. That administration has been rather judi- 
cial than martial. The conqueror of Scinde came 
to lead the Indian Army in the field ; he remained 
to attempt its reformation on the parade and in 
cantonments. The sword of war being sheathed, 
he laid his hand to that of justice. Hence this 
book contains no triumphant despatches telling of 
hard-won victories. It is filled chiefly with the re- 
cords of more than two hundred Court Martial trials 
which passed under His Excellency's supervision. 
Of miscellaneous notifications, including all that 
could be supposed to have emanated from the 
Commander-in-Chief personally, the number here 
collected does not exceed thirty. The appendix 
contains, embodied in extracts from contemporane- 
ous prints, some detached passages of the veteran's 
too brief Indian career. 



( 2 ) 



Many of the Court Martial trials have been 
passed by His Excellency with a bare notification 
of his approval and confirmation ; but even these 
it has not been deemed advisable to exclude from 
a work designed to illustrate an administration 
so thoroughly judicial in its character. They do not 
serve to display the old hero's strength of feeling 
and expression ; but they will help, in their place, 
to exemplify the manner in which he discharged 
the office of supreme military judge. 

In the short period, — not much exceeding a year 
and a half, — during which Sir Charles Napier Avas at 
the head of the Indian Army, fourteen officers of 
Her Majesty's regiments in India and thirty-six 
officers of the Bengal Military Service were 
tried by General Court Martial. Only one of 
the former and two of the latter were acquitted. 
Of those convicted, six Queen's officers and fifteen 
Company's officers were cashiered or dismissed. 
Two of the former and one of the latter were par- 
doned by the Commander-in-Chief. In the case of 
one Bengal officer, — Lieut. Robert Renny, 47th 
N. I. — Sir Charles refused the reprimand awarded 
by the Court, substituting a compliment in its place. 
In another case — that of the late Dr. Edward 
Edlin — he cancelled the sentence of suspension 
when about half its term had run. 

Of the six Queen's officers removed from the 
Army two owed their downfall to drink ; one was 



( 3 ) 



expelled for fraud and falsehood ; one for using in- 
sulting and abusive language to a brother officer ; 
one for neglect of duty ; and one for breaking his 
arrest and associating with private soldiers. Of 
the Company's officers who lost their commissions, 
two were removed for drunkenness ; seven for mis- 
conduct in money matters ; three for being con- 
cerned in a duel ; one for dishonest gambling ; one 
for an attempt at seduction ; and one for abuse of 
authority and disobedience of orders. 

Only eight European non-commissioned officers 
were brought to trial ; of these two were acquitted 
and two received pardon. 

As many as eighty European private soldiers 
were tried by General Court Martial, of whom ten 
were acquitted, one was pardoned, and in two cases 
the Commander-in-Chief annulled the proceedings 
by refusing his confirmation. Two men were each 
twice convicted and punished. In eighteen of the 
sixty-nine cases in which the sentence was con- 
firmed, the punishment was mitigated in a greater 
or less degree by His Excellency. 

Twenty-eight Native commissioned officers were 
tried, and twenty -five of them convicted. Of these 
three were pardoned ; ten were dismissed from the 
service ; four received a mitigated punishment ; and 
eight underwent the sentence awarded by the Court. 

Twelve Native non-commissioned officers were 
brought to trial, and only one of them acquitted. 



( 4 ) 



Of the eleven convicted, one was pardoned ; two 
escaped, from the proceedings not being confirmed ; 
three had their sentences mitigated ; and four were 
dismissed. 

Of Native private soldiers only twenty-three, 
exclusive of the mutineers of the 22nd and 66th 
Regiments, were tried by General Court Martial, 
and four of these were acquitted. Of the nine- 
teen convicted, only seven received the full measure 
of punishment awarded in the sentence. 

The compiler has condensed the records of the 
Courts Martial as much as was compatible with a 
clear and correct statement of the case; and he 
trusts that while thus getting rid of much un- 
necessary verbiage that would have given great 
bulk to a book, which even now has out-grown 
his calculations, he has facilitated the task of 
reference and perusal. It is only the charges 
and findings that he has thus cut down ; the recom- 
mendation of the Court, when any was offered, 
and the remarks of the Commander-in-Chief when 
any were appended, he has given as he found 
them in General Orders. No arrangement has 
been attempted ; the Court Martial and other 
notifications being given, generally, in chronological 
succession. The Index will, he trusts, render refer- 
ence to any particular case or order sufficiently 
easy. J. M. 

Calcutta, ~) 
24*A April, 1851- J 



GENERAL ORDERS 



BY HIS EXCELLENCY 

SIR CHARLES NAPIER, C.C.B., 

Commander in Chief in India. 
Assumption of the Command, 

ETC. ETC. ETC. 



By the Hon'ble the President of the Council 
of India in Council. 

Fort William, 1th May 1849. 

No. 178 of 1849.— His Excellency General Sir 
Charles James Napier, Knight Grand Cross of the 
most honorable Military Order of the Bath, having 
been appointed by the Honorable the Court of 
Directors, in their letter, in the Public Department, 
dated the 7th March 1849, to be Commander in 
Chief of the East India Company's forces in India, 
and also to be an Extraordinary Member of the 
Council of India, which appointments are to take 
effect upon, and from his assuming the command 
of Her Majesty's forces in the East Indies, and the 

B 



9 



said General Sir Charles James Napier, having now 
informed the Honorable the President in Council, 
that he assumed the command of Her Majesty's 
forces in the East Indies on this date, the Honora- 
ble Court's orders and the Commissions appointing 
General Sir Charles James Napier are now read. 

The oaths of office being administered to General 
Sir Charles James Napier, His Excellency takes 
his seat as a Member of the Council of India, under 
the usual salute from the ramparts of Fort William. 

Ordered, that the appointment of General Sir 
Charles James Napier be communicated to the 
army in General Orders, and that the Commission 
constituting His Excellency Commander in Chief be 
read, with the usual ceremonies, to the troops in 
garrison and at the different stations of the army. 

Ordered, that all returns of the army be made, 
in the usual manner, to General Sir Charles James 
Napier as Commander in Chief. 



The Honorable the East India Company. 

To all to whom these presents shall come, send greeting. 
Know ye, that we, the said Company, reposing especial 
trust and confidence in General Sir Charles James Napier, 
Knight Grand Cross of the most honorable Military Order 
of the Bath, do by these presents constitute and appoint 
him the said Sir Charles James Napier to be Commander in 
Chief of all our military forces, which now are or may here- 
after be employed in the East Indies, except such forces as 
are or shall be employed in our service within our fort and 



3 



garrison of Fort William in Bengal and the town of Cal- 
cutta, and in our fort and garrison of Fort St. George and 
town of Madraspatnam, and in our fort and garrison of 
Bombay, and except such forces, as shall from time to time 
be employed in our service within the respective Presiden- 
cies of Fort St. George and Bombay, or within any settle- 
ments or places subordinate thereto respectively, when he the 
said Sir Charles James Napier shall not be resident within 
such last mentioned Presidencies or places respectively, 
which office of Commander in Chief aforesaid the said Sir 
Charles James Napier is to take upon him, upon and from 
his assumption of the command of Her Majesty's forces in 
the East Indies, and to hold and enjoy the same during our 
pleasure, and until the contrary thereof shall be signified 
under our common seal, or under the hands of thirteen or 
more of our Court of Directors for the time being; and we do 
hereby authorize, empower and require him the said Sir 
Charles James Napier, as Commander in Chief aforesaid, 
to the utmost of his skill and power to do and perform all 
such offices and services as appertain to the post of Com- 
mander in Chief of all our military forces in the East 
Indies, except as aforesaid, subject to such removal or recal, 
as can or may be made by any Law now in force, and 
subject also to all such rules, orders and instructions as he 
shall from time to time receive from our Court of Directors 
in writing, under the hands of thirteen or more of them, or 
from the Governor General of India in Council, or from 
the Governor in Council of Fort St. George, or the Gover- 
nor in Council of Bombay, whensoever he shall be present 
at or within either of those Presidencies respectively, or at 
or within any settlements or places subordinate thereto, 
according to the rules and discipline of war, in pursuance 
of the trust hereby reposed in him ; and we do hereby 



4 



strictly require, charge and command all commissioned 
Officers, non-commissioned Officers, Soldiers and others 
belonging to our military forces in the several places before 
mentioned, except as aforesaid, to yield to him the said 
Sir Charles James Napier as their Commander in Chief 
due obedience accordingly, and we do hereby revoke and 
annul all and every former Commission or Commissions to 
any other person or persons whomsoever to act as Com- 
mander in Chief of our forces in the East Indies, from 
the time that this present Commission shall take effect. 
Given under our commpn seal, this nineteenth day of 
March, in the twelfth year of the reign of oar Sovereign 
Lady Victoria, by the Grace of God of the United King- 
dom of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen, Defender of 
the Faith, and in the year of our Lord one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-nine. 

By order of the Court of Directors of the said Company. 
(Signed) James C. Melvill, 

East India House; ^ Secretary. 
London, 24th March 1849. $ 

(A true copy,) 

(Signed) James C. Melvill, Secretary. 

(Signed) R. Wyllie, Major, 
Offg. Secy, to the Govt, of India, 
Mily. Dept. 



Order on Assuming- Command. 

1. Her Majesty having been graciously pleased 
to nominate General Sir Charles James Napier, 
G. C. B., to be Commander in Chief of all Her Ma- 
jesty's forces serving in the East Indies, and the 




5 



Honorable the Court of Directors having appointed 
him to the command of the Honorable Company's 
forces in India, from his assumption of the forego- 
ing appointment, he deems it right thus to an- 
nounce in General Orders, that he this day assumes 
the duties of his command, with the concurrence 
of His Honor the President in Council. 

2. General Sir Charles James Napier in thus 
assuming the command, in consequence of the Right 
Honorable Lord Gough's period of service having 
ended, cannot do so without directing that the 
honors hitherto paid to this distinguished Noble- 
man be continued to him by those armies at whose 
head he has gained so many victories. 

3. To the Queen's and Company's armies Sir 
Charles James Napier has only to express the pride 
he feels at once more serving with them, and the 
pleasure with which he heard on reaching the 
East, that at Goojerat they had added a fresh vic- 
tory to their annals, and a new conquest to our 
empire. 

4. All reports, returns, and correspondence re- 
lative to Her Majesty's and the Honorable Com- 
pany's forces, are to be sent to the heads of the 
various military departments, as usual. 

5. The Commander in Chief will proceed in a 
few days to join the army in the north, and will 
inform the Adjutant General of the Army when he 
leaves Calcutta, in order that any communication 



6 



of importance, requiring His Excellency's imme- 
diate decision, may be forwarded to meet him on 
the march. 

6. The Commander in Chief will receive the 
heads of departments, on public business, from 10 
to 12 o'clock A. M. any day of the week, Council 
days and Sundays excepted. 

7. His Excellency will be happy to receive all 
Officers and Gentlemen, who may wish to see him, 
on Mondays and Thursdays, from 12 until 2 o'clock. 

8. In cases of public emergency, the Commander 
in Chief may be seen on any day and at any hour. 

The Commander in Chief is pleased to make the 
following appointments on His Excellency's per- 
sonal Staff, from this date : 

Major J. P. Kennedy, Her Majesty's 25th foot, 
to be Military Secretary. 

Major W. C. E. Napier, Her Majesty's 25th foot, 
to be Aide-de-Camp. 

Major W. M. G. McMurdo, Her Majesty's 78th 
foot, to be Aide-de-Camp. 

Lieutenant E. D. Byng, 1st European Bengal 
fusiliers, to be Aide-de-Camp. 

Lieutenant Sir E. FitzG. Campbell, Bart., Her 
Majesty's 60th rifles, to be Aide-de-Cainp. 

Lieutenant Colonel G. T. 0. Napier, Her Majes- 
ty's Cape mounted rifles, to be extra Aide-de-Camp. 

Captain H. W. Bunbury, Her Majesty's 33rd 
foot, to be extra Aide-de-Camp. 



7 



Captain F. P. Harding, Her Majesty's 22nd foot, 
to be Persian Interpreter. 

Assistant Surgeon A. Gibbon, of the Bengal 
medical service, to be Surgeon. 

Courts Martial. 

Gunness Sing, Resuldar, IS th Irregular Cavalry. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Mhow, 18th April 
1849. 

Charge. — Conduct highly unbecoming a Native Officer. 
1st. — In having, in breach of positive orders from his 
commanding Officer, Captain Ryves, and to the great detri- 
ment of discipline, lent money on interest to men of the 
regiment ; 2nd. — In having, disrespectfully required that the 
permission given him by his commanding Officer to take 
exercise on horseback should be certified in writing;, insi- 
nuating that no dependance could be placed on the verbal 
permission given by Captain Ryves, through the Adjutant of 
the regiment; 3rd. — In having, conducted himself in a highly 
disrespectful manner to his commanding Officer Captain 
Ryves, by doubling his fist and using other violent gestures in 
his presence, and falsely asserting that Captain Ryves had 
released him from arrest, and afterwards denied having so 
released him, and publicly calling out, on leaving Captain 
Ryves' presence, that he had been illtreated by that Officer. 

Fin ding . — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for three months. 

Revised Sentence. — Dismissal from the Service. — Ap- 
proved and confirmed. 

Recommendation by the Court. — The Court, on account 
of the prisoner's length of service, beg to recommend him 



8 



to the favorable consideration of His Excellency the Com- 
mander in Chief. 

Gunness Sing will be struck off the strength of 
the 18th irregular cavalry, from the date on which 
this order may be published to the corps. — Meerut, 
10th June 1849. 

Private Thomas Walley, H. M. 60th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Wuzeerabad, 24th 
May 1849. 

Charge. — Murder of Sewraj Sing Sepoy, by rifle shot. 
Finding. — Not Guilty. 

Confirmed. — I cannot say approved, for I never 
read such inefficient proceedings in my life. 
Court, officiating Judge Advocate, and evidence, 
all inefficient ! The prisoner must return to his 
duty. — Head Quarters, 12th June 1849. 

Diaram Opediah, Jemadar, 2nd N. I., ( Grenadiers.) 
Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 28th May 
1849. 

Charge. — Giving false evidence before a Regimental 
Court Martial. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service, and forfeiture of 
arrears. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation of the Court. — The Court, having per- 
formed their unpleasant duty, do now beg most respectful- 
ly, on account of the Jemadar's long service and high stand- 
ing, and also on account of the many months he has been 
in confinement, to recommend him to the favorable consi- 
deration of the Commander in Chief. 



9 



Remarks by the Commander in Chief. — When 
an honorable soldier commits a military crime, not 
of a disgraceful nature, I always feel disposed to 
favor him ; and, in such a case, a Court Martial is 
sometimes justified in recommending such a man 
to mercy, and the Court's recommendation is then 
of great weight. But when an Officer perjures 
himself as a witness before a Court Martial, (as the 
Jemadar has been proved to have done) the Court ? 
which convicted him of this heinous offence, has no 
right whatever to recommend him to mercy ; to do 
so is to insult the army, and I reject their recom- 
mendation with the condemnation which it de- 
serves. — Umballah, 13th June 1849. 

Drill Sergeant John Stokes, 2nd Brigade Horse Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 11th June 
1849. 

Charge. — Having, at Umballah, on the 4th day of May 
1849, feloniously and unlawfully discharged a pistol, loaded 
with gunpowder and a metal bullet or other destructive 
substance, at Mrs. Caroline Brock, widow, with intent, then 
and there, and thereby feloniously, wilfully and of his 
malice aforethought, to kill and murder the said Caroline 
Brock. 

Finding. — Guilty of having discharged a pistol at Mrs. 
Caroline Brock • Not Guilty of the remainder of the charge. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment in the quarter guard for three 
months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation to Mercy. — In consideration of the pre- 
vious admirable character held by the prisoner, the Court 

C 



10 



beg most respectfully to recommend him strongly to the 
merciful consideration of His Excellency the Commander 
in Chief. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I have great pleasure in complying with 
the recommendation of the Court, as I cannot 
believe that a brave and good Soldier, as the pri- 
soner is said to be, could have intended to injure a 
woman. — Head Quarters, %\st June 1849. 



Sewram, Sepoy, 51 st JV. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Jullunder, 4th June 
1849. 

Charge. — Desertion from his regiment when on active 
service at Mooltan, and carrying off his arms and accou- 
trements. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for life. — Approved and con- 
firmed. — Head Quarters, 20th June 1849. 

Omrao Loll, Sepoy, 1th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Loodianah, 24th May 
1849. 

Charge. — Violently assaulting and severely wounding 
with a sword, Subadar Dhowkul Sing, his superior Officer. 
Finding. — Guilty. 
Sentence. — Transportation for life. 

To be revised. — The Court ought to have sen- 
tenced death for this attempt at assassination, as 
gross as ever attempt was. If the Court does not 
sentence capital punishment, the Members cannot 



11 



complain if they are some day made victims ! — 
12th June 1849. 

Revised Sentence. — Death by hanging. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Remarks. — The Court having passed a proper 
sentence upon the culprit, I will commute the 
capital punishment into that of imprisonment, with 
hard labor, for life ; and the prisoner is to be trans- 
ported beyond Sea for life, there to undergo his 
imprisonment.— -iifead Quarters, 27th June 1849. 



Previous Convictions. 

Head Quarters, JSimlah, Ath July 1849. 

The Commander in Chief has to call the atten- 
tion of Officers conducting the proceedings of 
Courts Martial to the provisions of the Articles of 
War, which require that it shall be first proved 
that the prisoner has been duly warned of the in- 
tention to produce evidence of previous convictions 
before any evidence whatever regarding them is 
received. This rule is violated when, as is now 
too commonly the case, the examination of the 
prosecutor or other Officer commences by inquiring, 
whether he has evidence to give regarding previous 
convictions. The proper questions are the follow- 
ing : the first is never to be omitted, and must 
precede all other questions invariably ; the second 
will be put or not according to the circumstances. 



12 



1st. Q. Has the prisoner been warned that his 
former convictions would be brought in evidence 
against him ? 

A. " Yes," or " there are no previous con- 
victions." 

2nd Q. State what you know upon the subject 
of former convictions against the prisoner ? 
A. 

Courts Martial. 

Private Robert Tredger, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 23rd May 
1849. 

Charge. — Insubordinate conduct. 

1st. In having, at Cawnpore, on the morning of the 
14th of April 1849, refused to mount guard on his ordinary 
turn, when a prisoner in the dry room. 

2nd. For having, when a prisoner in the dry room, on 
the evening of the 15th of April 1849, struck No. 1390, 
Private Denis Murley, of the same regiment, when on duty 
as sentry over the prisoners, and, at the same time and 
place, thrown a bolster or pillow at, and therewith struck, 
his superior Officer, No. 21 1, acting Sergeant Thomas Shaw, 
being in the execution of his office. 

3rd. For having, on the morning of the 17th April 1849, 
when brought before his commanding Officer Lieutenant 
Colonel G. Huish, C. B., at the orderly room of the regi- 
ment, declared to that Officer, that he would not soldier 
any longer, and that he might bring him to a Court Mar- 
tial, if he liked, and otherwise behaving disrespectfully in 
the presence of his commanding Officer. 

4th. For having, about the same time and place, when 
ordered back to the guard, snapped his fingers, with an air 



13 



of defiance, at Lieutenant Colonel G. Huish, C. B., his com- 
manding Officer, in the execution of his office ; such conduct 
being subversive of good order and military discipline. 

5th. For having, at Cawnpore, on the 1st of May 1849, 
disobeyed the lawful command of his superior Officer 2nd 
Lieutenant W. H. Forshall, of the same regiment, by whom 
he had been ordered to extinguish a pipe, which he, Private 
Tredger, was smoking in the dry room of the same regiment. 

6th. For having, at the same time and place, made use 
of obscene and disrespectful language to Lieutenant For- 
shall, the Subaltern Officer of the day, when in the execu- 
tion of his office. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year, with solitary con- 
finement for the first 14 days in the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th 
and 10th months of such imprisonment. 

To be revised. — Because the Court, by not re- 
ferring to the Mutiny Act, Section 13, has passed 
an erroneous sentence, which I have no power to 
confirm. There must be a lunar month of impri- 
sonment between every two periods of solitary 
confinement. — Cawnpore, 6th June 1849. 

Revised Sentence. — Imprisonment, for one year; and to 
be kept in solitary confinement for a lunar month of twenty- 
eight days, in the sixth, eighth and tenth months, respec- 
tively, of such imprisonment. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Cawnpore, 20th June 1849. 

Remarks. — The solitary confinement is limited 
to fourteen (14) days in the sixth, eighth and tenth 
months respectively. The sentence to have effect 
from 23rd May 1849. — Head Quarters, 27th June 
1849. 



11 



Private Owen McAteer, H. M. 29th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Ferozepore, 25th 
June 1849. 

Charges. — Being drunk in barracks ; and having twice 
struck his superior Officer, Corporal John Walker. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes and one year's imprisonment. — 
Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 6th June 1849. 



Payment of Transferred Men. 

Head Quarters, Simlah, 9th July 1849. 

1st. On the 8th February 1849, General Orders 
were issued relative to the march of the wounded 
men from Chilianwalla to Ferozepore. 

2nd. Among other attendants, four Lascars were 
ordered to be furnished by Her Majesty's 61st re- 
giment, and the commanding Officer paid them up 
to the day on which he made them over; viz. 10th 
February, and thought he had done with them. 

3rd. On the 10th May following, they rejoined 
the 61st regiment at Peshawur, and during that 
long period of a quarter of a year, these poor men 
had received no pay ! 

4th. The Commander in Chief will not here 
enter upon the discussion whether the Officer com- 
manding the 61st, or the medical Officer at Feroze- 
pore, was the proper person to pay these men, this 
discussion being one of an ordinal nature, and no 
blame attaches to either opinion, if the medical Offi- 
cer at Ferozepore, on their arrival, immediately 



15 



sought to remedy the error, which he does not ap- 
pear to have done. 

5th. But blame does attach to the Officer who 
received these four Lascars from the 61st regiment, 
and this calls for an order from the Commander in 
Chief, to inform Officers that it is their duty when 
receiving men from any other Department or Au- 
thority, to ascertain first, that such men are settled 
with up to the day on which such new Commander 
receives them ; and next, how they are to be sub- 
sisted while under his own orders. This is the rule 
in all armies, and Sir Charles Napier must insist on 
Officers paying strict attention to it. 

6th. After this warning, those who do not at- 
tend to it must take the consequences. In this 
instance four poor men, who have probably got 
families to support, have been kept out of their pay 
for a quarter of a year, while working hard for the 
public service ; and they must be still further kept 
out of it, for the Commander in Chief has no power 
to order them to be paid ; he must first make an 
application to the Governor General to authorize 
the payment to these men of their just pay. 

7th. All this arises, not from the error of the 
Officer commanding the 61st regiment, (if he was 
in error) but from the neglect of the Officer that 
received the four Lascars from the 61st, without 
ascertaining how they were to be paid while with 
him. 



in 



8th. The Commander in Chief hopes, that, in 
future, no Officer who marches with a detachment 
will fail first to ascertain how his men are to be 
subsisted. Lieutenant Colonel McLeod paid his 
Lascars up to the day he made them over to some 
Officer, and this Officer, who thus received them, 
was in fault, and has caused these four men to be 
many months without pay. The first duty of an 
Officer is to see that justice be done to his men. 



Courts Martial. 

Ensign William Henry Hanker/, 38th iV. /. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lucknow, 27th June 
1849. 

Charge. — Highly unbecoming conduct. 

First. In having, at Lucknow, on or about the 28th of 
February 1849, retained and fraudulently appropriated to 
his own use, the sum of 21 Rupees, sent by Captain W. 
J. B. Knyvett, of the same regiment, to Lieutenant J. 
J. Hockley, of the 66th regiment native infantry, with a 
note addressed to that Officer, which money and note had 
been taken by mistake to him, Ensign Hankey; he being- 
well aware at the time, that he had no such money to 
receive from Captain Knyvett; and secondly, in having, 
a few days subsequently, addressed to Captain Knyvett 
a receipt for the money, which he fraudulently signed 
" Hockly," without initials, and with some of the letters 
of the name written over to make it bear some resemblance 
to his own name, but so as to deceive Captain Knyvett 
into the belief that the money had duly reached its destina- 
tion, and with intent so to deceive him. 



17 



Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Recommendation. — The Court having performed a painful 
duty in awarding the only sentence in their estima- 
tion commensurate with the offence committed, beg to 
recommend the prisoner to the merciful consideration of 
His Excellency the Commander in Chief, as they think 
from his extreme youth and inexperience, he may have 
been unaware of the serious nature of the offence ; and in 
the hope that clemency may have a beneficial effect on his 
future conduct. 

Remarks. — On the 21st ultimo, I wrote some 
remarks on the recommendation to mercy made by 
a general Court Martial which tried Diaram Ope- 
diah, a Jemadar in the 2nd grenadiers. To those 
remarks I now refer the Officers who have recom- 
mended Ensign Hankey to mercy; a proceeding 
which does so little credit to the Court, that I can- 
not believe it to have been unanimously voted. 
What ! pardon and turn back among the Officers of 
the Indian army, a man convicted of felony! On 
what grounds does the majority of this Court cast 
upon the Commander in Chief the pain of refusing 
pardon ? On the grounds of youth ! Has he not been 
nearly a year and a half in the army? Has he not a 
commission? Is he not, by the rules of the service, 
deemed old enough to sit, and has he not sat as an 
Officer in judgment, and as a Magistrate to try and 
punish others ? Is he not old enough to be entrust- 
ed, and has he not been entrusted with the com- 

D 



18 



mand of men ? with a Subaltern's command in peace 
and in war ? and when men's lives and safety- 
depend upon the conduct of a Subaltern? Has not 
that glorious uniform, which he has disgraced by 
two infamous actions, sufficed, by its recognized 
honour, to introduce him into the best society, even 
into the presence of the Sovereign ? And would 
the majority of the Court wish me to leave it on 
the back of such a man as the prisoner ? Has he 
been tempted by misfortune and distress ! No ! He 
avows his wealth ; he has had the education of a 
gentleman ; his misconduct seems to be the result 
of innate moral turpitude ! Had the prisoner been 
horror struck at the enormity of his guilt, avowed 
his crime, and cast himself, repentant and consci- 
ence smitten, upon the mercy of the Court, I could 
have understood the feelings of those who recom- 
mended him to mercy. But such is not the case. 
On the contrary, while conscious of his guilt, he 
deliberately adds to his crime by the effrontery, 
the sophistry, and the falsehood of his defence ! To 
pardon such an offender would be an insult to the 
army, and I will not do it. — Head Quarters, 9 th 
July 1849. 

Abilock Sing, Havildar, 65th N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Benares, 8th June 
1849. 

Charge. — For having, at Benares, on the night of the 3rd 
of April 1849, when posted on duty at the residence of Her 



19 



Highness the Maharanee Jhunda Kour and her female 
attendants, being state prisoners, through great neglect and 
carelessness suffered one of such prisoners, named Hujjoo, 
to escape. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Reduction to the ranks, and six months im- 
prisonment. 

To be revised. — I think the sentence is inadequate 
to the crime. 

Revised Sentence. — Reduction to the ranks and impri- 
sonment with hard labor for one year. — Approved and con- 
firmed. 

Recommendation. — The Court unanimously and most 
respectfully beg to recommend the prisoner Havildar 
Abilock Sing, 65th Regiment Native Infantry, to the 
merciful consideration of His Excellency the Commander 
in Chief, in consideration of his former good character. 

Remarks. — In consequence of the recommenda- 
tion of the Court, I will remit the hard labor. — 
Head Quarters, 11th July 1849. 



Hunnooman Sing and Girwar Sing, Sepoys, 65 th JY. I. 
By the same Court Martial. 

Charge. — For having, at Benares, on the night of the 
3rd April 1849, when on sentry at the residence of Her 
Highness Maharanee Jhunda Kour and her female atten- 
dants, being state prisoners, through great neglect and 
carelessness suffered one of such prisoners, named Hujjoo, 
to escape. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. 



20 



To he revised. — I think the sentence is inade- 
quate to the crime. 

Revised Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labor for 
one year. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks. — The Court having sentenced an ade- 
quate punishment, I shall remit the hard labor in 
this case, for reasons which I do not choose to 
make public. — Head Quarters, 11th July 1849. 



Private Henry Grove, H. M. "10th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Dum-Dura, 4th July 
1849. 

Charges. — Absence from Defaulters' roll call ; striking a 
Sergeant and using insubordinate language ; absence from 
Hospital without leave. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes ; two years' imprisonment, and 
to forfeit all advantages of additional pay and of pension. — 
Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, \8thJuly 1849. 



Gunner Henry Major, 2nd Brigade Horse Artillery. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 17th July 
1849. 

Charges. — For disobeying a Corporal and striking him 
with a sword. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year, with solitary con- 
finement for one lunar month in the 4th, 6th and 8th 
months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks. — I will reduce the 28 days of solitary 
confinement to 14 days in each of the named months, 



21 



not from any disposition to pity the prisoner, but 
because this is the period allotted in Her Majesty's 
service. — Head Quarters, 28th July 1849. 

Shaick Rosliun, Jemadar, 70th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Peshawar, 16th July 
1849. 

Charge. — Conduct disgraceful to a Native Officer in 
stealing a gold necklace, the property of Ajeet Sing, Je- 
madar, of the same Regiment. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Remarks. — The sentence to be carried into effect 
in as public a manner as this disgraceful conduct 
deserves. — Head Quarters, 28th July 1849. 



Assistant Surgeon Edward Edlin, M. D. 

At a General Court Martial assembled at Secrole, Be- 
nares, on Monday, the 16th day of July 1849, Assistant 
Surgeon Edward Edlin, M. D., Deputy Apothecary to the 
East India Company and Opium Examiner, was arraigned 
on the following charge : 

For highly unbecoming conduct, in having, at Benares, 
on the 15th of May 1849, in the presence of several Gen- 
tlemen, addressed Captain C. G. Fagan, Deputy Pay 
Master at Benares, in highly abusive language, accusing 
him of " lying and cheating in having several times re- 
peated the same abusive expressions, although remonstrated 
with by some of the Gentlemen present, and treated with 
great forbearance by Captain Fagan ; and in having, when 
left by that Officer and other Gentlemen, called out to 



22 



Captain Fagan " remember, you have been publicly in- 
sulted," or used words to that effect. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances, 
for six months. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 
28th July 1849. 

Lieut. J. W. Eccles, 2nd European Regiment. 

At a General Court Martial assembled at Lahore, on 
Monday, the 16th day of July 1849, Lieutenant James 
William Eccles, of the 2nd European Regiment, was 
arraigned on the following charge : 

For unbecoming conduct, in having, at Lahore, on the 
9th day of May 1849, without having received any pro- 
vocation, struck Shaick Furreed, in the employ of Nub- 
beebux and Company, Native Merchants, a violent blow 
on the face. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be reprimanded in such manner as His 
Excellency the Commander in Chief may be pleased to 
direct. — Confirmed. 

Remarks. — I consider that Lieutenant Eccles 
has had a very weak defence, so weak that it 
amounts to none at all, and he is sentenced to be 
reprimanded. He is therefore reprimanded accord- 
ingly and admonished not to break the peace in 
future. — Head Quarters, 28th July 1849. 

Lieut. F. V. DeMole, 2nd European Regiment. 

Before the same Court Martial, on Thursday, the 19th 
day of July 1849, Lieutenant Frederick Valentine DeMol£, 
of the 2nd European Regiment, was arraigned on the follow- 
ing charge : 



23 



For highly unbecoming conduct, in the following in- 
stances : 

1st. In having, at Lahore, on the 9th of May 1849, 
without having received any provocation, repeatedly struck 
with a whip and with his clenched fist, Nubbeebux, Native 
Merchant. 

2nd. In having, on the same occasion, without any pro- 
vocation, struck with a whip Gungapersaud and Nuzzeera, 
servants of Nubbeebux and Company, Native Merchants. 

Finding. — The Court is of opinion, that the prisoner, 
Lieutenant Frederick Valentine DeMole, of the 2nd Euro- 
pean Regiment, is, on the 

1st instance of the charge, guilty, in having struck as 
charged, the person commonly called " Nubbeebux," but 
whose proper name is " Ghoolam Moortuza ;" on the 

2nd instance of the charge, guilty, with exception of the 
words " and Nuzzeera," of which the Court acquit him ; 
and the Court is of opinion, that the blow inflicted on Gun- 
gapersaud was unintentional. 

And the Court is further of opinion, that the prisoner is 
guilty of the preamble of the charge. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for a period of three calendar months. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, 28th July 1849. 



Lieut. R. B. Norton, 35th N. I. 

At a General Court Martial held at Barrackpore, on 
Monday, the 16th day of July 1849, Lieutenant Robert 
Bruce Norton, of the 35th Regiment Native Light Infantry, 
was arraigned on the following charges ; viz. 

1st. For having, at Barrackpore, on the night of the 
9th April 1849, when on duty as Regimental Officer of the 



24 



day, absented himself from his quarters without leave, and 
without reporting the circumstance, and remained away all 
night and until the afternoon of the following day, having 
proceeded to Calcutta during this interval without permis- 
sion, and in gross neglect of his duty. 

2nd. For having failed to attend the parade of the Re- 
giment at Barrackpore on the morning of the 10th of April 
1849, at which it was his duty to have been present. 

3rd. For having, at Barrackpore, on the morning of the 
10th of April 1849, failed to furnish his report, which it 
was his duty to have done as relieved Officer of the day ; 
and for not having furnished the report till called on for an 
explanation of his neglect, by order of the Commanding 
Officer, on the evening of the same day. 

4th. For having, at Barrackpore, on the evening of the 
10th of April 1849, when furnishing the said report as re- 
lieved Officer of the day, sent in with it a letter written and 
signed for him, and with his approval, by a brother Officer, 
addressed to the Adjutant of the Regiment, in which his 
absence from the morning parade on that day was falsely 
stated to have been caused by his having overslept himself ; 
he, Lieutenant Norton, well knowing that his absence from 
parade was occasioned by his having left his quarters the 
preceding night, and proceeded to Calcutta without per- 
mission and in neglect of his duty. 

Finding. — The Court, upon the evidence before them, 
are of opinion, that the prisoner Lieutenant Robert Bruce 
Norton, of the 35th Regiment Native Light Infantry, is, 

On the 1st charge, guilty, 

On the 2nd charge, guilty, 

On the 3rd charge, guilty, and 

On the 4th charge, guilty of so much of the charge as 
accuses him of having, at Barrackpore, on the evening of 



25 



the 10th April 1849, when furnishing the said report as 
relieved Officer of the day, sent in with it a letter written 
and signed for him, and with his approval, by a brother 
Officer, addressed to the Adjutant of the Regiment, in 
which his absence from the morning parade on that day 
was stated to have been caused by his having overslept 
himself ; but the Court are of opinion, that the statement 
in that letter of his having overslept himself was not false, 
and do therefore acquit him of that and of the remainder 
of the charge. 

Sentence. — The Court sentence the prisoner Lieutenant 
Robert Bruce Norton, of the 35th Regiment Native Light 
Infantry, to be publicly and severely reprimanded. — 
Confirmed. 

Remarks. — I approve of the "finding" but 
regret that I cannot approve of the sentence of the 
Court, which I consider too lenient for so grave a 
military crime, committed by an Officer of ten years' 
standing in the service ! 

The Brigadier Commanding at Barrackpore is to 
read, or cause to be read, first, the proceedings of 
the Court, and then the following reprimand to 
Lieutenant Norton, in the presence of the President 
and Members of the Court, and of all the Officers 
of the Staff and Cantonments of Barrackpore. 

Lieutenant Norton. — You have been tried, and sen- 
tenced to be publicly and severely reprimanded. I believe 
that the severest reprimand to an honorable man, is to point 
out to him the magnitude of his offence. Your's has been that 
of quitting your post when on duty, a crime for which you 
might be cashiered. The Officer of the day has charge of 

E 



26 



his Regimental lines ; he ought to be present at all parades, 
at all roll calls, and, in Queen's Regiments, at all issues of 
provisions or stores ; he is placed on duty to be ready also 
in case of fire or any other accident that may disturb the 
tranquillity of the lines ; to see all orders obeyed ; and 
should any disturbance arise the Officer of the day should 
at once repair to the spot and be ready to take prompt 
measures for its suppression ; in short, his duty is to watch 
his lines or camp by day and by night. This is his duty in 
all armies ! Yet you, Sir, made no scruple to take your pay 
from the public Treasury for the honest execution of this 
duty ! On the day when you abandoned your post, and 
went off to amuse yourself at Calcutta, you received a cer- 
tain amount of Rupees in pay and allowances. This money 
you took from the East India Company, many of whom are 
poor and suffering people ; and you did not do the duty 
for which you were paid by those poor people. But this 
was not the full extent of your crime ; you set the example 
of abandoning your post to the Soldiers whom you com- 
mand, and if any one of these men followed your example, 
you would be obliged to report and bring that man to trial, 
with what feelings on your part I cannot say, but I know 
what the feelings of the man and all his comrades would be, 
namely, those of contempt and disgust towards their Offi- 
cer ! Sir, I believe you to be a brave and honorable man, 
and I trust that such conduct will not happen again ; but it is 
my disagreeable duty to place this truth before you in plain 
language, for I will not allow the discipline of the Indian 
army to be broken with impunity : the lesson may be rude, 
but it is necessary. The rigid performance of regimental 
duty is no less a matter of honesty and honor, than the 
more brilliant and dangerous one of fighting an enemy. 
Now return, Sir, to your duty, and let your future attention 



27 



to that duty become as conspicuous as your bravery was on 
the field of battle ! — Head Quarters, 2nd August 1849. 



Gunner W. Brown, 2nd Brigade Horse Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 14th 
August 1849. 

Charge. — Striking and kicking a Sergeant. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years, with solitary 
confinement for 14 days in the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th 
and 12th months of each year. — Confirmed. 

Remarks. — I cannot approve of the sentence, 
which I consider to be too lenient for a mutineer 
of this description. — Head Quarters, 20th August 
1849. 

Private Bartholomew Buckley, 1st European Bengal 
Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 10th 
August 1849. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Cawnpore, on the 7th of 
July 1849, when on duty at the barrack guard of No. 3 
Company, quitted his guard without leave. 

2nd. For having, at Cawnpore, on the 8th of July 1849, 
when a prisoner in the quarter guard of the Regiment, 
endeavoured to persuade Private Evoy, of the same Regi- 
ment, not to submit to the sentence awarded him by a dis- 
trict Court Martial, and in having, at the same time and 
place, insubordinately disregarded the order of his superior 
Officer, Sergeant Thomas Shaw, in the execution of his 
office, who desired him, Private Buckley, to be silent, and 
not to interfere. 



28 



3rd. For having, at Cawnpore, on the 9th of July 1849, 
at the orderly room of the Regiment, behaved with great 
disrespect to his commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel 
D. Birrell, in having positively refused to salute him, 
although repeatedly ordered to do so. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year with solitary 
confinement for a lunar month in the 3rd, 5th, and 7th 
months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks. — 1st. I limit each portion of solitary 
confinement to fourteen days, in lieu of twenty- 
eight days. 

2nd. A Court Martial should not call upon an 
Adjutant for the character of a prisoner, when 
there are Officers of his company, which Officers 
ought to know the characters of their men better 
than the Adjutant. — Head Quarters, l<dth August 
1849. 

Private Hees Griffiths, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 15th 
August 1849. 

Charge. — Throwing a tin pot at and using indecent and 
abusive language to a Sergeant Major. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year with solitary con- 
finement for the first 14 days in the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 
10th and 12th months. — Confirmed. 

Remarks. — 1st. I cannot " approve" of the sen- 
tence, which I hold to be too lenient for unprovoked 
mutiny. 



29 



2nd. It surprizes me to see that a Court, which 
I am sure sought in every way to do justice to the 
prisoner, should apply to the prosecutor for that 
prisoner's character ! The Adjutant is not the 
proper person for a Court to call upon for the 
character of a prisoner at any time ; but certainly 
not when he is prosecutor. The proper person to 
give the character of a prisoner is the Officer of 
his company. — Head Quarters, 22nd August 1849. 

Sheobuksh, Camp Follower. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Neemuch, 3rd August 
1849. 

Charges. — Stealing Opium and receiving stolen Opium. 

Finding. — Guilty on two of three charges. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labor for two years. — 
Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation by the Court. — The Court beg respect- 
fully to bring to the notice, and lenient consideration of His 
Excellency the Commander in Chief, the length of time the 
prisoner has unavoidably suffered confinement previous to 
trial. 

Remarks. — I pardon the prisoner in considera- 
tion of the recommendation of the Court, and because 
the boy seems to have been in the hands of a set of 
knaves. — Head Quarters, 22nd August 1849. 

Sergeant Major C. Johnson, Garrison Sergeant 
Major, Chunar. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Secrole, Benares, 17th 
August 1849. 



30 



Charge. — With gross neglect of duty, in having, at Chu- 
nar, between the 5th and 18th of April 1849, permitted two 
Native women, said to be "attendants on the Maharanee 
Jhunda Kour, a state prisoner in that fortress, to pass daily 
in and out by the outer gate of the state prison, without 
having obtained orders from his superior officers regard- 
ing them, and without reporting to his superior officers the 
entrance or egress of these women on any occasion during 
that period. 

Finding. — Guilty, with the exception of the word 
" daily." 

Sentence. — Reduction to the ranks. — Approved and con- 
firmed. 

Recommendation. — In consideration of the previous ad- 
mirable character held by the prisoner, and his long service, 
the Court unanimously beg to recommend him strongly to 
the merciful consideration of His Excellency the Comman- 
der in Chief. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — In consideration of the recommendation of 
the Court, of the long service, and good character 
of the prisoner, upon which the recommendation is 
justly founded, and also in consideration of the 
careless and most unsatisfactory way in which the 
state prisoner appears to have been confined, 
I pardon the prisoner. — Head Quarters, 22nd 
August 1849. 

Sergeant G. Hind, Invalid Establishment. 

Tried by the above Court Martial, 18th August 1849. 
Charge. — With gross neglect of duty, in having, at Chu- 
nar, on the evening of the 18th April 1849, permitted two 



31 



Native women, said to be attendants on the Maharanee 
Jhunda Kour, a state prisoner in that fortress, to pass out of 
the state prison, without having obtained any orders from his 
superior officers regarding them, and without reporting the 
circumstance to his superior officer. 

Finding. — Not guilty. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, 29th August 1849. 

Sewchurn Opudhia, Havildar, 65th iV". /. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Benares, 6th August 
1849. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Chunar, on the 6th April 
1849, when on duty as one of the guard at the apartments 
in which the Maharanee Jhunda Kour, a state prisoner, was 
confined, and when in charge of the keys of those apart- 
ments, in gross neglect of duty, and in disobedience of 
orders, suffered a female, assuming to be an attendant on 
Her Highness, to pass out of the said apartments, and from 
the precincts of the state prison, and further continued 
daily to allow a female, being either the same, or in similar 
guise, to enter and quit the said apartments, until the 18th 
April 1849. 

2nd. For having failed to report to any of his superior 
officers, from the 6th to the 21st April 1849, that a female 
had been allowed by him to go in and out of the state 
prison daily between the 6th and 18th April 1849. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Reduction to the ranks, with imprisonment 
and hard labor for one year. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation of the Court. — The Court unanimously 
and respectfully beg to recommend the prisoner to the con- 
sideration of His Excellency the Commander in Chief, on 
account of his former very good character. 



82 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I remit the sentence passed on the prisoner 
for the same reasons which have induced me to 
pardon Sergeant Major Johnson. — Head Quarters, 
30th August 1849. 

Kullunder Buhsh and Goolam Allie, Sowars, \2th 
Irregular Cavalry. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Rawul Pindee, 24th 
and 25th August 1849. 

Charge. — Desertion from the camp at Goojerat. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labor for ten years. — 
Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Officer of the prisoner's troop should 
have been called upon for the character of the cul- 
prit, and not the Adjutant. This remark applies 
equally to all troop or company Officers, European 
or Native. — Head Quarters, 1st September 1849. 



Jerbundhun Singh, Sepoy, 61st N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 14th August 
1849. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Govindgurh, on the 26th 
June 1849, repeatedly struck, with a drawn sword, his supe- 
rior Officer Muntah Singh, Havildar, of the same Regi- 
ment, being on duty, and severely wounded him on the 
head, neck, left arm and left hand. 

2nd. For having, at the same time and place, struck 
with a drawn sword, his superior Officer Ramdehul Pattuck, 



33 



Havildar, of the same Regiment, being on duty, and 
wounded him on the back. 

3rd. For disgraceful conduct, in having, at the same 
time and place, cruelly assaulted Ally Buksh Khan, Sepoy, 
of the same Regiment, and struck him with a sword, there- 
by severely wounding him on the face. 

Finding. — 1st Charge, Guilty, 2nd, Not Guilty, 3rd, 
Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labor for ten years. 

By the Commander in Chief. — The sentence 
bears no proportion to the crime, which is that of 
attempting to murder three men. There is no 
evidence to warrant the Court acquitting the 
prisoner of the 2nd charge. 

Revised Finding. — 1st Charge, Guilty, 2nd, Guilty, with 
the exception of the words " and wounded him on the 
back," 3rd, Guilty. 

Revised Sentence. — Death by hanging. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Recommendation of the Court. — No actual loss of life 
having arisen out of the prisoner's misconduct, the Court, 
on that ground, beg leave unanimously to recommend him 
to the merciful consideration of His Excellency the Com- 
mander in Chief. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — In consequence of the recommendation of 
the Court, I will commute the sentence of death 
into that of imprisonment for life with hard labor ; 
and I hope that this punishment will have a suffi- 
cient effect in sustaining discipline. Long years 
of imprisonment, till death puts an end to the cri- 



34 



minal's miseries, is a terrible fate ! Let the bad 
Soldier of the Indian Armies consider of it. To 
the good Soldier no caution is required. 

It is in this hope, that the awful sentence of per- 
petual imprisonment will have a just and sufficient 
effect, without the necessity of inflicting capital 
punishment, that I am induced to spare the life of 
this criminal, and not altogether on the grounds 
which have induced the Court to recommend him 
to mercy, namely, that no " loss of life has arisen 
out of the prisoner's misconduct." No loss of life 
has arisen, it is true, but the breach of disci- 
pline has been the same, though the culprit did 
not add the crime of murder to the crime of 
mutiny. 

The prisoner is to be transported beyond Sea for 
life, there to undergo his imprisonment. — Head 
Quarters, 1th September 1849. 



Second Lieutenant H. R. Farnden, H. 31. 60th Royal 
Rifles. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Kurrachee, 14th 
May 1849. 

Charges. — 1st, Breaking arrest; 2nd, Publicly and fami- 
liarly associating with non-commissioned officers and 
privates. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, 23rd June 1849. 



35 



Lieutenant George John Ashton, H. M. 53rd Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Ruwal Pindee, 14th 
August 1849. 

Charge. — Scandalous conduct. 1st, in having been in a 
state of intoxication in quarters. 2nd, in having on the same 
occasion violently assaulted and repeatedly struck Lieute- 
nant W. H. Grubbe, H. M. 53rd Foot. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be dismissed the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Recommendation. — The Court beg leave to recommend 
the prisoner Lieutenant George John Ashton, of Her Ma- 
jesty's 53rd Regiment of Foot, to the merciful considera- 
tion of His Excellency the Commander in Chief. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — There are few things that are more pain- 
ful than to refuse mercy, but it is my duty to 
support discipline in the vast Army of India, and 
discipline cannot be upheld if Officers, who are, 
by Law, the Judges that try Private Soldiers, for 
drunkenness, set an example of the crime! This 
Lieutenant Ashton has done ; and though it is by 
far the worst part of the delinquent's conduct, it 
is not all. The being intoxicated after dinner, 
however unbecoming and disgraceful it is to the 
character of a well-bred gentleman, may still have 
the pretext of conviviality for a thoughtless, but 
culpable, excess in a young man. This, however, 
is not the. crime of the prisoner. His has been 
deliberate drunkenness ; a glaring disregard of 



36 



decency in the broad face of day ; an act destruc- 
tive to all society, all discipline, all moral feelings, 
and calculated to make the uniform of a British 
Officer a bye-word and a shame ! 

The Court has recommended Lieutenant Ashton 
to mercy, but it has offered no reason for this 
recommendation. The above are mine for refus- 
ing a recommendation which has no apparent 
foundation; and therefore, while it adds much to 
the pain of performing a distressing duty, cannot 
divert me from the paramount object of a Com- 
mander in Chief; namely, that of supporting the 
integrity of Military discipline and the high cha- 
racter of British Officers. I will not pardon Lieute- 
nant Ashton. — Head Quarters, 30th August 1849. 



Lieutenant H. F. H. Parker, H. M. 53rd Foot. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 18th August 1849. 

Charge. — Highly unbecoming conduct, in having on 
two occasions used grossly offensive and insulting language 
to Assistant Surgeon G. K. Hardie, M. D., of the same 
Regiment, and refusing to apologise for it. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, 30th August 1849. 

Private James O'Neil, H. M. 6\st Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Peshawur, 20th 
August 1849. 



37 



Charge. — Having had in his possession and secreted 
about his person a mould for making counterfeit rupees. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Though the crime is great and the sen- 
tence just, it is a very heavy punishment, and in 
consideration of the great heat of the climate, I 
remit one (1) year of the imprisonment. — Head 
Quarters, 29th August 1849. 



Private Michael Kelly , H. M. 6\st Foot. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, on the same day. 

Charges. — 1st. Desertion ; 2nd, Having taken away a 
musket and brought it back in an unserviceable state, and 
having lost or made away with regimental appointments 
and necessaries. 

Finding. — 1st Charge, Guilty ; 2nd Charge, Guilty as 
to the musket only. 

Sentence. — Transportation for seven years. — Approved 
and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The prisoner carried away many articles 
of necessaries as well as his musket, and he came 
back without these necessaries. I cannot under- 
stand why the Court should limit the finding of 
" Guilty" on this 2nd charge to taking away his 
musket only ? The Court should, in my opinion, 
have convicted him fully on that charge. 



38 



Where the prisoner was taken, and if by force, 
and other evident matters ought to have been 
investigated, because the want of this investigation 
gives some degree of plausibility to the defence. — 
Head Quarters, 29 th August 1849. 

Captain John Turton, 3rd N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Jullunder, 29th August 
1849. 

Charge. — For having, on the 20th April 1849, quitted 
his Regiment, in camp, at Boodee-kot, without leave and 
in direct disregard of his commanding Officer's orders, and 
proceeded to Hosheyarpore. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for three months. — Confirmed. — Head Quarters, 6th Sep- 
tember 1849. 

Private Benjamin Alexander Mossman, \st Bombay 
European Regiment. 
Tried by General Court Martial in camp near Peshawur, 
2nd July 1849. 

Charge. — Murder of Private John Bethune, same regi- 
ment, by shooting him. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Death by hanging. — Approved and confirmed. 
— Head Quarters, 8th September 1849. 



Regulating- Leave of Absence. 

Head Quaeters, Simla, 26th Juot: 1849. 
1. Many applications for leave of absence have 
been made to the Commander in Chief, which ap- 



39 



plications are grounded upon former General Orders. 
These General Orders are hereby cancelled. The 
Commander in Chief does not wish to refuse a fair 
portion of leave of absence, when it can be granted 
without detriment to the service, but the conquest 
of a large country is not concluded by the battle 
which wins it ; the army must remain alert in its 
cantonments to support the Civil Authorities till 
the conquered country be settled. 

This is the present position of the Queen's and 
Company's armies in India, and the Commander 
in Chief will not grant leaves of absence to Offi- 
cers, except on special occasions, supported by 
cogent reasons. Officers must remain at their 
posts with their non-commissioned Officers and 
Private Soldiers. No Regiment has an Officer to 
spare, but on the contrary they have all of them 
too few ; and the duties of those few must not be 
increased by leave of absence lightly conceded: 
therefore, 

2nd. Commanders of Divisions, Brigades, and 
Regiments, are requested not to apply for leave of 
absence for any one under their command, without 
forwarding publicly or confidentially the special 
reasons which induce them to sanction such appli- 
cations for leave. 

3rd. Any Officer in command allowing an ap- 
plicant for leave to quit his post in anticipation of 
such application being granted, does so at his own 



40 



no small responsibility ; the sickness of an Officer, 
non-commissioned Officer or Private Soldier, or of 
any one belonging to them, is of course an exception 
to this order, the object of which is to support disci- 
pline, not to produce or increase individual afflictions. 

Regimental and Company Commands. 

Head Quarters, Simla, 19th September 1849. 
His Excellency the Commander in Chief is pleas- 

G.O.G.G.Stk September and ed to dire Ct, that the 

g.g. o.No.m, Oct** ibm. Geneml Orders quoted 
in the margin, by which it is provided, that " com- 
" manding Officers present with their corps, but 
" incapable, from sickness, of conducting the duties 
" of command, will, in the event of such sickness 
" being prolonged beyond the period of one month, 
" be directed to deliver over charge of the Regiment 
" to the next senior Officer present, to whom the com- 
" mand allowance will be passed," shall be extended 
to Officers commanding companies, who, in like man- 
ner, are to be directed by the Officer commanding the 
Regiment to deliver over charge to the Officer next 
entitled to a company, and who will likewise be en- 
titled to the allowances going with such a charge. 

Uniform of 1st European Bengal Fusiliers. 

Head Quarters, Simla, 27th September 1849. 

His Excellency the Commander in Chief consi- 
dering it highly desirable that a plainer style of 



41 



dress than the very expensive uniform at present 
worn by the Officers of the 1st European Bengal 
Fusiliers, should henceforth be adopted, is pleased, 
with the sanction of the Most Xoble the Governor 
General of India, to authorize the gradual introduc- 
tion into that corps of the uniform prescribed for 
Fusilier Regiments in Her Majesty's service. 

Courts Martial. 

Private William Thompson, H. M. 80th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Dinapore, 8th 
September 1849. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Dinapore, on the 30th 
July 1849, wantonly destroyed a musket issued to him for 
the public service. 

2nd. For having, at Dinapore, on the 2nd of August 
1849, made use of grossly mutinous language to Major R. 
A. Lockhart, Her Majesty's 80th Regiment, President of a 
district Court Martial, before which the prisoner was being 
tried, calling him " a damned swindler," "a hangman look- 
ing rascal," and using other abusive words to that Officer. 

3rd. For having, at the time and place last stated, made 
use of grossly mutinous language to Lieutenant G. Bodle, 
Adjutant of Her Majesty's 80th Regiment, in the execu- 
tion of his office, repeatedly calling him " a damned scoun- 
drel," or using words to that effect. 

4th. For having, at the same time and place offered 
violence against the President and Members of the district 
Court Martial, his superior Officers, being in the execution 
of their office ; he having assumed a threatening attitude 
towards them, using at the same time violent language, and 

G 



42 



having been prevented committing actual violence against 
them, only by being seized before his purpose was effected 
and forcibly placed in irons. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for life. — Approved and con- 
firmed. — Head Quarters, 24th September 1849. 



Private James Smyth, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Agra, 6th September 
1849. 

Charge. — Theft of Rupees 740 belonging to Officers and 
men of the Regiment. 
Finding. — Guil ty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years, with solitary 
confinement for 28 days in the 3rd, 6th and 10th months of 
each year. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — In the sentence the periods of twenty-eight 
days of solitary confinement are to be reduced to 
periods of fourteen days. — Head Quarters, 26th 
September 1849. 

Private Robert Jamieson, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers. 
Tried by the same Court Martial, 8th September 1849. 
Charge. — As in the last case. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years, with solitary 
confinement for 28 days in the 2nd, 5th and 8th months of 
each year ; and to forfeit all advantage as to increase of 
pay or as to pension on discharge. — Approved and con- 
firmed. 



43 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — In the sentence the periods of twenty-eight 
days of solitary confinement are to be reduced to 
periods of fourteen days. — Head Quarters, 2Qth 
September 1849. 

Privates Michael O'Brien and John JBloomfield, 1st 
European Bengal Fusiliers. 
Tried by the same Court Martial, 10th September 1849. 
Charge. — Receiving and possessing sums of money 
knowing them to be stolen. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, 26th September 1849. 

Ensign Melchior Henry Coombe, 45 th iV. /. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 26th Sep- 
tember 1849. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Umballah, on the 22nd of 
August 1849, been drunk when on duty as Regimental 
Officer of the day. 

2nd. For having, at the same place, on the same day, 
neglected to march off the guards in the morning, and to 
visit the guards in the evening. 

3rd. For having, at the same place, on the following 
day, sent in for the information of his commanding Officer, 
a false return of the number of men in hospital and on re- 
gimental duty on the 22nd of August 1849 ; the said return 
deviating in several respects from the established form, 
stating a parole different from the one given by authority 
of his commanding Officer on that day, and signed by 
Ensign Coombe, in the assumed rank of Lieutenant. 

Finding. — Guilty. 



44 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, 3rd October 1849. 



Private Richard Oakley, H. M. 3rd Light Dragoons. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 29th Sep- 
tember 1849. 

Charges. — Drunkenness, violent conduct, and abusive 
language. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year with solitary con- 
finement for the first 14 days of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 
6th months, and for the last 14 days of the 12th month. — 
Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, Simla, 3rd 
October 1849. 



Private James Murphy, H. M. \0th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Ferozepore, 19th 
September 1849. 

Charge. — For insubordinate and outrageous conduct, in 
the following instances : 

1st. In having, in his barrack room at Ferozepore, on 
or about the 4th August 1849, stabbed with his bayonet, 
No. 1530 7 5 j 5 F , Private John Mahon, of the grenadier com- 
pany, Her Majesty's 10th Regiment, thereby inflicting a 
wound on his arm. 

2nd. In having at Ferozepore, on or about the 7th 
August 1849, when a prisoner in the orderly room of the 
corps, and undergoing an investigation of the 1st instance 
of the charge, most unprovokedly and wantonly struck with 
his clenched fist Sergeant Major Michael O'Donnell, his 
superior Officer, when in the execution of his office. 

Find ing. — G uilty . 



45 



Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years, with solitary- 
confinement for the last 14 days of the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 
10th and 12th months of each year. — Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Men have been shot for less heinous mili- 
tary crimes. — Head Quarters, 3rd October 1849. 



Private Dennis Murphy, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Agra, 12th Septem- 
ber 1849. 

Charge. — Wounding Private Dennis Shea, with a knife, 
with intent to murder. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Death by hanging. — Approved and confirm- 
ed. — Head Quarters, 26th September 1849. 



Gunner James Fitzpatrich, 3rd Company 4th Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 2nd 
October 1849. 

Charge. — Desertion from camp at Jugraon. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for seven years, and branding 
with the letter D. in the usual manner. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, 10th October 1849. 

Sepoy Jalim Sing, 3\st N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Peshawur, 1st Octo- 
ber 1849. 

Charge. — Breaking open a box and abstracting there- 
from Rupees 404, the property of the State. 



46 



Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labor for 12 years. — 
Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I remit six years of this culprit's sen- 
tence. — Head Quarters, 10th October 1849. 

Private Hezekiah Goodsell, H. M. 3rd Light Dragoons. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 1st Octo- 
ber 1849. 

Charges. — 1st, Absence from guard mounting 1 , parade and 
for seventy-four hours without leave ; 2nd, Having lost or 
made away with regimental clothing and necessaries ; 3rd, 
Striking a Sergeant. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes, two years' imprisonment, and to 
be placed under stoppages for the articles mentioned in the 
2nd Charge. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I do not understand how Corporal Mathew 
Derby was 75 hours on duty. Orderlies ought to 
be relieved daily. I request that the commanding 
Officer will be so good as to explain this in a letter 
to the Adjutant General, Queen's Troops. — Head 
Quarters, 10th October 1849. 

Major TJiomas Cooke, 17*7* N. I. 
At a General Court Martial assembled at Lahore, on 
Friday, the 28th day of September 1849, Major Thomas 
Cooke, of the 17th Regiment Native Infantry, was ar- 
raigned on the following charges : 



47 



First. For unofficer-like conduct, especially unbecom- 
ing an Officer commanding a Regiment, in having, at 
Jugraon and at Mullickpore, in the months of February 
and March 1849, played at chess and at cards with 
Captain L. G. DaCosta, of the 58th Regiment Native 
Infantry, for large stakes and bets, in the course of 
which play he lost to Captain DaCosta the sum of twenty- 
six thousand Rupees, or thereabouts ; such conduct being 
in direct disobedience of repeated General Orders prohibiting 
gambling in the Army, viz., General Orders by the Com- 
mander in Chief, dated respectively the 25th of September 
1820, the 16th of August 1831, and the 26th of June 1845. 

Second. For conduct unbecoming an Officer and a 
Gentleman, in having, at Mullickpore, about 17th March 
1849, and at Lahore, about 21st April and 21st May 1849, 
tried to evade the payment of the large sum he had lost to 
Captain DaCosta, by endeavouring to induce him to accept 
a much smaller amount on various pretences ; by offering 
Captain DaCosta, whatever money he, Major Cooke, might 
win at Simla in the present year ; and by declaring that he 
could never pay the whole sum he had lost • and in having 
further demurred to pay on account of certain calumnious 
reports to the prejudice of Captain DaCosta's character, 
which he, Major Cooke, had spread about; for spreading 
which he afterwards, about the 23rd of May 1849, apolo- 
gized to Captain DaCosta. 

Third. For conduct unbecoming an Officer and a 
Gentleman, in having, in a letter addressed to the Major of 
Brigade at Lahore, dated Lahore, the 21st of July 1849, 
given inaccurate statements of the transactions between 
himself and Captain DaCosta, in the following instances : 

1st. In having, in the said letter, made a false statement 
in the following words : " Merely as an amusement we did 



48 



" play together at chess and at cards for one Rupee per 
" game ; that afterwards, when under excitement, some 
" large bets were made, ending in my having lost 26,000 
" Rupees, this being a larger sum than I could immediately 
" command, I requested Captain DaCosta to wait till I 
" could draw the money from England, when the debt 
" should be paid, but he replied that he would prefer half 
" paid down, and it ended by my giving a bill for 10,000 
" Rupees, a buggy and horse, and cash, equalling together 
" 13,000 Rupees," whereas, in truth, the parties played for 
large stakes, besides making large bets, and Captain 
DaCosta did not state he would prefer half paid down, 
neither was any prompt payment either offered or agreed to 
in respect of the greater part of the amount ; but he was 
induced to agree to the specified arrangement by Major 
Cooke declaring on his honor, that he would never be able 
to pay more of the debt he had incurred than the said sum 
of thirteen thousand Rupees, and further induced thereto 
by Major Cooke retracting and apologizing for the calum- 
nious reports he had spread about regarding him. 

2nd. In having, in the said letter, disingenuously and 
falsely stated as follows : " He (Captain DaCosta) then con- 
" sidered his character injured by me, and applied to his 
" commanding Officer, who applied to me, and expressed 
" himself in writing perfectly satisfied, but Captain DaCosta 
" was not so, and referred the case to Brigadier Godby, but 
" subsequently recalled the reference of his own accord 
thereby insinuating, that Captain DaCosta had no ground 
for making that complaint, whereas he, Major Cooke, had 
injured the character of Captain DaCosta, and the com- 
manding Officer of the 58th Native Infantry did not express 
himself satisfied till Major Cooke had expressed his regret, 
while Captain DaCosta, who still pressed his complaint upon 



49 



the attention of superior authority, was at length in- 
duced to withdraw it solely by Major Cooke's subsequent 
retraction of all that he had said to the prejudice of Captain 
DaCosta, and making an apology for it. 

Finding. — The Court, from the evidence before them, is 
of opinion, that the prisoner Major Thomas Cooke, of the 
17th Regiment Native Infantry, is, on the 
1st charge, guilty. 

2nd charge, guilty ; and guilty of the preamble to the 
2nd charge. 

3rd charge, 1st instance, not guilty, and acquit him. 
2nd instance, guilty ; and guilty of the preamble of the 
3rd charge. 

Sentence. — The Court sentence the prisoner Major Thomas 
Cooke, of the 17th Regiment Native Infantry, to be dis- 
missed from the service. — Confirmed. — Head Quarters, 
Simla, 17 th October 1849. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I cannot approve of the finding of acquittal 
on the 1st instance of the 3rd charge, which appears 
to me to be sufficiently proved. 

Recommendation of the Court. — The Court beg to recom- 
mend the prisoner to the merciful consideration of His Ex- 
cellency the Commander in Chief on the following grounds : 

1st. Because the prisoner showed a disposition to pay, as 
evinced by his attempt to borrow from 18 to 20,000 Rupees 
from the North-Western Bank Agency on 21st April 1849. 

2nd. Because he did not originate the reports against 
Captain DaCosta. 

3rd. On account of the excellent character Major Cooke 
has hitherto borne, as shown by the handsome testimonials 
which have been placed before the Court. 

H 



50 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — It is with pain that I express my inability 
to discover any just grounds for disturbing the 
sentence pronounced by the Court. — Head Quar- 
ters, Simla, 11 th October 1849. 

The Destination of Regiments. 

Adjutant General's Office, Simla, 8th 
November 1849. 

His Excellency the Commander in Chief has 
received the most extraordinary letters from 
Officers commanding corps, both regular and 
irregular, praying to have the destination of 
their Regiments changed. The Commander in 
Chief begs to inform these Gentlemen, that the 
troops are moved to suit the public convenience, 
and not the convenience of individuals, and he 
desires that such an un soldier-like and disorderly 
practice may not again take place to the disgrace 
of military discipline. The Commander in Chief 
seldom, intentionally, leaves any one's letter un- 
answered, but he will not in future reply to letters 
of such a nature as these ; for this once he assures 
these Gentlemen that not one of their unmilitary 
requests shall be complied with. 

Courts ZHartial. 

First Lieutenant T. W. Pulman, Artillery. 
At a General Court Martial re-assembled at Lahore, on 
the 18th day of October 1849, 1st Lieutenant Thomas 



51 



Walter Pulman, of the Regiment of Artillery, was arraigned 
on the following charges : 

First charge. — For conduct disgraceful to an Officer and 
a Gentleman, in the following instances : 

1st. In having, at Lahore, on the 5th April 1849, 
before the Military Court of Requests there held, attempt- 
ed to defraud Adam Ali, Native Merchant of Lahore, of 
his just claim against him, by deposing on his oath, that 
the signature to a voucher produced in support of the said 
claim was not his, although he well knew that his signature 
had been affixed thereto with his consent on or about the 
21st December 1848, by Lieutenant J. G. Batten, of the 
37th Regiment Native Infantry ; and in further falsely de- 
posing on his oath, that he had never received the articles 
charged to him in the said claim of Adam Ali, and that he 
had no knowledge of the debt. 

2nd. In having, on the same occasion, and at the same 
place, attempted to defraud Cashmeeree Loll, Native 
Merchant of Lahore, of his just claim against him, 
by falsely declaring that he had never heard of, or em- 
ployed, any such person as Cashmeeree Loll; and in 
having further falsely denied having received some of 
the articles charged to him in the claim of the said Cash- 
meeree Loll. 

3rd. In having, at the same time and place, in behalf of 
Lieutenant J. G. Batten, of the 37th Regiment Native 
Infantry, a defendant in an action before the said Court of 
Requests, at the suit of Emambux and Company, Native 
Merchants of Lahore, for soda water furnished on the 21st 
of September 1849 to him, Lieutenant Batten, voluntarily 
stated that he would swear that the initials J. G. B. to a 
voucher for the soda water were not signed by Lieutenant 
Batten, the object of Lieutenant Pulman in so doing, being 



52 



to assist in defrauding the said Emambux and Company 
of their just claim against Lieutenant Batten. 

Second charge. — For having, at Lahore, on the 5th of 
April 1849, appeared before the Military Court of Re- 
quests there held, in a shameful state of intoxication. 

Finding. — The Court is of opinion that the prisoner 
Lieutenant Thomas Walter Pulman, of the Regiment of 
Artillery, is, on the 1st charge, 

1st instance, guilty. 

2nd instance, guilty of having " falsely denied having 
received some of the articles charged to him in the claim 
of the said Cashmeeree Loll." Not guilty of the remainder, 
and acquits him thereof. 

3rd instance, not guilty, and acquits him thereof. 

Of the preamble of the 1st charge, guilty. 

On the 2d charge, not guilty, and acquits him thereof. 

Sentence. — The Court sentence the prisoner Lieutenant 
Thomas Walter Pulman, of the Regiment of Artillery, to be 
dismissed from the service. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I never confirmed the sentence of a Court 
Martial that gave me more pain than I feel in con- 
firming this, which dismisses from the service a. 
young man, of whose abilities I had formed a high 
opinion, when (some years ago) he served under 
my command in the field ! The service has lost 
a clever Officer, an honorable family is thrown 
into deep affliction, and a young man of great 
promise is utterly ruined in his profession by a 
vice which has ruined three others since my arrival 
in India ! It is therefore impossible for me not 



53 



to call upon all who have common sense, resolution 
and respect for their uniform, to join in the endea- 
vour which I am making to repress those destruc- 
tive vices which are so unfortunately prevalent in 
the European portion of the armies in India — drunk- 
enness and gambling. 

Courts Martial are ready to show all practicable 
mercy to a prisoner ; but they will not, and cannot 
sacrifice the honor of the military profession to 
indulgent feelings for an individual, and so cause 
the ruin of numbers ! 

Their sentences shall be carried into effect ! — 
Head Quarters, Secundra, 2nd November 1849. 

Captain Hugh Mackenzie, 2nd European Regiment. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 29th Octo- 
ber 1849. 

Charge. — For highly unbecoming conduct, in having, in 
a letter to the address of Lieutenant Colonel Grant, C. B., 
Adjutant General of the Army, dated Lahore, the 30th of 
June 1849, falsely and recklessly imputed to Major G. R. 
Talbot, of the 2nd European Regiment, cowardice and mis- 
behaviour before the enemy, in the battle of Chilianwalla 
on the 13th of January 1849, and in the battle of Goojerat 
on the 21st of February 1849. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Loss of three steps in his Regiment.— Approved 
and confirmed. — Head Quarters, Delhi, 9th November 1849. 

Lieutenant Augustus Frederick English, 22nd N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Rawul Pindee, 24th 
October 1849. 



54 



Charge. — For having failed to rejoin his Regiment sta- 
tioned at Rawul Pindee on the 31st of May 1849, on the 
expiration of the temporary leave which had been granted 
to him, in expectation of general leave being sanctioned, 
notwithstanding that he had received the positive orders of 
his commanding Officer to do so, and for having been 
absent without leave, from that date until the 24th of 
August 1849. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be severely reprimanded, and to lose one 
step in the Regiment. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Lieutenant English has been above five 
years in the service, and has therefore no right what- 
ever to put forth the excuse that he was ignorant 
of his duties, especially as he must have seen men 
tried for the offence of which he has been found 
guilty. I feel therefore that it is necessary to 
carry so much of the very proper sentence of 
the Court into execution as to reprimand Lieutenant 
English, and he is hereby reprimanded accord- 
ingly. But I accept of the contrition of Lieute- 
nant English, and in the hope that his conduct will 
be more correct in future, I pardon him the rest of 
his sentence, viz. the loss of one (1) step in the list 
of Lieutenants of the 22nd Regiment Native Infan- 
try. — Head Quarters, Delhi, 1st JYove?7iberlS4:d. 

ShaUi Golam Russool, Jemadar, \2th Irregular Cavalry. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Rawul Pindee, 22nd 
October 1849. 



55 



Charge. — For conduct unbecoming an Officer, in having, 
at Rawul Pindee, on the night of the 8th of September 
1849, absented himself, without leave, from the lines of his 
Regiment after tattoo beating, and proceeded, in disobe- 
dience of strict orders, to the city of Rawul Pindee. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay, and allowances for 
two months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I have approved and confirmed this sen- 
tence, but I consider it to be a very lenient one, 
and I warn all Officers and men of this Regiment, 
that such a direct disobedience of orders shall not 
again be so lightly passed over, if another such 
comes again to my notice. — Head Quarters, Delhi, 
1st November 1849. 

Dabiedeen, Private Camp Follower. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Neemuch, 25th Oc- 
tober 1849. 

Charge. — Having assaulted Jerawun, Camp Follower, 
and pushed him into a well containing deep water, with 
the intention to drown him. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labor for four years. 
— Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I have not approved, because I think the 
sentence too lenient. I feel convinced that this 
was a premeditated attempt at assassination. — 
Head Quarters, Delhi, 10th November 1849. 



56 



Captain Lionel Gomez Da Costa, 58th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 5th Novem- 
ber 1849. 

Charge. — Unofficer-like conduct, in having, at Jugraon 
and at Mulickpore, in the months of February and March 
1849, played at cards with Major T. Cooke, 17th Regiment 
Native Infantry, for large stakes and bets, in the course of 
which play he won from Major Cooke the sum of twenty- 
six thousand Rupees, or thereabouts ; such conduct being 
in direct disobedience of repeated General Orders prohibit- 
ing gambling in the Army • viz., General Orders by the 
Commander in Chief, dated respectively the 25th of Sep- 
tember 1820, the 16th of August 1831, and the 26th of 
June 1845. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be placed at the bottom of the list of 
Captains in the Regiment. — Approved and conformed. — 
Head Quarters, 20th November 1849. 



Lieutenant Francis Robert Tottenham, 7th Light Cavalry. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Jullundur, 10th 
November 1849. 

Charge. — Conduct unbecoming an Officer, in having, 
at Jullundur, on the 24th of August 1849, in a written 
defence presented by him, and read at a Court of Inquiry 
there held to investigate his conduct, expressed himself in 
a highly insubordinate and disrespectful manner respecting 
his Commanding Officer Major B. T. Phillips, command- 
ing the 7th Light Cavalry, unjustifiably alleging, amongst 
other things, that Major Phillips had been actuated by 
" malignant rancour" against him ; had " raked up every 
" little incident against him for no other purpose than to 



57 



" blast his fair fame and reputation ;" had made an 
" impotent" attempt to " exert the influence of a Com- 
" manding Officer over the junior Officers of his corps, to his 
" (Lieutenant Tottenham's) detriment :" had not adopted 
" a manly, frank, open, straightforward proceeding, calcu- 
" lated to inspire him (Lieutenant Tottenham) with that 
" respect and admiration for his Commanding Officer so 
" essential to the well being of the service ;" had " not 
" evinced the most becoming spirit," and that " through- 
" out the proceedings Major Phillips had persecuted him 
" (Lieutenant Tottenham) in an almost unparalleled and 
" unprecedented manner." 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances for 
three months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — 1st. On reading the proceedings of this 
Court Martial, I feel bound to call the attention of 
Major Phillips to the mode in -which he has exer- 
cised his authority as Commanding Officer of a 
Regiment. It was not proper to cause his Adjutant 
to write official notes to Officers, demanding their 
written opinions on the general conduct and cha- 
racter of a brother Officer, and to state the terms 
of friendship on which they stood with him. The 
Officers very properly declined to answer such 
questions, except to a proper tribunal, and even 
then their answering such questions would gene- 
rally be optional ! Major Phillips has to learn that 
if a Commanding Officer has unfortunately cause 

i 



58 



to bring an Officer under his orders to trial, he 
must deal with facts, and not seek to draw forth 
the opinions of his brother Officers on the general 
character of the person he charges with miscon- 
duct. He has a right to make his enquiries as to 
facts, and when he thinks the evidence sufficiently 
strong to prove those specified facts, he gives in 
charges. I am willing to accept Major Phillips' 
assurance, and the opinions of witnesses, that 
Major Phillips' intentions were to serve the public, 
but his mode of proceeding was most injurious and 
destructive of all harmony in a Regiment. 

2nd. I have also to remark that no Court of 
Inquiry, nor a Court Martial, has a right to allow, 
much less advise, a prisoner to withdraw a defence 
once read in public, and casting dishonor on another 
person. The doing this by the Court of Inquiry, 
of which Lieutenant Colonel Downing was Presi- 
dent, was a very unwarrantable proceeding. When 
a man publicly accuses another before any Court 
that Court records the paper, and takes such notice 
of its propriety or impropriety as it deems fitting, 
or leaves it to a higher authority to do so, but it 
has no right to suppress such a paper after it has 
been publicly read. 

3rd. I may here remark on the erroneous 
opinion which seems to have prevailed on the Court 
of Inquiry, of which Lieutenant Colonel Downing 
was President. A Court of Inquiry ought gene- 



50 



rally to be a closed Court ; no one allowed to enter 
but such individuals as are called for, and who 
being privately examined, are sent out. If any 
person happens to be accused of misconduct, he is 
called upon for his statement of the matter in hand 
like any other person ; he may either appear or 
refuse to appear, as he pleases, unless ordered by 
superior authority, and either answer any questions 
put to him, or refuse to answer. The Court may 
either communicate to him what has been said, or 
refuse to communicate to him what it has elicited ; 
it does what it deems best suited to obtain infor- 
mation on which higher authority can safely act. 
It is generally objectionable to make a Court of 
Inquiry an open Court. In this instance it has 
produced a Court Martial, which this Court of 
Inquiry, by its improper mode of proceeding, forced 
upon me as Commander in Chief. Courts of 
Inquiry are objectionable proceedings when they 
can be avoided, but in a large army, they are some- 
times necessary.— Head Quarters, Umballah, 17th 
November 1849. 

Lieutenant John Edward Hussey Taylor, H. M. 10th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Ferozepore, 1st 
October 1849. 

Charges. — 1st Charge. — For having in action at Mool- 
tan, on or about the 3rd of January 1849, misbehaved be- 
fore the enemy ; he having, when No. 4 company, to which 
he belonged, was advancing to the assault of the Dowlut 



60 



gate of Mooltan, separated himself from the men and taken 
refuge in a small house, and there remained under shelter 
till some time after the capture of the gate. 

2nd Charge. — For having, in action at Goojerat, on the 
21st of February 1849, misbehaved before the enemy on 
two occasions ; he having, while in the supernumerary 
rank of the company to which he belonged, when the 
Regiment was advancing under fire of the enemy, marched 
with his body stooped down, under the influence of fear ; 
and having afterwards, when the men were lying down 
under fire of the enemy, reclined in their rear and availed 
himself of the partial protection of a cavity in the ground, 
under the influence of fear ; in both these instances setting 
a very bad example to the men of the company. 

3rd Charge. — For having, at Ferozepore, on or about the 
9th of June 1849, improperly questioned Sergeant James 
O'Connor, of Her Majesty's 10th Foot, relative to the infor- 
mation given by him to the Commanding Officer, when 
called on so to do, relative to his, Lieutenant Taylor's 
conduct at the battle of Goojerat, as alleged in the second 
charge ; and for having, on the same occasion, spoken 
most disrespectfully and unbecomingly of his Command- 
ing Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Franks, C. B., Command- 
ing Her Majesty's 10th Regiment, by informing Sergeant 
O'Connor, that Lieutenant Colonel Franks and himself had 
previously had a dispute, and that he, Lieutenant Taylor, 
believed his Commanding Officer wished to injure him, or 
words to that effect. 

4th Charge. — For having, at Ferozepore, on or about 
the 5th of July 1849, improperly communicated, at the 
orderly room, with Sergeant Michael Lloyd and Sergeant 
Michael O'Donnell, of Her Majesty's 10th Regiment, and 
rebuked the former, respecting the statements made by 



61 



them at a Regimental Court of Inquiry, held at Ferozepore 
on the 2nd of July and subsequent days, to investigate his 
(Lieutenant Taylor's) conduct, as alleged in the second 
charge ; and unbecomingly warned them that it was his 
intention to cross-examine them strictly before a Court 
Martial, and if they were not careful they would convict 
themselves, for they had been very nervous at the Court 
of Inquiry, or words to that effect. 

Finding. — Not guilty, and a most full and most honora- 
ble acquittal of the whole and every part of the charges. — 
Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — These proceedings have been extended to 
a most unwarrantable length by the admission of a 
very great proportion of irrelevant matter, the 
blame of such irregular proceedings rests mainly 
with the President, whose duty it was to have 
checked and prevented the introduction of such 
objectionable matter, and had this duty been pro- 
perly performed, the Court need not have sat for 
nineteen days extending over a period of a month, 
to the great inconvenience of the public service. — 
Head Quarters, Camp, 21st November 1849. 

Cornet John Dunkin Bennett, H. M. 3rd Light Dragoons. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Fort William, 7th 
November 1849. 

Charge. — Being drunk when on duty as Officer of the 
guard on board the Ship Camperdown. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. 



62 



Recommendation by the Court. — The Court, having 
awarded the only sentence which they deem commensurate 
with the serious offence committed by Cornet Bennett, do 
most earnestly recommend him to the merciful consi- 
deration of His Excellency the Commander in Chief, 
in consequence of his youth, contrition, and total inex- 
perience. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I do not consider the youth of the prison- 
er to be any excuse, his contrition is good, his 
" total inexperience" is some excuse, as it prevent- 
ed his being aware of the magnitude of his crime ; 
and this inexperience, added to his frank and man- 
ly defence, induces me to pardon Cornet Bennett, 
and I trust he will prove a better Officer than his 
beginning promises. He is to join his regiment, 
and his Commanding Officer is to report to me, till 
further orders, how Cornet Bennett conducts him- 
self. This report to be quarterly. — Head Quar- 
ters, Camp, 25th November 1849. 

The Review at XVIeean IMCeer. 

Head Quarters, Camp Lahore, 15th 
December 1849. 

At the late review of the troops on the plain of 
Meean Meer, the following egregious deficiencies 
were evident to all : 

1st. That some Commanders of Regiments were 
unable to bring their Regiments properly into the 
general line. 



S3 



2nd. One Commanding Officer of a Regiment 
attempted to wheel his whole Regiment as he 
would a company ! 

3rd. Several Officers commanding companies 
were seen disordering their companies by attempt- 
ing to dress them from the wrong flank. 

4th. When the line was ordered to be formed 
on the left column, some Commanders deployed too 
soon, and ordered their lines, (thus improperly 
formed) to " double quick" in order to regain their 
position ! This was all bad ; but it was worse to 
see these Regiments on receiving the word to 
" double quick" at once charge with loud shouts ; 
no such order to charge having been given by any 
one, nor the word " prepare to charge" nor did any 
thing occur to give a pretext for such a disgrace- 
ful scene, exhibiting both want of drill and want 
of discipline ! 

5th. Bad as this was, it was not the worst. 
"When these Regiments chose to " charge" the 
Commander in Chief, to his astonishment, beheld 
the men discharging their firelocks straight up in 
the air, and he saw some men of the rear rank 
actually firing off their musquets to the rear over 
their shoulders as their bearers (he will not call 
them Soldiers) were running to the front ! He 
feels assured that no such a scene could have oc- 
curred in any other Regiments in the Army : if 
ever such again happens, he will expose the Com- 



64 



manding Officer of any Regiment that so disgraces 
itself, in public orders, to the whole of the Indian 
Army. In the course of his service he never 
before witnessed such a scene. No Commander 
could go into action with a Regiment capable of 
such conduct without feeling certain that it would 
behave ill ! The Commander in Chief will, there- 
fore, hold Commanding Officers responsible (for 
they alone are to blame) that any Soldier who 
shouts, or charges, or fires, without orders, be 
instantly seized, tried at once by a drum-head Court 
Martial, and the sentence executed on the spot. 
Courts Martial which try such dangerous offenders 
will, the Commander in Chief has no doubt, uphold 
military discipline and military honor against out- 
rageous and criminal disorder. 

This order may be deemed severe : the Com- 
mander in Chief means it to be so, for he will not 
pass over without animadversion, faults which, if 
tolerated, would in the event of war produce cer- 
tain defeat to this army. The reviews which the 
Commander in Chief makes of the troops are not 
to be taken as so many " chips in porridge." They 
are made for the purpose of ascertaining what 
Officers are fit to command battalions, and there 
being no want of such in the Indian Army ; he 
will feel it to be his bounden duty to remove those 
who are not ; and whenever he finds a Regiment 
"Jire" " shout" or " charge" without orders from 



65 



its Commander, he will, after this warning, remove 
the latter from his command. 

The Sepoy is both a brave and an obedient 
Soldier ; and whenever he behaves ill, it is in a 
great measure the fault of his Commanding Officer. 

The drill and discipline of all armies rest main- 
ly with the Commanders of Regiments and of Com- 
panies. They are in immediate contact with the 
Officers, non-commissioned Officers and Private 
Soldiers ; and to them General Officers must look 
for that perfect obedience, without which an army 
is an armed mob, dangerous to its friends, and 
contemptible to its enemies. 

The Commander in Chief does not hereby call 
on Commanding Officers to torment those under 
their orders by long and harassing drilling. But 
he does call upon them to instruct their Officers, 
and to instruct themselves, and also their super- 
numerary ranks, that they are to seize any man in 
their front, who dares to shout, or talk or fire or 
run, without orders. General Officers command- 
ing Divisions and Brigades in this army are called 
upon to see that Commanders of Regiments do their 
duties in those points. 

The Commander in Chief does not apply this 
order to all Commanders ; he well knows that 
there are abundant firstrate Soldiers, and first- 
rate Regiments in the Indian Army ; but he applies 
it to those whose Regiments are in bad order. 

K 



66 



Courts Martial. 

Subadar Davedeen Opudhya, \3th N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Rawul Pindee, 26th 
October 1849. 

Charge. — Having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 18th 
of July 1849, after having, by the report of Havildar Mok- 
hum Pande, Orderly Havildar, come to the knowledge of 
a mutiny among the men of the grenadier company, who 
had determined not to receive the pay issued to them for 
May 1849, unless it were made up to the rate of the Scinde 
pay, failed to give information thereof to his Commanding 
Officer, or to take measures for its suppression. 

Finding. — Guilty of the charge, with the exception of 
that part where he is charged with having failed to take 
measures for the suppression of the mutiny. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Confirmed. 

Recommendation to Mercy. — The Court recommends the 
prisoner to the merciful consideration of His Excellency 
the Commander in Chief. 

The Court is of opinion, that the prisoner failed through 
error of judgment to communicate to the Captain of his 
Company the report of the mutiny which had come to his 
knowledge, as the prisoner may have felt satisfied that he 
had performed his duty in making the enquiry which he 
did, and as he was unable to discover the parties concerned, 
he may have considered that a mutiny did no longer exist, 
and that it was unnecessary to communicate what he had 
heard to the Captain of the Company. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — With great pain do I reject this recom- 
mendation to mercy, because it grieves me to de- 
prive an old and hitherto worthy Officer of his 



67 



commission. But any Officer, non-commissioned 
Officer or Soldier who comes to the knowledge of, 
and conceals from his superiors, the existence of a 
mutinous spirit in any Regiment shall receive no 
mercy from me. — Head Quarters, 25th November 
1849. 



JBoabul Pande, Pay Havildar, Grenadier Company, 
13th N. I. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 26th October 1849. 

Charge. — Having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 18th 
July 1849, he being on duty at the time, and having been 
present at a mutiny among the men of the grenadier com- 
pany, who had determined not to receive the pay issued to 
them for May 1849, unless it were made up to the rate of 
Scinde pay, failed to give information thereof to his Com- 
manding Officer. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. 

Remarks by the Commander in Chief. — I can- 
not concur with the finding and sentence of the 
Court. The prisoner's time was wholly occupied 
on that day. He endeavoured to convince the 
Sepoys of their improper conduct, and failing in 
this, he desired the Orderly Havildar to report 
what was going forward to the Subadar, while he 
went for the pay to the Treasury. His having 
been wholly occupied on that day with his busi- 
ness as Pay Havildar, is confirmed by the testimony 
of Captain Whitelocke. Taking all these circum- 



68 



stances into consideration, I cannot think the 
prisoner guilty, and he is to return to his duty 
as a Havildar. — Head Quarters, 28th November 
1849. 



Havildar Mokhwn Pande, 13th JY. I. 
Tried by the same Court Martial. 

Charge. — Having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 18th 
July 1849, he being on duty at the time, and having been 
present at a mutiny among the men of the grenadier com- 
pany, who had determined not to receive the pay issued to 
them in May 1849, unless it were made up to the rate of 
Scinde pay, failed to give information thereof to his Com- 
manding Officer, although he knew that the Subadar of the 
company, to whom he did report the circumstance, took no 
measures to suppress the mutiny and made no report of it. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. 

Recommendation to Mercy. — The Court recommends the 
prisoner to the merciful consideration of His Excellency the 
Commander in Chief, on the ground that from error of 
judgment he concluded that in reporting the mutiny to the 
Subadar of his company, he had performed his duty ; and 
that there was no occasion for him to report it also to the 
Captain of his Company. 

Remarks by the Commander in Chief. — I can- 
not approve of either the finding or sentence. 
It does not appear to me that the Havildar knew 
that the Subadar had taken no steps to report to 
his superior Officer what had been reported to him 
by the prisoner. The prisoner reported what was 



69 



going forward to his Subadar, and he did this at 
once, and I therefore order him to return to his 
duty. — Head Quarters, 2Qth November 1849. 

Lieutenant Philip Moss Walmisley, \6th N. L, 
( Grenadiers.) 

Tried by General Court Martial at Fort William, 13th 
November 1849. 

Charges. — For highly unbecoming conduct, and abuse of 
his authority as commanding a detachment of his Regiment, 
in having, at Patna, on the night of the 15th of May 1849, 
(being at the time in a state of intoxication) landed a large 
portion of the detachment from the vessel on which they 
were returning to the Regiment, and marched them with 
fixed bayonets into the town of Patna, with the view of 
rescuing from the police station house two persons in con- 
finement there, who had accompanied him that evening 
into the town, and had been apprehended during a distur- 
bance there, in which Lieutenant Walmisley and them- 
selves were concerned. 

Additional Charge. — For having, on or about the 22nd 
August 1849, and on or about the 9th September 1849, 
broken his arrest, by having quitted the cantonments of 
Barrackpore, and having, on both occasions, proceeded to 
Calcutta without leave, in direct disobedience of Station 
Orders, and of the orders of the Officer commanding the 
Regiment. 

Finding. — Guilty of the first charge except as to the 
words " being at the time in a state of intoxication and 
of the additional charge except as to the second instance, 
namely, " on or about the 9th September 1849." 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. 



70 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I am bound to express my great satisfac- 
tion at the conduct of Lieutenant "White, of the 
40th Native Infantry, which was that of a steady 
and excellent Officer. I also approve of the con- 
duct of the sentry, Private Morad Allee, also of the 
40 th Native Infantry, who acted in a manner be- 
coming a Sentry and a Soldier. — Head Quarters, 
Camp, Lahore, 15th December 1849. 

The Civil Courts at Simla. 

Head Quarters, Camp, Lahore, 22nd 
December 1849. 

Doubts having arisen respecting the amenability 
of Military Officers to the Civil Courts at Simla, in 
actions of debt below the amount of four hundred 
Rupees, and much obstruction to justice and hard- 
ship to Merchants and others having been caused 
by the refusal of Military Officers to acknowledge 
the jurisdiction of the said Courts, and by the neg- 
lect of Officers commanding Regiments and Stations 
to aid the civil power in carrying out the decrees 
of these Courts, the Commander in Chief desires 
that all parties concerned shall bear in mind, that 
no one is at liberty to resist the jurisdiction of the 
Civil Courts at Simla, and that Officers dissatisfied 
with the decisions of these Courts, may appeal to 
the superior Courts on the ground of want of 
jurisdiction. 



71 



When Officers against whom decrees are given 
in the Civil Courts at Simla, return to their Regi- 
ments or Stations, the decrees will be executed 
through the ordinary civil authorities and by civil 
process, but it is the duty of the military autho- 
rities, and they are hereby most strictly enjoined 
to see, that no improper obstacles are thrown in 
the way of the Civil Officers, and to render assis- 
tance to them, whenever assistance becomes neces- 
sary. Any Commanding Officer who fails to act 
up to this injunction will be proceeded against for 
direct disobedience of orders and contempt of autho- 
rity, and the Commander in Chief warns all con- 
cerned, that the indulgence of leave to visit the 
hills on private affairs, will be withheld from any 
Officer^ who, forgetful of what is due to the 
honorable profession to which he belongs, subjects 
himself to have his conduct brought to the notice 
of superior authority for failing to pay a just 
debt. 



Lieutenant James Morphett, H. M. 53rd Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Rawul Pindee, 20th 
November 1849. 

First Charge. — For disgraceful conduct, in the following 
instances : 

1st. In having, at Lahore and Rawul Pindee, between 
the month of May 1847 and the present date, by his own 
neglect in the liquidation of a loan from the Agra and 
United Service Bank, obliged the Bank to require Lieu- 



72 



tenant Grubbe, of the 53d Foot, as surety for him, to make 
good the debt. 

2nd. In having-, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 18th 
of August 1849, falsely stated to his Commanding Officer, 
that he was provided with two sureties for the purpose of 
releasing Lieutenant Grubbe from all liability, as his surety 
for the said loan from the Agra Bank. 

3rd. In having, in a letter to the Captain of his Com- 
pany, dated 26th of August 1849, falsely stated that the 
Agra Bank had accepted and held a paper releasing Lieu- 
tenant Grubbe from all liability as his surety for the said 
loan from the Agra Bank. 

Second Charge. — For disobedience of orders, in having, 
at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 4th of September 1849, 
failed to attend at the Orderly Room, though warned to 
do so by order of the Captain of his Company. 

Third Charge. — For disgraceful conduct, in having, at 
Rawul Pindee, on the 5th September 1849, when required 
by the Commanding Officer of the Regiment to account for 
his non-attendance at the Orderly Room on the previous 
day, falsely asserted that he had not been warned ; and 
when further pressed, falsely reported that he had not been 
warned till the bugle sounded for the Orderly Sergeants. 

Fourth Charge. — For having, at Rawul Pindee, on the 
morning of the 7th of September 1849, absented himself 
from Regimental parade without leave, on the pretence of 
sickness. 

Fifth Charge. — For disobedience of the positive order of 
his Commanding Officer, repeatedly delivered to him, in 
having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 7th September 
1849, failed to report, through a Medical Officer, his in- 
ability to attend parade on that day, when absent upon 
the plea of illness. 



73 



Finding. — First charge, 1st instance, Not Guilty; 2nd and 
3rd instances, Guilty ; second charge, Not Guilty ; third, 
fourth and fifth charges, Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, Camp Lahore, 10th December 1849. 



Private Lawrence McNamara, H. M. 80th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Dinapore, 22nd 
November 1849. 

Charges. — 1st. Having absented himself from barracks 
without leave, after hours, and not having returned until 
brought back by an escort, the following morning, when he 
was drunk ; 2nd, having, struck with his clenched fist and 
offered violence to Sergeant John Torsey, in the execution 
of his office. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for seven years. — Approved 
and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I cannot pass by the above sentence with- 
out the most positive prohibition of the extraor- 
dinary practice, which it seems prevails in Her 
Majesty's 80th Regiment, of sending out non-com- 
missioned Officers, without the assistance of 
Privates, to apprehend offenders at a distance from 
the barracks. — Head Quarters, Comp Lahore, 10th 
December 1849. 

Shaich Ahmed, Subadar, 6\st JY. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 15th De- 
cember 1849. 

L 



74 



Charge. — For conduct highly unbecoming a Native 
commissioned Officer, at Govindgurh, in the following 
instances : 

1st. In having, during the months of September and 
October 1849, connived at, and permitted, an unjust divi- 
sion of duty among the Sepoys of the 2nd company of the 
Regiment, and in having, on remonstrances being made, 
used abusive and threatening language to the complainants. 

2nd. In having, on the 22nd October 1849, conducted 
himself with great disrespect at a European Court of 
Inquiry, by falsely declaring, that Captain J. C. Innes, 
61st Regiment, the President of the Court, was not correctly 
recording the statement of one of the witnesses, insinuating 
that the whole Court was prejudiced against him, and de- 
claring that he would reply to the complaints which had 
been preferred against him at a Court composed of Native 
Officers. 

3rd. In having, on or about the 4th of November 1849, 
sent to his Commanding Officer, Major J. Macdonald, a 
Persian petition containing false imputations of harsh and 
oppressive acts stated to have been committed by Major 
Macdonald, and impugning his justice in the disposal of 
offences. 

Finding. — Preamble, Guilty; 1st and 2nd instances, Not 
Guilty ; 3rd instance, Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for two months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I cannot help thinking that the prisoner is 
a well meaning Officer, but of an irascible temper, 
which, in my opinion, has been improperly tried. 
The President of the Court of Inquiry appears to 



75 



have been as irascible as the prisoner, and with 
less cause. 

The Adjutant ought not to have left the room for 
a private conference with Perrowtee. The act was 
an innocent one, but it was calculated to cast 
doubts into the mind of the prisoner that he had 
not fair treatment, and this ought to have been 
avoided. 

I recommend the prisoner to keep his temper 
more under command, or it will assuredly lead him 
into trouble. — Head Quarters, Camp, 2Qth Decem- 
ber 1849. 



Pur sun, Drummer, 10£A N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lucknow, 17th De- 
cember 1849. 

Charge. — Wilful murder of his wife Sooneea by cutting 
off her head with a knife. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Death by hanging. — Approved and con- 
firmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, 26th December 1849. 



Private Thomas Sallone, H. M. 9th Lancers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Wuzeerabad, 2nd 
November 1849. 

Charges. — 1st. Being drunk when on inlying picquet; 
2nd, Having made away with or lost regimental clothing 
and necessaries ; 3rd, Having offered violence to his supe- 
rior Officer, Brevet Major R. A. Yule, H. M. 9th Lancers, 
by throwing his cap at him, he being in the execution of 



7G 



his duty ; 4th, Having made use of highly insubordinate 
and threatening language towards Brevet Major R. A. 
Yule, saying " that he could punch his head," or words to 
that effect. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — (Previous convictions and general bad cha- 
racter taken into consideration) Transportation for life. 

Revised. — I think the sentence is too severe. — 
Head Quarters, 18th November 1849. 

Court adheres to its former sentence. — Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I remit that portion of the sentence which 
exceeds seven (7) years. The extreme youth of 
the criminal, and the most ill-timed and injudicious 
remarks made upon the prisoner in presence of his, 
Major Yule's, superior Officer, provoked the crime 
for which he has been justly condemned. The 
Court ought not to have called on Major Yule for 
the prisoner's character. — Head Quarters, Camp 
Lahore, 10th December 1849. 



Hewunchul Patuck, Subadar, 22nd N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Rawul Pindee, 20th 
December 1849. 

Charge. — For having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 
12th of July 1849, after having come to the knowledge of 
a mutiny among the men of No. 4 company, who had de- 
termined not to receive the pay issued to them for May 
1849, unless it were made up to the rate of Scinde pay, 
failed to give information thereof to his Commanding Officer. 



77 



Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, 26th December 1849. 

Sewdeen Awustee, Subadar, 22nd iV. /. 
Tried by the same Court Martial. 

Charge. — For having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 
12th of July 1849, after having come to the knowledge of a 
mutiny among the men of No. 5 company, who had deter- 
mined not to receive the pay issued to them for May 
1849, unless it were made up to the rate of Scinde pay, 
failed to give information thereof to his Commanding 
Officer. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Disapproved, but confirmed. 

Remarks. — I consider that this Court has been 
improperly conducted by the Deputy Judge Advo- 
cate General, and I shall report him to the Gover- 
nor General. — Head Quarters, Camp, 26th Decem- 
ber 1849. 

Jemadar Ram Sing, 22nd N. I. 
Tried by the same Court Martial. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Rawul Pindee, on or 
about the 13th of July 1849, when pay was to be issued to 
the Regiment (he having been at the time pay Havildar and 
orderly Havildar of the light company) purposely ordered 
the men of the company to disperse from the lines about 
the time they were required to receive their pay, and having 
falsely reported to Captain Hunt, commanding the com- 
pany, when told to assemble the men, that they had dis- 
persed on their own business, and could not then be col- 
lected. 



7S 



2nd. For having, at Rawul Pindee, on the 14th of Oc- 
tober 1849, made very unbecoming remarks to Seetul Te- 
vvaree, Sepoy, of the light company 22nd Native Infantry, 
regarding Havildars Ghassee Khan and Mygul Khan, of 
the light company, who had given evidence, on the preced- 
ing day, at a Court of Inquiry then held at Rawul Pindee, 
to the effect of the 1st charge. 

Finding. — 1st charge, Guilty, 2nd charge, Not Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for three months. — Disapproved, but confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, Camp, 26th December 1849. 



Byjnath Ternary No. 56, and Byjnath Tewaree No. 72, 
Havildars, No. 1 Company, 22nd N. I. 
Tried by the same Court Martial. 

Charge. — For having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 
13th of July 1849, they having been present at a mutiny 
among the men of No. 1 company, who had determined 
not to receive the pay issued to them for May 1849, unless 
it were made up to the rate of Scinde pay, failed to give 
information thereof to their Commanding Officer. 

Finding. — Byjnath Tewaree No. 72, Guilty ; Byjnath 
Tewaree No. 56, Not Guilty. 

Sentence. — On Byjnath Tewaree No. 72, Dismissal from 
the service. — Disapproved, but confirmed as regards Byj- 
nath Tewaree No. 56; Confirmed as regards Byjnath 
Tewaree No. 72. — Head Quarters, Camp, 26th December 
1849. 

The Mutineers of the 22nd N. I. 
Before the same Court Martial, on the 21st day of 
December 1849, Hunooman Misser No. 310, Oudon Sing 



79 



No. 334, Bekharee Sing No. 405, Punchum Sing No. 
418, and Nund Kessore Tewarree No. 439, Sepoys of the 
grenadier company; Dumbur Sing No. 707, Kalka Sing 
No. 665, Bhugga Ram No. 658, and Heera Ram No. 
623, Sepoys of No. 1 company ; Bundun Sing No. 270, 
Sepoy of No. 4 company ; Sheckdeen Mahomed No. 272, 
Sheckh Madar Bux No. 345, Sewruttun Tewarree No. 
621, and Ujroil Ram No. 674, Sepoys of No. 5 company; 
and Kalee Deen Tewarree No. 615, of No. 6 company; 
all Sepoys of the 22nd Regiment Native Infantry, were 
arraigned on the following charge : 

For having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 13th of 
July 1849, begun, excited, and joined in a mutiny in their 
respective companies, having declared their own determi- 
nation, and induced other Sepoys to determine, not to 
receive the pay issued to them for May 1849, unless it 
were made up to the rate of Scinde pay. 

Finding. — The Court, from the evidence before it, finds 
the prisoners Hunooman Misser No. 310, Oudon Sing 
No. 334, Bekharee Sing No. 405, Punchum Sing No. 418, 
and Nund Kessore Tewarree No. 439, Sepoys of the 
grenadier company; Dumbur Sing No. 707, Kalka Sing 
No. 665, Bhugga Ram No. 658, and Heera Ram No. 623, 
Sepoys of No. 1 company; and Bundun Sing No. 270, 
Sepoy of No. 4 company, guilty of the charge. 

The Court finds Sheckdeen Mahomed No. 272, Sheckh 
Madar Bux No. 345, Sewruttun Tewarree No. 621, and 
Ujroil Ram No. 674, Sepoys of No. 5 company, and Kalee 
Deen Tewarree No. 615, Sepoy of No. 6 company, guilty of 
the charge to the extent of " having joined in a mutiny in 
their respective companies, having declared their own 
determination not to receive the pay issued to them for 
May 1849, unless it were made up to the rate of Scinde 



80 



pay," but the Court finds them not guilty of the remainder 
of the charge. 

Sentence. — The Court sentences Hunooman Misser No. 
310, Oudon Sing No. 334, Bekharee Sing No. 405, 
Punchum Sing No. 418, and Nund Kessore Tewarree 
No. 439, Sepoys of the grenadier company ; Dumbur Sing 
No. 707, Kalka Sing No. 665, Bhugga Ram No. 658, and 
Heera Ram No. 623, Sepoys of No. 1 company; and 
Bundun Sing No. 270, Sepoy of No. 4 company, all of 
the 22nd Regiment Native Infantry, to suffer inprison- 
ment with hard labor for the term of four (4) calendar 
months. 

The Court sentences Sheckdeen Mahomed No. 272, 
Sheckh Madar Bux No. 345, Sewruttun Tewarree No. 
621, and Ujroil Ram No. 674, Sepoys of No. 5 company; 
and Kalee Deen Tewarree No. 615, Sepoy of No. 6 com- 
pany, all of the 22nd Regiment Native Infantry, to be 
dismissed the service. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, Camp, 26th December 1849. 

Private Thomas McTeague, H. M. 9th Lancers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Wuzeerabad, 16th 
December 1849 ; 

Charges. — 1st, Absence without leave after being warn- 
ed for night guard ; 2nd, Losing or making away with 
regimental clothing and necessaries ; 3rd, Ditto a jacket, 
the property of Private W. Rimell ; 4th, Discharging a 
loaded pistol at Private Charles Wood ; 5th, Making use 
of threatening language to Sergeant George Andrews, 
using the words " I had the pistol loaded three days for your 
nut." 

Finding.— 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 5th charges, Guilty ; 4th 
charge, Not Guilty. 



81 



Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year, with solitary con- 
finement for fourteen days in the second, fourth, sixth, 
eighth, tenth and twelfth months, and to be put under 
stoppages till the deficiencies of regimental clothing and 
necessaries be made good. 

Revised Sentence. — As before, with the addition of stop- 
pages for Private Rimell's jacket. — Approved and confirm- 
ed. — Head Quarters, 26th December 1849. 

Runjeet Sing, Pay Hacildar, Grenadier Company 
32nd JST. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Wuzeerabad, 5th 
January, 1850. 

Charges. — First. For having, at Wuzeerabad, on the 
evening of the 16th December 1849, when he came to the 
knowledge of an intended mutiny in the Regiment to refuse 
to receive pay at the ordinary rate, made no endeavours to 
suppress it, and failed to give information thereof to his 
Commanding Officer. 

Second. For having, at Wuzeerabad, on the 18th De- 
cember 1849, at a Court of Inquiry, before which he was 
examined, given unwilling evidence, and prevaricated in 
his evidence respecting the combination in the Regiment 
to refuse pay, and falsely stated that Havildar Gyan Sing, 
of the grenadier company, was present on the evening of 
the 16th December 1849, when an attempt was made to 
excite the men of that company to refuse their pay. 

Finding. — 1st charge, Guilty; 2nd charge, Guilty, with 
the exception of the words " and falsely stated that Havil- 
" dar Gyan Sing, of the grenadier company, was present 
" on the evening of the 16th December 1849, when an at- 
" tempt was made to excite the men of that company to 
" refuse their pay," of which the Court acquits him. 

M 



82 



Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — It is almost superfluous to say how pain- 
ful it is to confirm the sentence of dismissal from 
the service of this old and hitherto excellent non- 
commissioned Officer. To the President and Mem- 
bers of the Court it must have been equally dis- 
tressing to condemn an old comrade : they have 
done their painful duty like honorable Soldiers, I 
will do mine in a like manner ; and let it be known 
to this army, that I will pardon no man against 
whom it shall appear, that he concealed from his 
immediate superiors the existence of a mutinous 
spirit among his comrades, whether European or 
Native, whether Officer, non-commissioned Officer, 
or private Soldier. I have seen most of the armies 
in the world, and I have never seen one that is 
better paid, or better cared for, than the army of 
the East India Company ; neither have I ever 
seen a more obedient, more honorable army, and 
I will not allow a few discontented, malignant 
scoundrels to disgrace their Colours and their Regi- 
ments, by an insolent attempt to dictate to their 
Government, what pay that Government shall give 
Soldiers, towards whom it has always been both 
just and generous. The Government had, tem- 
porarily, and with great generosity, given a higher 
rate of pay to those Soldiers who served in the 



83 



Pimjaub during the late war ; this was a gra- 
tuitous reward to them for the privations incident 
to a campaign ; and, because the Government did 
generously give this temporary increase of pay to 
those Kegiments serving in the Punjaub, some 
mutinous villains have had the insolence to demand 
the continuation of such pay, when the Punjaub 
has become a province of the British territory ! 
Woe be to those who so dare to disgrace their Eegi- 
ments ! "Woe to those who, forgetting their duties 
as Soldiers of the State, conceal the infamous con- 
duct of mutineers ! A Havildar, Kunjeet Sing, 
has done this in the 32nd Native Infantry, and for 
which misconduct on the part of the Havildar, 
forty years' good service have passed by him as 
the wind ! Instead of an . honored old Soldier 
retiring with credit from a service, of which he 
was one of the pillars and the pride, he is 
cast from it, dishonored and pensionless, by the 
just sentence of an honorable Court Martial. — 
Head Quarters, Camp, Rhotas, IWi January 
1850. 



Shaik Golam Hossein, Jemadar, 32nd JY. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Wuzeerabad, 1st 
January 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Borrowing twenty rupees from a Sepoy; 
2nd, Accepting bribes from Sepoys for appointment to a 
recruiting party. 

Finding. — 1st charge, Guilty; 2nd charge, Not Guilty. 



84 



Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for one month. 

By the Commander in Chief. — I cannot agree 
with the Court. I see no evidence on the defence to 
rebut the evidence given in support of the prose- 
cution. I therefore revise the proceedings, and 
beg that the Court will re-consider its finding and 
sentence, which last I also consider much too leni- 
ent for the disobedience of orders of which the pri- 
soner has been found guilty. — Head Quarters, 
Camp, Rhotas, 12th January 1850. 

Revised finding . — The Court, having carefully re-consi- 
dered their former finding, beg respectfully to adhere 
to the same, as they do not consider the testimonies of 
Kudernauth Dhobee and Dwarkah Panday, Sepoys, of 
sufficient weight to convict the prisoner of the second 
charge ; these witnesses being the parties who are alleged 
to have given the bribes cited in that charge, and their 
statements being the only evidence against the prisoner. — 
Head Quarters, Camp, Rhotas, \2th January 1850. 

Revised Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Con- 
firmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — In consideration of the long services of the 
prisoner, I will commute his sentence to suspension 
from rank, pay and allowances for six months. — 
Head Quarters, Camp, 16th January 1850. 

Meer Rujub Allee, Camp Follower. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Neemuch, 29th 
December 1849. 



85 



Charges. — Assaulting and wounding Kookee, a native 
woman, with a sword, with intent to murder her; 2nd, Dis- 
charging a pistol at and wounding Punna, a native 
woman, with intent to murder her. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labor for fourteen 
years. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, 
16th January 1850. 



Lieutenant Edward Cookson, 68th W. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Delhi, 11th January 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having gone to the mess of the Re- 
giment in a state of intoxication, at Delhi, on the evening 
of the 2nd of December 1849, and there conducted him- 
self in a highly unbecoming manner. 

2nd. For having gone to the mess of the Regiment, at 
breakfast, in a state of intoxication, at Delhi, on the morn- 
ing of the 4th of December 1849, and there endeavoured 
to provoke Ensign Alexander, of the same Regiment, into 
a quarrel with him. 

3rd. For having gone to the mess of the Regiment in a 
state of intoxication, at Delhi, on the evening of the 4th of 
December 1849, and dressed in a shooting jacket, in direct 
disobedience of Regimental Orders, dated Delhi, 17th No- 
vember 1849. 

4th. For having, at Delhi, on the 6th of December 
1849, behaved with imbecoming levity and great disrespect 
to a Regimental Court of Inquiry assembled to inquire into 
his conduct, as alleged in the foregoing charges; Lieutenant 
Cookson being at the time under the influence of drink. 

5th. For having attended the same Court of Inquiry, at 
Delhi, on the 8th December 1849, in a state of intoxication. 



86 



6th. For having, at Delhi, on the 12th of December 
1849, broken his arrest, and proceeded to the mess house 
of the Regiment and to the tent of Ensign Montagu on the 
same premises. 

7th. For having, at the same time and place, conducted 
himself outrageously towards Lieutenant and Adjutant 
Gibbs, of the same Regiment ; threatening him with perso- 
nal violence when endeavouring to persuade him, Lieute- 
nant Cookson, to return to his own quarters : for having 
shortly afterwards proceeded in a shameful state of intoxi- 
cation to the house of Captain Bryant, of the same corps, 
and thence, in the same state, proceeded to the tent of 
Ensign Montagu, of the same corps, where he behaved 
with much violence and subjected himself to the disgrace 
of being taken back to his own quarters by force, under a 
guard of the Regiment. 

Finding. — 1st charge, Guilty, with the exception of the 
words " having gone to the mess of the Regiment in a state 
of intoxication," which the Court do not consider proved ; 
the other charges, Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be dismissed the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, Attock, 26th January 
1850. 

Beer vs. Rum.* 

Head Quarters, Camp, Akora, 20th January 1850. 

The Commander in Chief will hold Commanding Officers 
of corps responsible that the intentions of Government, as 

* Government had issued a notification designed to encourage the use 
of malt liquors in supersession of ardent spirits. The price of Rum 
supplied to Canteens was reduced from Rupees 2 to Annas 13-4 per 
gallon, but the liquor being still retailed at the old price of one anna 
a dram, the difference, Rupees 1-2-8 per gallon, between the old and new 
rates, is to be laid out in reducing the retail price of Porter, Ale and Beer. 



87 



specified in the General Order by the Honorable the Pre- 
sident in Council, dated the 11th ultimo, are strictly and 
judiciously fulfilled, as far as circumstances and the position 
of Regiments will admit. 

With reference to paragraph 5 of the Government Order, 
His Excellency directs that when it may not be possible 
for detachments of Europeans of the Honorable Company's 
Army to obtain malt liquor, at a rate within the means of 
the Soldier, the difference of price accumulated on the sale 
of Rum, or such portion of the same as is considered 
necessary, may be laid out, at the discretion of the Officer 
commanding the detachment, in providing carriage for the 
transport of the wives and families of the men, or otherwise 
in adding to the comfort of the Soldiers ; a report in each 
case of the amount so expended, and the purpose to which 
the money has been applied, being made to the Adjutant 
General of the Army, for the information of the Com- 
mander in Chief. 

At the termination of the march, should any surplus 
funds remain unappropriated, they are to be divided, rate- 
ably according to the number of men, amongst the several 
corps of which the detachment is composed, and remitted 
to Commanding Officers, to be carried to the credit of the 
different Regimental Canteen Funds. 

Courts Martial. 

Shaick Fucqueera Bux, Dulmust Khan, and Hemnarain 
Sing, Sepoys, 32nd 2V. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Wuzeerabad, 7th 
January 1850. # 

Charge. — For having, at Wuzeerabad, on the 16th 
December 1849, began and excited a mutiny in their Regi- 
ment, they having instigated the men of their own and 



88 



other companies to bind themselves by an oath not to 
accept the pay which was to be issued to them on the fol- 
lowing day ; in consequence of which, when pay was being 
issued on the day following, several Sepoys of the Regiment 
mutinously refused their pay. 

Additional charge against Shaick Fucqueera Bux, Se- 
jjoij. — For having, at the time and place stated in the first 
charge, quitted his guard without leave, when on duty at 
the quarter guard, and proceeded towards the tent of the 4th 
company, for the purpose of exciting his comrades to 
refuse their pay. 

Finding. — Dulmust Khan and Hemnarain Sing, Guilty, 
with the exception of the word " their own and Shaick 
Fucqueera Bux, Guilty of both charges, with the exception 
of the words " and other companies." 

Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labor for fourteen 
years. 

By the Commander in Chief. — I revise the sen- 
tence. I call on this Court Martial to do its duty 
to the State. It has found the prisoners guilty of 
having " begun and excited a mutiny in their 
Regi?nent" ; of an infamous attempt to dictate to 
the Government what amount of pay it should give 
to the Soldiers of the 32 nd Eegiment of Native 
Infantry ! 

These prisoners had voluntarily enlisted in the 
service of the East India Company for a certain 
fixed rate of pay ; they swore to serve that Com- 
pany for that rate of # pay. When food becomes 
dear the Government generously pays the extra 
expense when above a certain reasonable price, so 



89 



that the Sepoy may not suffer when his duty takes 
him into provinces of the empire where circum- 
stances make food increase in price. The Sepoy is 
found in clothing, in lodging, in pay beyond what 
he could earn were he not a Sepoy. He is also 
honorably treated in every way. Should a Sepoy 
commit any serious crime, his punishment is, ordi- 
narily, simply dismissal from this noble army ; and 
the dread of such a misfortune reigns in the bosom 
of every Sepoy ! What higher compliment can be 
paid by Soldiers to their Government? What 
greater proof can be offered of that Government's 
justice and generosity? None! The nobleness of 
the Sepoy army, and the advantages which it 
enjoys are known to the whole world: pensions for 
long service ; pensions for wounds received in bat- 
tle; pensions to the bereaved families of those 
whose gallant fathers have fallen in action; in- 
creased pay for service to those who are yet robust 
and fit to do duty ; Orders of Merit and medals for 
valour in fight ; hospitals for the sick ; and, finally, 
these excellent Soldiers are led by European Offi- 
cers, all proud of, and glorying in their men! 
These are all great advantages. They crowd on 
the mind of the Sepoy who reflects upon the con- 
duct of the generous Government which he serves : 
his reason and his heart make him true to those 
glorious standards under which he and his father 
have ever fought and conquered? I ask the Offi- 

N 



90 



cers composing this Court Martial, whether they, 
as honorable Soldiers, think that 14 years' impri- 
sonment, with hard labor, is an adequate punish- 
ment for the ruffians whom this Court has, itself, 
convicted of trying to subvert that order, that 
discipline, that justice, that generosity, (which the 
Court well knows I have described without exag- 
geration) and thus turn the whole into dire confu- 
sion and despair, depriving veterans of their pen- 
sions, widows and orphans of their support, and 
the good Sepoys of the 32nd Native Infantry of 
their pay, by forcing the Government to strike this 
brave Regiment from the service of the East India 
Company for ever? For this must have happened 
if the machinations of these culprits had succeeded ? 
The prisoners, like infamous agitators as they are, 
have been convicted by the Court of having gone 
from company to company exciting their comrades 
to mutiny and administering unlawful oaths ; and 
I revise the sentence passed upon them, as 
inadequate to the magnitude of their crime. I 
beg of the Court to re-consider its sense of the 
consequences which may result from the crime of 
these heinous offenders. Let it sentence a punish- 
ment commensurate with their damnable projects. 
— Head Quarters, Camp, lGth January 1850. 

Revised sentence. — Death by hanging. — Approved and 
confirmed. 



91 



Ram Sohaie Misr and Nowrung, Sepoys, 32nd N. I. 
Tried by the same Court Martial as above, 21st January 
1850. 

Charge. — Having taken part with Dulmust Khan and 
Hemnarain Sing, and begun and excited a mutiny among 
their comrades. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Death by hanging. — Approved and Con- 
firmed. 

Remarks applying to both the above Courts Mar- 
tial. — These five men have been justly sentenced to 
die, but I commute their sentence into that of 
transportation for life. In eternal exile they will 
expiate their crimes. For ever separated from 
their country and their relations, in a strange land 
beyond the Seas, they will linger out their misera- 
ble lives ! It is a change, but I do not consider this 
to be an amelioration of their punishment : they 
will remain living examples of the terrible fate 
which awaits traitors to their colours ! — Head 
Quarters, Camp, 25th January 1850. 

Private George Thomas, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 12th January 
1850. 

Charge. — Insubordinate and mutinous conduct ; violent 
demeanour ; obscene and mutinous language ; destroying 
clothing. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years with solitary 
confinement for the last fourteen days of the 2nd, 4th, 8th, 



02 



10th and 12th months of each year, and to be put under 
stoppages for clothing destroyed. — Approved and confirmed. 
— Head Quarters, Camp, 19 th January 1850. 



Ressaldar Mirza Ameer Beg, 5th Irregular Cavalry. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Bareilly, 7th Janu- 
ary 1850. 

Charge. — Highly unbecoming conduct, instanced in over- 
charges for horses, and in false statements to conceal such 
overcharges. 

Additional Charge. — Conduct highly unbecoming and 
disgraceful to a commissioned Officer, in making false 
complaints against his superior Officers, and sending a 
petition to the Commander in Chief through irregular 
channels. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, 30th January 1850. 

Ressaldar Meer Syud Khan, 13th Irregular Cavalry. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Rawul Pindee, 23rd 
January 1850. 

Charge. — Conduct disgraceful to a commissioned Officer, 
in attempting to defraud the Government by falsely stating 
that he had made advances to ten alleged recruits, and in 
procuring false acknowledgments for such advances. 

Finding. — Guilty, except as to four of the alleged 
recruits. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service and forfeiture of 
arrears. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, 
30th January 1850. 



93 



Kote Duffadar Syud Ameer Khan, Ylth Irregular Cavalry. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 24th January 1850. 

Charge. — Disgraceful conduct in obtaining and attempt- 
ing to obtain the false acknowledgments referred to in 
the foregoing case. (Pleaded Guilty.) 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service and forfeiture of 
arrears. — Head Quarters, Camp, 30th January 1850. 

Gunner Hugh Mclnnis, 3rd Company 1st Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Peshawur, 24th 
January 1850. 

Charge. — Having feloniously and unlawfully killed 
Salaroo, camp follower, by throwing a tent peg at his 
head. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year. — Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I only confirm this sentence, because I 
think it too lenient. — Head Quarters, Camp, 2nd 
February 1850. 

Private Michael Kennedy, H. M. 18th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 8th Janu- 
ary 1850. 

Charge. — Discharging a loaded fowling piece at Sohab 
Sing, Sepoy, and wounding him in the head, with intention 
to do him some grievous bodily harm. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I consider that the whole of this has arisen 



94 



from Private Kennedy's having been drunk, and I 
desire that his Commanding Officer do take such 
measures of severity towards this Soldier, as may 
teach him that he is not to disgrace the name of 
Her Majesty's 18th Regiment in future. By " mea- 
sures of severity" I mean, that he should receive 
none of those indulgences that are granted to good 
and well conducted Soldiers until his future con- 
duct is more becoming. — Head Quarters, Camp, 
23rd January 1850. 

Private Michael Sheehan, H. M. 18 th Foot. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 9th January 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Discharging a loaded fowling piece at 
Sohab Sing, Sepoy, 2nd, Assaulting Nehal Sing, Sepoy, 
and striking him with a fowling piece. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Commanding Officer is desired to 
refuse all indulgence to this Soldier, as well as to 
Private Kennedy, till he learns not to disgrace his 
Regiment and the service by drunkenness. — Head 
Quarters, Camp, 2?>rd January 1850. 

The Expedition against the Affredies. 

Head Quarters, Camp, Peshawur, 16th 
February 1850. 
The Affredie tribe inhabiting the mountain range, 
which separates Peshawur from Kohat, received 
certain sums of money from our Government to 



95 



protect the communications between the above- 
mentioned towns. Instead of doing so, they, on 
the 2nd instant, assembled in great numbers ; fell 
by surprise on a detachment of Sappers and Miners, 
peacefully employed in repairing the road over the 
pass at Kohat, and massacred these unoffending 
Soldiers. 

Such treacherous and sanguinary conduct re- 
quired chastisement, and it also became necessary 
to reinforce the post at Kohat, which by the insur- 
rection of these AfFredie tribes, was cut off and 
placed in danger. 

The Commander in Chief therefore marched to 
reinforce Kohat and punish the Affredie tribe, 
which objects have been effected by Sir Colin 
Campbell, commanding the troops, and by Lieute- 
nant Colonel Lawrence, commanding the civil force. 
The able manner in which both these Officers made 
their respective arrangements demands this public 
expression of the Commander in Chief's approba- 
tion. The admirable practice made by the artil- 
lery, in dislodging the enemy from the height, does 
much credit to Lieutenant Colonel Fordyce and 
those under his orders. Lieutenant Colonel 
Bradshaw commanded the advanced guard, both 
in going to and returning from Kohat, and that 
excellent Officer exhibited as thorough a knowledge 
of his duties as he did when he commanded the 
attack on the Eusofye country. Lieutenant 



96 



Colonel Corfield in returning, and Major Piatt in 
advancing to Kohat, commanding the rear guards, 
distinguished themselves by the cool judgment and 
skill with which they repulsed the attacks of an 
active enemy ; in short, the Officers, non-commis- 
sioned Officers and Privates composing this mov- 
able column did their work admirably. 

The fighting and labor fell upon those who had 
to scale the precipices, to secure the camp, and 
when marching, to protect the front, flanks and 
rear of the column, while passing, twice, through 
a dangerous defile of 13 miles in length, under a 
constant fire from matchlockmen. 

The personal activity and intrepid conduct of 
those, whose good fortune gave them the opportu- 
nity of thus distinguishing themselves, in sight of 
their companions in arms, excited the admiration 
of the Commander in Chief, and added one more 
proof to those on record, that wild undisciplined 
mountaineers have but little chance of success when 
opposed to disciplined battalions. It is said that, 
in making this march to Kohat, Runjeet Sing lost 
a thousand men ; the Commander in Chief does not 
know whether this story is correct or not, but 
Brigadier Sir Colin Campbell has lost but twenty, 
nor was there one bit of baggage taken by our 
enemies, though they are renowned for being the 
most daring and dexterous plunderers in the world ! 
It is right that young military men should notice 



97 



these facts, because they teach practically the vast 
power of discipline, against which mountains and 
plains and rivers and jungles all cease to be insu- 
perable obstacles. 

The Commander in Chief cannot close this order 
without expressing his deep sorrow for the gallant 
men who have fallen. No Soldier ever died on the 
field of battle more gloriously than young Sitwell, 
of the 31st Native Infantry, and the self-devoted 
Soldiers Havildar Golab Ditchit, Naick Macldoo 
Sing, and Sepoys Meerwan Opadiah and Deebund 
Pandy, who fell in trying to save their wounded 
Officer, although this heroic young man called upon 
them to leave him and save themselves, which they 
refused to do, and died with him : Europeans and 
Natives must alike feel proud of these noble men ! 

The brave Lieutenant Hilliard, of the 23rd Native 
Infantry, and his small band, equally sustained the 
honor of the Indian Army, and though this valiant 
Officer's wound is severe, there is reason to hope 
that he, and the rest of the wounded, will in time 
be restored to their duties. 

As Captain Coke and the 1st Punjaub Regiment 
of Infantry do not belong to the regular force, but 
sustained the brunt of the skirmishing, the Com- 
mander in Chief thinks it due to this admirable 
young corps and its excellent leader, to say, that 
their conduct called forth the applause of the whole 
column. Lieutenant Colonel Lawrence is therefore 

o 



98 



requested to communicate this order to Captain 
Coke. 



Head Quarters, Camp, Pubbee, 18th 
February 1850. 
The Commander in Chief put Bucktour Khan, 
Jemadar, of the rifle company of the 31st Regiment 
of Native Infantry, in arrest, for allowing his men 
to fire without orders, when the force employed 
against the Aftredie tribe was attacked by the 
enemy on the morning of the 13th instant. He also 
ordered one or two Sepoys of that company to be 
confined. 

His Excellency's own escort of the 2nd Irregular 
Cavalry, also fired without orders, and he intended 
to have brought the whole party to trial for this 
disgraceful action. Not only did they fire without 
orders, but the enemy was at the time out of reach 
of their fire-arms. The firing of these men was 
therefore an act of cowardice. 

However in consideration of the gallant conduct 
shown by the force, and especially by the 31st 
Native Infantry, Sir Charles Napier will for once 
pass over the bad conduct of these men, and Lieute- 
nant Colonel Corfield will be so good as to return 
to Jemadar Bucktour Khan his sword, giving him 
and the Sepoys who fired, who are now to be 
released from confinement, a severe caution against 
similar misbehaviour in future. 



99 



Courts Martial. 

Captain James Townshend Daniell, 47 th JV. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 2nd 
February 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For direct and wilful disobedience of 
General Orders, dated 21st December 1820 and 30th De- 
cember 1823, in being at the present time under pecuniary 
obligation for money borrowed from a Native Officer, he, 
Captain Daniell, having at Benares, on or about the 1st of 
January 1844, borrowed of (the late) Mudaree Roy, Suba- 
dar, of the 47th Regiment Native Infantry, the sum of one 
thousand Rupees, which sum at the present time remains 
unpaid. 

2nd. For disrespect to Lieutenant Colonel Hicks, C. B., 
commanding the 47th Regiment Native Infantry, in having, 
at Cawnpore, on the 24th of November 1849, taken no 
notice of a letter No. 231, of that date, addressed to him 
by the Adjutant of the Regiment, by order of Lieutenant 
Colonel Hicks, and requiring from him an explanation of 
his debt to the late Subadar Mudaree Roy. 

Finding. — 1st charge Guilty, with the exception of the 
word " wilful 2nd charge Not Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be severely reprimanded in such manner 
as His Excellency the Commander in Chief may please to 
direct. — Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I am sorry that it is my duty to reprimand 
an old Officer, and to think that he deserves the 
sentence passed upon him, and which I consider to 
be too lenient. I am quite ready to believe that 
Captain Daniell was not aware of the order, that 



100 



European Officers should not borrow money from 
Native Officers, but the answer to this feeble excuse 
is two-fold. First, it is an order of such a nature 
as to be a matter for regret that it should be re- 
quired ! And secondly, it is an order of high im- 
portance to discipline : to be ignorant of such an 
order is inexcusable in a Captain of the army. 

I approve of Lieutenant Colonel Hicks' con- 
duct ; that Officer did his duty in reporting to me 
the conduct of Captain Daniell. 

Captain Daniell must pay the money borrowed 
before he is released from his arrest. — Head Quar- 
ters, Camp, 20th February 1850. 

Gunner John Scanlan, 4th Company 3rd Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Ferozepore, 14th 
February, 1850. 

Charges. — Drunkenness ; threatening and most insubor- 
dinate language. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for nine months, with solitary 
confinement for the first 14 days of the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 
9th months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the, Commander in 
Chief. — I refer the Commanding Officer of Artil- 
lery to the General Order, 16th. March 1835.*— 
Head Quarters, Camp, 23rd February 1850. 



* The Eight Honorable the Commander in Chief calls upon Officers 
Commanding European Corps and Detachments, to prohibit their Non- 



101 



Disbanding- of the 66th N, I. 

Head Quarters, Camp, Janee ke Sung, 27th 
February 1850. 

In the remarks made by the Commander in Chief on the 
Court Martial which sentenced the prisoners of the 32nd 
Native Infantry, Sir Charles Napier said, that the culprits 
were convicted of trying " to deprive veterans of their pen- 
sions, widows and orphans of their support, and the good 
Sepoys of the 32nd Native Infantry of their pay, by forcing 
the Government to strike this brave Regiment from the 
service of the East India Company for ever, for this must 
have happened had the machinations of the culprits 
succeeded." 

With the Soldiers of the 66th Regiment they have 
succeeded, and the Commander in Chief has resolved to 
use the powers entrusted to him by the Governor General. 
The Native Officers, non-commissioned Officers and Pri- 
vate Sepoys of the 66th Regiment are to be marched to 
Umballah, and there struck off from the service of the 
Honorable East India Company; and His Excellency 

Commissioned Officers from taking any other part in the confinement of 
drunken offenders than the ordering an escort of Privates to place them 
in restraint. Where the Non-Commissioned Officer, instead of avoiding, 
comes prominently forward into collision with the irritated drunkard, 
violence is generally the consequence, and the offence of the culprit 
swells to so great an extent as to demand the Sentence of a General 
Court Martial ; whereas, were the Non-Commissioned Officer to keep 
aloof, and direct his subordinates to perform their duty, the milder 
punishments awardable by a Commanding Officer or a Regimental Court 
Martial, woidd generally suffice for the guilt already committed. 

All men confined for drunkenness, should, if possible, be confined by 
themselves, in the Congee House, until sober, and not in the Guard 
Room, where they are often teazed and provoked to acts of violence and 
insubordination. 



102 



directs that the Colors of the 66th are to be delivered over 
to the brave and loyal men of the Nusseree Goorka Batta- 
lion, and that the 66th Regiment shall in future be denomi- 
nated the 66th or Goorka Regiment. 

The mutineers of the 66th have brought down ruin and 
disgrace upon the Regiment ! When a mutinous corps 
has endeavoured to seize a Fortress, which a confiding 
Government believed it had entrusted to faithful Soldiers, 
it is time that vengeance should fall upon the whole. 

The Commander in Chief has carefully read the proceed- 
ings of the Court of Inquiry, held at Govindgurh on the 3rd 
instant. He has also read the proceedings of the Court 
Martial held upon the most prominent mutineers of the 66th 
Regiment. Upon the sentences passed, he will here make 
no comment, as they have been approved of and carried 
into effect by the Major General commanding on the spot.* 

The Commander in Chief has pleasure in expressing his 
approbation of the conduct of Lieutenant Colonel Bradford, 
1st Light Cavalry, which appears to have been decided and 
judicious. 

Sir Charles Napier has equal satisfaction in expressing 
his approbation of the prompt, decided and resolute con- 
duct of Captain Macdonald, the Fort Adjutant ; which 
conduct the Commander in Chief believes prevented the 
Fort of Govindgurh from falling into the hands of the 
mutineers. 

It is now the Commander in Chief's painful duty to 
remark upon the disobedience of orders committed by 
Major H. Troup, commanding the 66th Native Infantry. 



* Major General Sir W. R. Gilbert, commanding the Punjaub Division, 
was deputed by His Excellency to supervise the proceedings of the Court 
Martial which tried the mutinous Sepoys of the 66th N. L 



103 



When the Regiment mutinied, the conduct of this Officer 
was cool, resolute and deserving of the highest praise ; but 
Major Troup had not previously read and explained to the 
Sepoys of his Regiment, the Governor General's order, dated 
25th October 1849, when he received those orders at 
Lucknow in November. 

Those orders were issued by the Governor General, 
through the Commander in Chief, for the express purpose 
of preparing the minds of the Sepoys for the just and 
necessary cessation of a temporary allowance, generously 
granted to the troops during the war. 

To cause those Sepoys to discuss, to consider, and 
thoroughly to understand that reduction was the object of 
issuing those orders ; and they must, from the sound prin- 
ciple on which they were based, have brought a conviction 
of their justness to the minds of the Sepoys. 

Had Major Troup himself, or through his Interpreter, 
read and carefully explained the Governor General's orders 
to his Regiment, as all Commanding Officers were specially 
ordered to do, the mutiny might possibly still have taken 
place, but Major Troup would have done his duty, instead 
of assuming to himself as he did the right to disobey his 
orders, orders which were distinct, positive, and left no 
latitude to Major Troup's discretion. 

The Commander in Chief regrets to recal to the attention 
of Major Troup, that, in His Excellency's orders of the 
25th October, he said that he would hold Commanding 
Officers severely responsible for the explanation of those 
orders being made to the Sepoys ;* and he therefore thus 



* In a Notification from the Adjutant General's Office publishing the 
Government Orders for the discontinuance of " Scinde Pay" and granting 
furlough in double proportion to the Native Regiments leaving the 



104 



publicly expresses his unqualified dissatisfaction that Major 
Troup should have considered his Sergeant Major to be the 
proper instrument for communicating the orders of the 
Governor General and of the Commander in Chief to the 
Sepoys of his Regiment ! The Government of India has 
appointed an Interpreter to every Regiment, for the purpose 
of translating orders to the Native Corps, yet Major Troup 
left to a Sergeant Major to explain, not to the men, but to 
the Orderly Havildars to explain to the Sepoys, one of the 
most important and critical orders that ever was issued by 
a Governor General, and which the Commander in Chief 
had specially directed to be carefully explained by Com- 
manding Officers to their Regiments ! 

Truly this shows a laxity of discipline that is enough to 
destroy the best army in the world ! 

With regard to Lieutenant Barker, the Commander in 
Chief is dissatisfied with the report made of that Officer's 
conduct, and Major General Sir Walter Gilbert will be 
pleased to place Lieutenant Barker in arrest, and order a 
Court of Inquiry to investigate and pronounce an opinion 
whether that Officer did his utmost to quell the mutiny of 
his guard ; for it appears to the Commander in Chief, that 
Lieutenant Barker did not do his duty on that occasion, 
and that, had it not been for the energetic conduct of Cap- 
tain Macdonald, the gates would have remained in posses- 
sion of the mutineers, and the entrance of the 1st Light 
Cavalry have been prevented. 

Finally, the Commander in Chief will take this oppor- 
tunity of expressing his fervent hope, that the young- 
European Officers of this army, who are full of ability, 

Punjaub, the last paragraph says that " the Commander in Chief will hold 
Commanding Officers severely responsible that these orders are fully and 
clearly explained and made known to all whom they concern." 



105 



zeal, and of good feeling towards the Natives, will see the 
necessity of endeavouring to associate as much as possible 
with the Native Officers, and make them their comrades 
in every sense of the word. It is thus alone that the 
European Officer can expect to acquire a thorough know- 
ledge of what passes in his Regiment, and of the feelings 
which exist among those under his command. It is not 
through Sergeant Majors and Orderly Havildars that the 
Sepoy is to learn the justice, the generosity, and the care 
for his welfare which is exercised by his Government ; these 
things he must learn direct from his European Officers. 
The abolition of Scinde allowance in the Punjaub ought 
to have been the subject of explanation and discourse of 
every European Officer in the Regiment with the men of 
his company. 

In future every order issued by the Commander in Chief 
is to be read by Commanding Officers personally, or 
through their Interpreter, to the Regiment under their res- 
pective command • and again read and explained by every 
European Officer on his private parade to the company 
which he commands. 

All Officers commanding Regiments in the Punjaub are, 
upon the receipt of this order, to report to the Adjutant 
General of the Army, stating the day on which they 
received the orders of the Governor General and Command- 
er in Chief of the 25th of October last ; also on what day 
and by whom they were read and explained to the Sepoys 
of the Regiment under their command. 

Major O'Brien is immediately to march the Nusseree 
Battalion to Govindgurh, leaving its present arms, colours, 
accoutrements and stores at Juttogh, and on arriving at 
Govindgurh, he will make over his Native commissioned, 
non-commissioned Officers and Privates to Major Troup, 

P 



106 



commanding the 66th or Goorka Regiment, who is imme- 
diately to issue the arms, accoutrements and colors of the 66th 
Regiment under his command, to the Goorkas. The 66th 
or Goorka Regiment thus newly formed and constituted, is 
to receive the line rates of pay and batta, from the date of 
receipt of this order at Juttogh. Major O'Brien will be so 
good as to take his measures for immediately recruiting the 
Nusseree Battalion to its full strength, in place of the men 
made over to the 66th Regiment.* 



Lieutenant A. Barker, 66th iV. /. 
The Court of Inquiry assembled at Govindgurh, in 
conformity with the General Order of the 27th of February 
last, for the purpose of investigating into the conduct 
of Lieutenant A. Barker, of the 66th Regiment of Native 
Infantry, having closed its proceedings, is dissolved, and 



* With reference to these and certain previous orders, His Excellency 
issued the following " Memorandum" on the 26th March: — 

Memorandum. — The Commander in Chief having caused copies of the 
General Orders of the 31st January last and 27th ultimo, (the former 
publishing the result of a Court Martial on certain Sepoys of the 32nd, 
the latter dismissing the Native Officers, non-commissioned Officers and 
Sepoys of the 66th Regiment of Native Infantry from the service of Govern- 
ment, and constituting the Nusseree Battalion the 66th or Goorka Regi- 
ment,) to be struck off at the Delhi Press, in the Deva Nagree character, 
in sufficient number to admit of three copies being forwarded to every 
Native corps of the line in the service, Artillery, Cavalry and Infantry. His 
Excellency is pleased to direct that on receiving them, the Commanding 
Officers of such corps will cause a copy of the translations to be entered 
in the book kept for the purpose in every troop and company, and have 
them frequently read and fully explained to the men both on company 
and regimental parades. 

One copy of each of the translations is also to be hung up in the quar- 
ter guards of corps. 



107 



His Excellency the Commander in Chief is pleased to 
express his approval of the opinion recorded by the 
Court. 

Lieutenant Barker is to be released from arrest, and 
permitted to return to his duty, under instructions which 
will be communicated to Major General Sir W. R. Gilbert, 
G. C. B., Commanding the Punjaub Division. — Head 
Quarters, Camp, Sohul, 1st April 1850. 



Gunner Thomas Green, 4th Company 5th Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 6th 
February 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Habitual drunkenness; 2nd, Arming him- 
self with a musket to offer violence to Sergeant G. Mactier ; 
3rd, Offering violence to Corporal E. Kenney, by throwing 
at him the musket referred to in the 2nd charge. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year with solitary con- 
finement for fourteen days in the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th 
and 12th months. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quar- 
ters, Camp, 23rd February 1850. 



Jemadar Bhowanee Lalla, 22nd N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Ferozepore, 26th 
February 1850. 

Charge. — Conduct disgraceful to a commissioned Officer 
in grossly prevaricating in evidence given on the trial of 
Subadar Sewdeen Awustee, for the purpose of screening 
the accused from the charge on which he was arraigned. 

Finding. — Guilty. 



108 



Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, 2nd March 1850. 

Captain William Charles Hollings, 47th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 11th 
Tanuary 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having at Cawnpore, on the 6th of 
November 1849, when Superintending Officer of a Native 
Court of Requests, attended the Court in a state of intoxi- 
cation, which rendered him incapable of properly conduct- 
ing the proceedings. 

2nd. For highly unbecoming conduct, in having, at 
Cawnpore, on the same occasion, addressed abusive lan- 
guage to, and struck Dheraj, Mahajun, a party to suits 
before the Court, and in having addressed himself in fami- 
liar and obscene language to persons present in Court. 

3rd. For having, at Cawnpore, on the 17th November 
1849, been drunk at an inspection parade of the Regiment. 

Finding. — 1st charge, Guilty; 2nd, Not Guilty ; 3rd, the 
Court find the prisoner Guilty of having, at Cawnpore, on 
the 17th November 1849, been partially intoxicated at an 
inspection parade of the Regiment, but not " drunk," of 
which the Court acquit him, and with regard to this 
charge, the Court being of opinion, that the matter was 
disposed of at the time by what has hitherto been consi- 
dered competent authority, abstain from passing any sen- 
tence against the prisoner on it. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for six months. 

Revised. — The Court is directed to read over 
the first charge on which it has convicted the pri- 
soner, and then to read the 7 6th Article of War ; 



109 



it will see that it has no power to pass any other 
sentence than that of " cashiering" which it must 
therefore do, or stand a prosecution for passing an 
illegal sentence. 

With regard to the second charge, the finding of 
the Court is in the face of the evidence, and I have 
directed the Judge Advocate General to point this 
out to the Court. With regard to the third charge, 
the Court has erroneously assumed that the crime 
was disposed of previously by competent authority. 
The Judge Advocate General will also explain this 
error to the Court, and that a refusal to pass sen- 
tence upon a criminal will expose the President 
and Members of the Court to the charge of disobe- 
dience of orders in refusing to do its duty ; I there- 
fore recommend the Court to read the 42nd Arti- 
cle of War. — Head Quarters, Camp Peshawur, 7 th 
February 1850. 

Revised Finding. — Guilty on all three charges. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation. — As it appears from the remarks of 
His Excellency the Commander in Chief, that there is no 
discretionary power as to the punishment in this case, the 
Court unanimously and respectfully beg leave to recom- 
mend the prisoner to the merciful consideration of the 
Commander in Chief, on the grounds of the weak state of 
health he was in when he committed the offences, his long 
service, and high character. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — It is a matter of surprise to me that the 



110 



Court should recommend the prisoner to pardon! 
I must refer the Court to the charges against the 
prisoner, of which the Court have found him guilty, 
and I ask if a person guilty of such conduct can 
be described as an Officer of " high character" 
and pardoned upon such grounds? Certainly not, 
and I should do a gross injustice to the Company's 
service were I to pardon the prisoner. — Head 
Quarters, Camp, 2nd March 1850. 



Lieutenant Robert Renny, 47th iV. /. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 11th 
February 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For direct and wilful disobedience of 
orders, dated 21st December 1820 and 30th December 
1823, in being at the present time under pecuniary obliga- 
tion for money borrowed from a Native Officer; he, 
Lieutenant Renny, having, at Benares, on or about the 
15th of December 1843, borrowed of (the late) Mudaree 
Roy, Subadar of the 47th Regiment Native Infantry, the 
sum of five hundred Rupees, which sum at the present 
time remains unpaid. 

2nd. For great disrespect to His Excellency the Com- 
mander in Chief, in having, at Cawnpore, between die 
6th and 22nd of June 1849, repeated to several persons at 
the station, certain observations on the proceedings of a 
Court Martial which had been recently held at Cawnpore, 
which he stated to have been made to him by the Com- 
mander in Chief in person, and having represented those 
observations as a good joke, or in disrespectful terms to 
that effect. 



Ill 



Finding. — 1st charge, Not Guilty; 2nd charge, Guilty, 
with the exception of the words " great disrespect to His 
Excellency the Commander in Chief." 

Sentence. — To be reprimanded in such manner as His 
Excellency the Commander in Chief may be pleased to 
direct. — Approved and confirmed, — 

Except that I cannot agree with the Court in 
thinking, that this gallant Officer has done any 
thing to demand a reprimand, and therefore I must 
decline giving him the slightest reprimand. On 
the contrary his trial has given me a very high 
opinion of him as an Officer. — Head Quarters, 
Camp, 2nd March 1850. 

Private Joseph Mortimer, H. M. 3rrf Light Dragoons. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 1st Fe- 
bruary 1850. 

Charge. — Disgraceful conduct in the theft of property 
or the concealment thereof, knowing it to be stolen. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes and six months' imprisonment. — 
Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, \Qth 
February 1850. 

v * Captain Christopher Hasell, 48tfA N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Secrole, Benares 
14th February 1850. 

Charge. — For gross disobedience of orders, and disres- 
pect to Major General J. Kennedy, C. B., unbecoming an 
Officer, and highly injurious to Military discipline, in the 
following instances : 



112 



1st. In having, at Benares, on the 12th of November 
1849, being directed in Station Orders of the previous day 
to inspect and report on the state of the lines just vacated 
by the right wing of the Regiment, made a report different 
from that prescribed ; and in having pertinaciously and 
litigiously refused to make the customary report on the 
lines, though repeatedly required to do so by Major Gene- 
ral J. Kennedy, C. B., commanding the Benares Division, 
in letters from the Assistant Adjutant General, dated 13th, 
20th and 21st of November 1849. 

2nd. In having taken no notice of the Major General's 
order, conveyed to him, in the Assistant Adjutant General's 
letter, No. 361, dated 13th November 1849, to make the 
prescribed report, until reminded of it in a second letter, 
No. 371, dated 20th of the same month; and in having, in 
a letter to the Assistant Adjutant General, dated Benares, 
22nd November 1849, expressed himself, respecting the 
required report, in terms very disrespectful to Major 
General J. Kennedy, C. B. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for four months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Court must have felt it painful to 
punish an old Officer of 16 years' service, so do I; 
but we feel it more painful to see unprovoked dis- 
respect inflicted upon a much older and most res- 
pected Officer in the execution of his duty, and to 
see orders disobeyed and discipline insulted by a 
Captain in the service! Those who fancy that 
this army is a debating society, will find them- 



113 



selves egregiously mistaken. — Ca?np, Korie, 9th 
March 1850. 

Omrao Sing, Sepoy, 5th iV. /. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 8th March 
1850. 

Charge. — Having plundered Government treasure boxes 
placed under his charge, abstracting therefrom 238 half 
rupees. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labor for 14 years. — 
Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, 13th 
March 1850. 

Leave to the Kills. 

Head Quarters, Camp, Korie, 20th March 1850. 

The number of applications from Officers for leave of 
absence obliges the Commander in Chief to make the 
following observations, beginning with the European 
Regiments : 

1st. The European Private Soldier has the same consti- 
tution as the European Officer. He suffers equally from 
the effects of heat. 

2nd. He has necessarily fewer comforts, and more dis- 
comforts than are experienced by the European Officer. 

3rd. He has never any leave on " urgent private affairs:" 
be it hot or be it cold, he passes the year in his cantonment. 

4th. On the other hand, the Officer has every comfort 
and every luxury that can diminish the discomfort of a hot 
climate ; and the Commander in Chief cannot help think- 
ing, that the known pride which British Officers take in 
sharing all dangers and deprivations with their Soldiers 
will induce the former to consider, that leaving their bro- 

Q 



114 



ther Officers and their men to encounter the heat of summer 
while they are diverting themselves on " urgent private 
affairs" in the hills, is very like deserting their post from 
fear of climate. 

The Commander in Chief himself does not go to Simla 
for pleasure, nor to avoid heat. He goes much against his 
will, because all the Head Quarters' establishments are 
located at Simla, and to move them is not practicable. 
Moreover the Commander in Chief can best serve the 
army by being near the Governor General. If Sir Charles 
Napier followed his own wishes, he would establish his 
Head Quarters at some one of the large stations, where he 
would be among the troops. 

The Commander in Chief does not wish to prevent 
Officers having short leave for a month or two, which is 
quite long enough to settle any " urgent private affairs," 
that an Officer can have in India ; neither does the Com- 
mander in Chief wish to prevent Officers having leave who 
are really ill, and whose medical men conscientiously 
believe that change of air is necessary. But he cannot 
allow the fear of climate, the love of pleasure, or the desire 
to escape from Regimental duty, to throw it on their hard 
working comrades ; nor is it very encouraging to the Pri- 
vate Soldier to see his Officers scampering off to the hills 
the moment the heat begins. No one likes extreme heat, 
and therefore no one ought to shirk from it at the expense 
of others. 

Holding these opinions the Commander in Chief must 
call on Commanding Officers to confine applications for 
leave to those who are delicate in health, and whom they 
know to require change of air. Let the rest share, with 
their men, the dangers and discomforts of the hot weather. 
Discipline will be thus sustained. 



115 



As to the Officers of the Native Regiments the case is 
different. Their presence is not required to cheer and 
give heart to their men. The Sepoy is at home, the heat 
is congenial to him, and he gets leave frequently. He has 
every indulgence that can be given to a Soldier. There is, 
therefore, no objection, on that score, to a Company's 
Officer having leave. But there are objections on other 
points. The European Officers are few in a Native Corps, 
and they cannot be spared from Regimental duty. The 
state of discipline is such as to demand every exertion in 
every Officer to bring it to that perfection which it ought 
to attain. It is idle to suppose that a Regiment is not to be 
kept in order during the hot weather. There cannot be as 
much drill as there is in cold weather ; but there may be 
quite enough to keep a Regiment in the highest order ; over 
doses at drill are not good at any time. It is a constant 
drill applied in some portions, and the constant instruction 
of Officers by their Commander that keep a Regiment in 
good order. Parades and drills, however short and slight, 
may go on before sunrise and after sunset. A single 
manoeuvre performed daily, and with scrupulous exactness, 
will keep a Regiment in good order. 

There is always plenty for old Officers to do, and for the 
young Officers to learn, at the Head Quarters of every Regi- 
ment, during the hottest weather ; and this the Commander 
in Chief expects to be done by those who are in 
health. 

His Excellency believes the mass of Officers to have a 
sincere zeal for the public service and great pride in their 
profession. All that the Indian army requires is that the 
senior Officers should instruct the junior. 

In proportion as the number of Officers is limited, so 
must exertion increase. 



116 



These are always to be pre- 
sent and fit for duty at 
Head Quarters. 



Sir Charles Napier will therefore not allow the propor- 
tion of leave, granted by his predecessors to Officers in 
Queen's Regiments to be increased ; this has been for the 
last 15 years as follows, reserving, 
Cavalry. 
2 Field Officers, .... 

4 Captains, 

14 Subalterns, 

Infantry. 

2 Field Officers, 

5 Captains, 

16 Subalterns, 

" Commanding Officers must satisfy themselves, in com- 

" munication with the senior Medical Officer of the Regi- 
" ment, that there is no probability of any subsequent ap- 
" plication being made for others on Medical Certificate, 
" that His Lordship may not be forced into the necessity 
" of cancelling the leave previously granted to others on 
" private affairs." 

Such was the order of Lord William Bentinck, and Offi- 
cers Commanding Regiments are answerable, that this full 
allowance of Officers shall be always at their Head 
Quarters. 



Expedition against the Affredies.— Thanks from 
Government. 

Head Quarters, Camp, Bamineewallah, 21st 
March 1850. 
His Excellency the Commander in Chief has 
much pleasure in communicating to Brigadier Sir 
Colin Campbell, K. C. B., and the Officers and men 



117 



engaged in the operations against the Affredies 
in the neighbourhood, of Kohat, that he has been 
instructed by the Most Noble the Governor Gene- 
ral of India in Council, to express to them the 
satisfaction of the Government, with the manner in 
which the outrage committed by these mountain 
tribes was met by the troops in the field, who so 
highly distinguished themselves throughout this 
service. And Sir Charles Napier has further been 
requested to convey to Sir Colin Campbell, the 
Commanding Officers, Officers and men the appro- 
bation of the Government of India, and their 
thanks for the service which has been performed. 

Courts Martial. 

Sergeant John Buttress, Sappers and Pioneers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Loodianah, 13th 
February 1850. 

Charge. — Disgraceful conduct in the fraudulent misap- 
plication of money. 

Finding. — Guilty, except as to certain instances. 

Sentence. — Reduction to the ranks, and stoppages to 
make good rupees 82 misapplied. — Approved and con- 
firmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, Lahore, 2nd March 1850. 

Gholam Mahomed Khan, Native Doctor, 7 th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Loodianah, 20th 
March 1850. 

Charge. — Requiring and receiving pecuniary gratifica- 
tion from certain Sepoys for obtaining leave of absence for 
them on medical certificate. 



118 



Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, Lahore, 22nd March 
1850. 



Taking- Divisional and Brigade Orders. 

Head Quarters, Camp, Lahore, 25th 
March 1850. 
The Commanding Officer of a Queen's Regiment 
has applied to the Commander in Chief to allow 
the said Commanding Officer "to pay a Native 
writer out of the Canteen Fund," to go and take 
the daily orders at the quarters of the Brigade 
Major. 

The Commander in Chief will allow of no such 
thing ; and he desires the Officer who made this 
extraordinary application to understand, that it is 
the duty of the Adjutant of the Regiment to take 
orders from the Brigade Major, and that duty is 
not to be delegated to any one, much less to a 
" Native writer." — Adjutants are responsible that 
orders are correctly taken by them from the Major 
of Brigade to the Commanding Officers of Regi- 
ments. Adjutants are always to attend personally 
for orders at the Brigade Major's quarters. — If an 
occasion arises that prevents an Adjutant from so 
attending at the Brigade Major's quarters, then it 
is the duty of the Orderly Officer to attend in place 
of the Adjutant ; and His Excellency desires that 



119 



this rule of the Service may not be broken, as 
it is the only security for the due circulation of 
orders. 

The Officer above alluded to states, that the dis- 
tance is a mile and a quarter to the Brigade 
Major's Office, and that orders are issued in the 
hottest part of the day : The answer is plain — 
Adjutants are allowed Horses ; and it is the duty 
of Generals of Divisions and Brigades to take 
care that their Assistant Adjutant Generals, and 
Majors of Brigade, have their Offices in convenient 
positions — that they issue the orders at proper 
hours — and not at mid-day during the hot weather. 

The Commander in Chief must beg that Officers 
Commanding Divisions and Brigades will strictly 
maintain these ancient rules of Armies, and not 
suffer such a relaxation of discipline to be ex- 
hibited by Staff Officers and Commanders of 
Regiments as the above mentioned application 
evinces. 

Leave on Private Affairs. 

Head Quakters, Camp, 27th March 1850. 

In continuation of the Rules regarding leave of 
absence laid down in General Orders of the 20th 
instant, His Excellency the Commander in Chief is 
pleased to direct, that except under urgent circum- 
stances, which are to be fully explained (confiden- 
tially if the applicant chooses), applications for 
leave on private affairs shall not be forwarded to 



120 



Head Quarters by the intermediate authorities, 
unless the proportion of Officers " present" is equal 
to one per troop or company, exclusive of Field 
Officers and Staff. 



Courts martial. 

Shekh Madar Buksh, Subadar, 66th JY. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Govindgurh, 14th 
February 1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Govindgurh, on or about 2nd 
February 1850, when on duty at the gate guard of the 
Fort, and being present at a mutiny of the Sepoys of the 
said guard, not used his utmost efforts to suppress the 
same. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. 

Recommendation. — The Court beg unanimously to recom- 
mend the prisoner to the mercy of His Excellency the 
Commander in Chief. Their recommendation is founded 
on the prisoner's length of service. The Court trusts he 
may not be, in his old age, entirely deprived of the bene- 
fits of a lengthened service. 

I confirm the sentence, but wholly disapprove 
of it as inadequate to the crime. I reject the 
recommendation of the Court, with this caution to 
all Native Officers, that they shall do their duty 
or lose their commissions. This criminal had just 
before beard my order read about Runjeet Sing's 
dismissal. I repeat it to this army that mutineers 
shall have no mercy from me. — Head Quarters, 
Camp, 24:th February 1850. 



121 



Gunga Singh, Jemadar, 66th N. I. 
Tried by the same Court Martial, 16th February 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Govindgurh, on or about 
2nd February 1850, when being present and aware that 
the Sepoys of his company were mutinously arming and 
accoutring themselves, failed to give information thereof 
to his Commanding Officer. 

2nd. For conduct unbecoming an Officer, in having, 
then and there falsely stated to Major H. Troup, command- 
ing his Regiment, that he, Gunga Singh, Jemadar, was not 
aware that the Sepoys of the grenadier company were 
arming and accoutring themselves without orders. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. 

The sentence is inadequate to the crime. — Head 
Quarters, Camp, 23rd February 1850. 

Revised Sentence. — Transportation for life. — Approved 
and confirmed. 

Remarks. — I revised the former proceedings, 
because I thought that the sentence was too lenient. 
The present sentence I consider to be just ; but 
I nevertheless commute it to dismissal and fourteen 
years' imprisonment, because no mutineer of the 
66th Kegiment has been punished with such se- 
verity as transportation ; and as his crime was 
less than that of the men of the gate guard, I do 
not think it would be just that his punishment 
should be greater. — Head Quarters, Camp, \Uh 
March 1850. 

R 



122 



Lieutenant Thomas Latter, 67th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Dinapore, 12th 
March 1850. 

Charge. — For highly unbecoming conduct, in having, at 
Dinapore, on the 19th of December 1849, when Regimental 
Officer of the day, and visiting the Hospital guard of the 
Regiment, struck with a cane, and grossly abused Usdully 
Khan, Sepoy, of the same Regiment, who was sentry at 
the Hospial guard. 

Finding. — Guilty, with the exception of the words " struck 
with a cane" and " grossly." 

Sentence. — To be reprimanded in such manner as the 
Commander in Chief may direct. — Approved and con- 
firmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — 1st, When an Officer so forgets the sacred 
character of a sentry as to abuse the Soldier on 
his post, that Officer must be prepared to receive 
such punishment as the protection of sentries may 
demand. 

Lieutenant Latter, without any just cause for 
such improper conduct, rode up to and abused 
Usdully Khan, Sepoy, when that Soldier was on 
sentry and pushed the Soldier's cap straight with 
a cane, which he, Lieutenant Latter, had in his 
hand ; such treatment would have warranted the 
sentry to have kept Lieutenant Latter off with his 
bayonet ! Lieutenant Latter must learn that sen- 
tries are not to be insulted. If a sentry deserves 
a reprimand, it is to be given in a proper manner 



123 



and not with a cane, nor with such language as 
Lieutenant Latter used, for which he is hereby 
reprimanded according to the sentence of the 
Court. 

2nd. Brigadier General Young will order the 
foregoing reprimand to be translated into Hincloo- 
stanee and read at the head of the 67th Kegiment 
Native Infantry, after which Lieutenant Latter is 
to return to his duty. — Head Quarters, Camp, 27 th 
March 1850. 



Bravery of Shaik Ghoolam G-ouse, a Native Doctor. 

The spirit of all armies is formed and raised by 
publishing the gallant deeds of its members. The 
following extract from Captain J. Coke's despatch, 
reporting the murder of Dr. Healy, near Kohat, 
exhibits the conduct of a young Native Doctor in 
so honorable a light that it gives the Commander 
in Chief pleasure in making it known : 

" Doctor Healy had arrived within six miles of 
this place, when, on passing through some low 
jungle within a mile of the village of Togue, a 
party of AfFredies, who were lying concealed in 
the jungle, rushed on him and cut him down, and 
made oif to the hills immediately, not waiting to 
plunder his baggage. Mr. Healy was walking at 
the time with a Native Doctor, Shaik Ghoolam 
Gouse, lately appointed to the Kegiment; two 
Sowars were also with Mr. Healy at the time. 



124 



The Native Doctor escaped, having shot the Af- 
fredie who attacked him, with his pistol, and then 
returned and carried off Mr. Healy to the village 
of Togue. This boy's conduct, a lad of 18 or 19, 
is deserving of much praise ; he is the son of a 
Native Doctor, who with his brother were for 
many years Native Doctors in the 10th Regiment 
Native Infantry, and died with the Corps at Bar- 
rackpore." — Head Quarters, Camp, 2nd April 
1850. 

Courts Martial. 

Private John Creane, H. M. \&th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Meerut, 3rd May 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Stabbing Private John Roache, with a 
bayonet, with intent to murder him ; 2nd, Stabbing, as in 
1st charge, with intent to do some grievous bodily harm. 

Finding. — 1st Charge, Not Guilty; 2nd Charge, Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for fifteen years. — Approved 
and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I am surprised that the Court permitted 
the Deputy Judge Advocate to hold such dictato- 
rial language as he did. In addressing the Court 
as prosecutor, he says, " I have to add, that if the 
" Court convict the prisoner under the 1st charge, 
" they should acquit him under the 2nd charge, 
" and vice versa." This is the language of a 
learned Judge from the Bench instructing an igno- 



125 



rant jury, and not that which becomes a young 
Officer to a Court Martial, composed of Officers, the 
youngest Captain on which is ten years his senior 
in the service, and, probably, his superior in know- 
ledge of military law, of which Captain and Brevet 
Major Wiggens has, in this trial, shewn himself to 
be very ignorant. 

2nd. — In drawing up the proceedings of this trial, 
the President should not have allowed the Deputy 
Judge Advocate to have inserted " conducting the 
trial Major E. Wiggens, Officiating Deputy Judge 
Advocate General." The Deputy Judge Advocate 
General does not conduct a trial. The Articles of 
"War expressly charge the President of the Court 
with all the duties and details of conducting the 
trial ; he is to make the Members take their seats 
according to their rank ; he clears and re-opens the 
Court when necessary ; he preserves order ; he col- 
lects the votes ; no questions are put but through him 
and by his permission, or by that of the Court. — 
The Judge Advocate cannot interfere with any 
thing of his own authority in the proceedings of a 
Court Martial, for which the President and the 
Members are alone responsible. — Head Quarters, 
mh May 1850. 



Captain Hugh John Houstoun, 2nd European Regiment. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Agra, 27th March 
1850. 



12G 



Charge. — Unbecoming conduct. 1st, In having on 
groundless and frivolous pretences, evaded payment of a 
just debt due to the Mess, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers; 
2nd, In having in certain correspondence, made use of very 
indecorous language, disrespectful to Major Ripley and 
Lieutenant Colonel Birrell. 

Finding. — 1st instance, Guilty; 2nd instance, Guilty, 
except as to Lieutenant Birrell. 

Sentence. — Loss of one step. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, Camp, \2th April 1850. 



Private Michael Sweeney, H. M. 70th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Fort William, 15th 
April 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Being drunk in Barracks at tattoo; 2nd, 
Having struck a Lance Sergeant, and used violent and 
mutinous language. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year, with solitary con- 
finement for the last fourteen days of the 4th, 8th and 12th 
months. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 30th 
April 1850. 

Private Aaron Fallows, H. 31. 10th Foot. 
Tried by Court Martial the same day. 
Charge. — Using threatening language regarding two 
Sergeants of the Regiment. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years. — Confirmed. 
Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I do not revise the proceedings because of 
the delay in the execution of justice which a revi- 



127 



sion would occasion, but I think the sentence too 
severe for what (like all such idle threats,) I call a 
mere ebullition of ill temper, but still deserving 
of punishment ; I therefore remit a year and a 
half of the sentence. — Head Quarters, 30th April 
1850. 



Barrack Accommodation. 

The following Orders are issued for the guidance of 
General Officers commanding Divisions and Officers com- 
manding Regiments, Troops and Companies, who will be 
held responsible for a strict obedience to the same. 

1. The practice of allowing married families to occupy 
verandahs, while single men occupy the centre rooms, is 
prohibited. 

2. Where there are no separate barracks or other 
buildings for the accommodation of married men, one 
barrack, or a portion of a barrack, estimated as below, 
should be partitioned off for them. 

3. It is not the amount of space in square, but in cubic 
feet, that should form the basis of all calculations for the 
number of people to be accommodated in barracks. This 
allowance should be, at the lowest calculation, 1,000 cubic 
feet of air for every man, woman and child ; and is to be 
calculated from the length, breadth and height of each 
barrack room, exclusive of verandahs. No allowance is to 
be made for men absent on guard, or in hospital, or on 
detachment; but the calculation is to be made on the full 
effective strength. 

4. If the barracks do not admit of the above quantity 
of air for each individual, application should be made to 



128 



Government, through the Commander in Chief, for addi- 
tional barracks. — Head Quarters, Simla, 6th May 1850. 

Resignation of Lieutenant Colonel P. Grant, 
Adjutant General. 

In publishing the resignation of Lieutenant Colonel 
Grant, Sir C. Napier has great pleasure in expressing his 
high opinion of that Officer's abilities, and in acknowledg- 
ing the assistance, which, as Commander in Chief, he has 
received from the Adjutant General, during the short period 
that he, Sir Charles, has had the honor to command the 
Armies of India. It is due to Lieutenant Colonel Grant, 
that when resigning the high appointment, of which he 
so honorably discharged the duties, he should receive this 
public acknowledgment of distinguished services ; — services 
that could have been much better described by that Noble- 
man, the late Commander in Chief, under whose orders 
Lieutenant Colonel Grant so long and so gallantly fought, 
in whose glories he bore so conspicuous a part, and whose 
full confidence he is well known to have possessed ! — Head 
Quarters, Simla, 7th May 1850. 

Courts Martial. 

Captain C. G. Fagan, 8th Light Cavalry, Deputy Pay 

Master, Benares Circle. 
Tried by General Court Martial, at Secrole, Benares, 
22nd March 1850. 

Charges. — For conduct highly unbecoming an Officer 
and a Gentleman, in having in a letter to Assistant Surgeon 
Edward Edlin, M. D., dated Benares, February 23rd 1849, 
and calculated to deceive and injure Assistant Surgeon 
Edward Edlin, falsely represented to him the state of the 
affairs of the Benares Bank, he, Captain Fagan, being at 



129 



the time intimately connected with the direction of the 
Bank, and well acquainted with its affairs, and having 
purchased for Assistant Surgeon Edlin a large number of 
shares in the Bank, and held his proxy as a shareholder ; 
Captain Fagan having in the said letter falsely declared his 
perfect satisfaction in the then existing securities for the 
Bank's well doing, his readiness to vouch for the truth of 
all the contents of a report then recently issued by the 
Directors of the Bank, and falsely stated his " high opinion" 
of their Secretary ; whereas he, Captain Fagan, knew that 
the Bank was very far from doing well ; had cancelled 
recently about four-fifths of his own stake and responsi- 
bility in the Bank on terms unjust to the shareholders at 
large; and had, a few days previous to the date of his 
letter to Assistant Surgeon Edlin, written to the Directors 
of the Bank to the effect that he saw it was their intention to 
embark in objectionable business, and the said report of the 
Directors did not correctly describe the state of the capital of 
the Bank ; and he, Captain Fagan, did, shortly after writing 
his letter to Assistant Surgeon Edlin, concur in the dismissal 
of the Bank's Secretary for alleged incompetency. 

Additional charge. — For conduct highly unbecoming the 
character of an Officer and a Gentleman, in the following 
instances : 

1st. In having, at Benares, between the 16th of 
February 1848 and the 21st of February 1849, he being 
at the time a Director of the Benares Bank, in concert 
with other Directors of that institution, put forth one or 
more false reports of the state of the Bank, and thereby 
deceived the shareholders. 

2nd. In having, at Benares, during the month of August 
1 848, assumed an improper influence in the management 
of the affairs of the Benares Bank, by having voted as the 

S 



130 



holder of about 112 shares, notwithstanding that he had 
not paid for the same, and well knew that he had no right 
to vote upon them. 

3rd. In having, at Benares, during the month of 
December 1848, cancelled at their par value about 133 
shares in the Benares Bank, held by himself, notwithstand- 
ing that the market value of the said shares was at the 
rate of about 25 to 30 per cent, discount, thereby causing 
injury to the shareholders at large and gaining himself an 
unfair advantage. 

Finding. — The Court having maturely weighed and 
considered the evidence brought forward in support of the 
prosecution, together with that adduced on the defence, is 
of opinion, that the prisoner Captain Christopher George 
Fagan, of the 8th Regiment of Light Cavalry, and Deputy 
Pay Master, Benares Circle, is guilty of the first charge, 
with the exception of the words "injure," "and falsely, 
stated his high opinion of their Secretary," " and res- 
ponsibility in the Bank on terms unjust to the shareholders 
at large," " he saw it was their intention to embark in 
objectionable business," "and he, Captain Fagan, did, 
shortly after writing his letter to Assistant Surgeon Edlin, 
concur in the dismissal of the Bank's Secretary for alleged 
incompetency," of which the Court acquit him. 

Guilty of the first instance of the additional charge. 

Guilty of the second instance of the additional charge. 

Not guilty of the third instance of the additional charge, 
of which the Court acquit him. 

Guilty of the preamble of the additional charge. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation. — The Court having awarded a sentence 
which they deem adequate to the offences of which they 
have found the prisoner guilty, do now most earnestly re- 



131 



commend him to the clemency of His Excellency the Com- 
mander in Chief, on the grounds of the very high charac- 
ter he, Captain Fagan, has borne during his service of 22 
years. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Court have convicted the prisoner of 
falsehood and deceit in his dealings with a brother 
Officer, who seems to have confided in him, yet 
eleven members of the Court recommend the prison- 
er to mercy " on the grounds of high character ;" 
such recommendations add much to the pain of 
those whose duty it is to inflict punishment, but I 
must decline complying with the request of those 
members who concur in this recommendation. 
When violence of temper, error in judgment, or 
the thoughtlessness of youth, lead men into culpa- 
ble conduct, their high character bears great and 
honourable weight, excusing human frailty. High 
character is also justly appealed to when concurring 
circumstances cast suspicion on yet unblemished re- 
putation ; but when the charge is dishonour, and 
that dishonour proved, former high character 
vanishes and is nothing ! — Head Quarters, Qth 
May 1850. 

Surgeon Donald Butter, M. D. 

Tried by the same Court Martial 12th April 1850. 

Charge. — For conduct highly unbecoming the charac- 
ter of an Officer and a Gentleman in the following 
instances : 



132 



1st. In having, at Benares, between the 15th February 
1848, and the 21st February 1849, he being at the time a 
Director of the Benares Bank, in concert with other Direc- 
tors of that institution, put forth one or more false reports 
of the state of the Bank, and thereby deceived the share- 
holders. 

2nd. In having, at Benares, during the month of 
August 1848, assumed an improper influence in the manage- 
ment of the affairs of the Benares Bank, by having voted 
as the holder of about 700 shares, notwithstanding that he 
had not paid for the same, and well knew that he had no 
right to vote upon them. 

3rd. In having, at Benares, during the month of De- 
cember 1848, cancelled at their par value about 344 shares 
in the Benares Bank, held by himself, notwithstanding 
that the market value of the said shares was at the rate of 
about 25 to 30 per cent, discount, thereby causing injury 
to the shareholders at large, and gaining himself an unfair 
advantage. 

Finding. — Guilty, with the exception of the words in 3rd 
instance " during the month of December 1848," the Court 
finding that the shares were cancelled on 15th January 
1849 with effect from 1st August 1848. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation. — The Court having performed their 
painful duty in awarding a punishment they deem ade- 
quate to the offences of which they have found the 
prisoner guilty, do now earnestly recommend him to the 
clemency of His Excellency the Commander in Chief, on 
the grounds of long service and previous high character. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — With regard to the recommendation to 



133 



clemency, I must refer the Court to my remarks 
on Captain Fagan's Court Martial. — Head Quar- 
ters, 6th May 1850. 

Private James Young, H. M. 80th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Dinapore, 22nd April 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Absence without leave; 2nd, Stealing 
from a pay sergeant the sum of Rupees 550. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes; two years imprisonment; for- 
feiture of all claim to pension, &c. and the Court recommends 
dismissal with ignominy. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, 4th May 1850. 

Gunner Charles Field, 1st Company, 3rd Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Dum- Dum, 4th 
April 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Being drunk on sentry duty; 2nd, Having 
at the same time left his post before being regularly 
relieved. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for twelve months. — Approved 
and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The crime of the prisoner is very great, 
but as he is a very young Soldier and that there 
are no previous convictions recorded against him, 
and moreover that, owing to the great scarcity of 
Artillery Officers, there was not one available to 



134 



speak to the prisoner's general character, I will 
suppose it to be good, and remit half the punish- 
ment to which he has been sentenced, in the hope 
that my leniency may make him a better Soldier 
in future. — Head Quarters, 5th April 1850. 

Returns and Reports from Medical Officers. 

Head Quarters, Simla, 9th May 1850. 

The attention of the Commander in Chief has been 
drawn to the extreme remissness exhibited by certain Me- 
dical Officers whose duty it is to prepare Returns and 
other documents, including the names of Native Doctors 
forming a portion of the Medical Establishment of this 
Army. The disregard of the reiterated instructions pub- 
lished on the subject is highly reprehensible, and is the 
cause of great inconvenience and unnecessary labour in the 
departments both of the Adjutant General of the Army and 
of the Military Auditor General. 

His Excellency desires to express his displeasure at the 
culpable negligence of the parties concerned, and to warn 
them that, in future, all documents of the nature referred 
to, received in the Adjutant General's Department, in 
which the errors adverted to may be detected, will be 
returned to the sender " bearing postage ;" and those re- 
ceived in the Audit Department will be returned in a simi- 
lar manner, any disbursements that may have been made 
on such documents being immediately retrenched from the 
drawer. 

The principal errors, that have attracted attention, are : 
1. Not adhering strictly to the appellation under which 
the Native Doctors are admitted into the service ; abbre- 
viating the designation, or altering the orthography. 



135 



2. Omission, or incorrect entry, of the dates of admis- 
sion into the service. 

3. Omitting to note opposite the names of parties, " N. 
M. C." or " M. C." indicative of their having been educat- 
ed in the late Native Medical Institution, or in the Medi- 
cal College. 

4. In claiming additional pay for length of service, &c. 
for parties not educated at either of the above institutions, 
and omitting to quote the authority under which it has 
been granted. 

5. Omission of dates and places of muster. 

6. Omitting to enter casualties under the head of " non- 
effective since last muster," &c. &c. &c. 



Gunners John Hynes, James Weeks, and James Fardy, 
3rd Company, 2nd Battalion Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 22nd March 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st. Stealing valuable property belonging to 
the British Government from the Tosha Khanah or State 
Wardrobe and Jewel-house at Lahore; 2nd. Setting fire to 
the Tosha Khanah. 

Finding. — Guilty, except that Gunner James Fardy is 
acquitted on the charge of setting fire to the Tosha 
Khanah. 

Sentence. — Gunners John Hynes and James Weeks, 
transportation for seven years; Gunner James Fardy im- 
prisonment in the Fort of Agra, for 18 months, with solitary 
confinement for the first fourteen days of the 5th, 7th, 
10th, 13th, 16th and 18th months. — Approved and con- 
firmed. — Head Quarters, 6 th May 1850. 



136 



Gunner Patrick Power, 1st Company, 5th Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 4th April 1849. 

Charge. — Having in his possession a powder flask, the 
property of the British Government, well knowing it to 
have been stolen. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, 8th May 1850. 



Corporal John Hogan, 3rd Company, 2nd Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 10th April 1850. 

Charge. — Receiving and possessing three stolen gown 
pieces, the property of the British Government. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, 8th May 1850. 



Gunner Patrick Gaffnay, 1st Troop, 3rd Brigade Horse 
Artillery. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 13th April 1850. 

Charge. — Receiving and possessing three gold scent 
bottles, the property of the British Government, well 
knowing them to have been feloniously stolen. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Although I have approved and confirmed 
the finding and acquittal of the prisoner on the 
evidence before the Court, I have very great doubts 
of his innocence. — Head Quarters, 8th May 1850. 



137 



Private Thomas Banks, H. M. 75th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 26th 
March 1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Umballah, on the 31st of 
January 1850, killed and murdered Sookah Ram Sepoy, 
15th Regiment of Native Infantry, by discharging at him 
a musket loaded with gunpowder and ball, and thereby 
inflicting a mortal wound on the left side of the abdomen 
of the said Sookah Ram, whereof he died on the same day. 

Finding. — Guilty with the exception of the words " and 
murdered." 

Sentence. — The Court having found the prisoner guilty 
to the extent above recorded, abstain from awarding any 
sentence, under Section LVIII. of 9 George IV., Cap. 74. 

Revised. — I cannot understand how a man can 
be acquitted of murder, who quits his barracks at 
night without leave, and against all orders, takes 
with him his musket loaded, and his bayonet fixed, 
and while thus breaking through all discipline 
shoots a Sentry dead, who was on his post and 
doing his duty. I must hope that the Court will 
consider the necessity of protecting Sentries from 
being murdered on their posts : if the Court 
adheres to its finding, I really much fear it will 
have the natural effect of making Sepoy Sentries 
very summary in their proceedings, if an armed 
European Soldier approaches their posts at night ! 

2nd. But whether the Court may deem it pro- 
per to alter its finding or confirm it, I must insist 
upon its pronouncing a sentence, whatever that 

T 



138 



sentence may be, and not excuse itself from doing- 
its duty by quoting ancient Acts of ancient Kings, 
with which neither the Court nor the Commander 
in Chief have any concern whatever. The Presi- 
dent and Members are to act under their Oath. 
They swear to do justice according- to the Rules 
and Articles for the Government of Her Majesty's 
forces, and if any doubt shall arise which is not 
explained by the said Act and Articles of War, 
then according to their consciences, the best of 
their understanding, and the custom of War in 
like cases. There is nothing in this oath which 
refers the Members to be guided by Law books or 
Laws enacted by former Sovereigns, but the re- 
verse. The Court has the Mutiny Act and Arti- 
cles of War given to it by Her Majesty, and I call 
upon the President and Members to pass a sentence 
upon the prisoner according to their oath and the 
Articles of War, or refuse to do so at their peril. 
The Court has nothing to do with any other Act 
of Parliament. — Head Quarters, Camp, 7 th April 
1850. 

Revised Finding. — The Court, having carefully read and 
taken into consideration the remarks of His Excellency the 
Commander in Chief, are of opinion, that the prisoner 
Private Thomas Banks, No. 2820, of Her Majesty's 75th 
Regiment, did kill Sookah Ram, Sepoy, at the time and 
place stated in the charge, but that he did not murder him, 
and they acquit the prisoner accordingly ; and that, as the 
prisoner is not charged with having "feloniously" killed 



Sookah Ram, Sepoy, the Court consider themselves pre- 
cluded from awarding any punishment for the following 
reasons : — 

The Court respectfully submit for the consideration of 
His Excellency the Commander in Chief, that under the 
131st Article of War no doubt exists in their minds as to 
their powers, for by that Article of War they are bound to 
proceed in conformity with the Common and Statute Law 
of England in all trials for non-military offences ; that the 
Statute 9, George IV. Chapter 74 is the law applicable to 
the case of Private Banks; that the Adjutant General's 
Circular, dated the 15th June 1829, expressly called the 
attention of the Army to that Statute ; and that copies of it 
having been supplied by the Supreme Government of India 
for use at General Courts Martial, have so been in use for 
20 years. 

The Court further respectfully submit that in no part of 
the Mutiny Act for Her Majesty's forces is the crime of 
homicide provided for, and that the 131st Article of War, 
in authorizing General Courts Martial to take cognizance of 
the crime, restricts their powers to the criminal law of Eng- 
land . — Disapproved. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Court has acquitted the prisoner. 
The President and Members have, I must suppose, 
decided " according to their consciences and the 
best of their understanding." The prisoner quitted 
his barrack at an unlawful hour, in a dark 
night, taking with him his arms and ammunition ; 
he wounded one Native Sentry, and he killed 
another. 



140 



This was " an offence which, if committed in 
England, would be Felony" and it comes under 
cognizance of the 131st Article of War. 

The precise terms in which the charge should 
be couched are nowhere dictated, either in the 
Mutiny Act or in the Articles of War, or in any 
regulation whatever. It is therefore sufficient for 
a Court Martial that the accusation or charge be 
made clear and distinct to the Court, and that the 
crime be one which, " in England would be Felony" 
that is to say, malicious, wicked, malign ; but it is 
not even necessary, according to the 131st Article 
of War, that the crime should be Felony. 

Now the understanding of the Court must be 
exceedingly limited, if it required an Attorney to 
explain to it, that the killing of one Sentry and 
stabbing of another Sentry by a Soldier, who issues 
from his barrack in a dark night, contrary to 
orders, and fully armed, " would be Felony in 
England." 

If the President and Members of the Court con- 
scientiously believed the prisoner to be innocent, 
(which belief would be incredible if they had not 
themselves recorded the extraordinary fact) they 
were right to acquit the prisoner. But, unless 
they were so convinced, they have deliberately 
erred, and have broken the 131st Article of War, 
in not convicting the prisoner of murder, for that 
Article does not say that the prisoner is to be 



141 



charged with having "feloniously" committed a 
crime, but who shall be accused of any offence, 
" which, if committed in England, would be Felony" 
and it goes on to say, " or of having committed any 
offence against the person or property of any of 
our subjects" &c. This (whether felonious or not 
felonious) does away with the necessity for using 
the word felonious or other legal technicalities, in 
forming a military charge against a Soldier brought 
before a Military Court. 

I will here quote the words of a high legal func- 
tionary at Calcutta, expressed on this very case. 
" Charges affecting the life of another cannot be 
" framed with too much particularity, but it does 
" not follow, neither is it desirable, that they 
" should be framed with the precise technicality 
" of an indictment. All that is essential in a charge 
" is, that the prisoner and the Court should be dis- 
" tinctly informed of the nature of the offence, for 
" which the prisoner is to be tried. In the present 
" case" (of Private Banks) " as the altered charge 
" contains the word murder, I am of opinion, that 
" the accused can be convicted and sentenced for 
" murder, under such altered charge." To be sure 
he could, and the Court has been misled by quib- 
bles instead of being guided by the Articles of War 
and plain sense. 

I am quite at a loss to discover why the Court 
refers to the Adjutant General's Circular, dated 



142 



15th June 1829 ? That Circular was issued by 
order of the Commander in Chief to warn the Eu- 
ropean Private Soldiers, that a change had been 
made in the law of the land, and that a man who 
wounded another could, by that change, now be 
hanged, whether the wounded man lived or died. 
What then has this Circular to do with the present 
case, where a Sentry was shot dead ? What had 
the Court to do with this Circular ? Nothing what- 
ever, and a reference to it by the Court was calcu- 
lated to pervert the course of justice, by making a 
delusive use of that Circular. 

I therefore, publicly, express my disapprobation 
of this improper introduction of irrelevant matter. 
It was the special duty of Lieutenant Colonel 
Horsford, as President of the Court, to have pre- 
vented the insertion of this absurd reference in the 
proceedings, which he ex-officio conducted. 

These quibbles appear to me to be unworthy of 
Officers forming a Court of honor and of equity, 
and sworn to judge according to their consciences 
and the custom of war ; they are calculated to 
injure the discipline of the Army ; they afford pro- 
tection to crime ! 

The result of the Court's finding and sentence 
is, that the prisoner, who quitted his quarters at 
an illegal hour, in a dark night, taking with him 
his arms loaded and prepared for mischief, who 
wounded one Sentry and slew another, is to return 



143 



to the ranks an absolved man, because the unne- 
cessary word "felonious" was not inserted in the 
charge on which he was tried. Thus the integrity 
of discipline remains unvindicated. — Head Quar- 
ters, 27th April 1850. 

Goordial Sing, Sepoy, 60 N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 26th 
March 1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Somnagunge, on the 8th of 
February 1850, in front of the Regiment on parade, used vio- 
lence against his superior Officer Khoosial Khan, Subadar 
of the same Regiment, in having assaulted him with fixed 
bayonet, and wounded him on the chest, with the intention 
of murdering him. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for seven years. 

Revised. — If armed Soldiers are to step out of 
the ranks and thrust their bayonets into their 
Officers, or any one whom it may please them 
to treat in this manner, there is an end of 
discipline. I certainly think that seven years' 
transportation is a very inadequate punishment 
for this unprovoked and deliberate attempt to 
murder his Subadar. — Head Quarters, Camp, 11th 
April 1850. 

Revised Sentence. — Transportation for life. — Approved 
and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I commute the sentence to twenty-one 



144 



years' transportation, on account of the prisoner's 
former good character. — Head Quarters, Simla, 
Uth May 1850. 



Needha Sing, Jemadar, 4lst N. I. 

Charges. — 1st, Borrowing Rs. 35 from a Sepoy of the 
Regiment; 2nd, Borrowing Rs. 20 from another Sepoy of 
the Regiment. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence, — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for one month. 

Revised. — Because I think the punishment in- 
adequate to so great a disobedience of orders. — 
Head Quarters, k.th May 1850. 

Revised Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and 
allowances for four months. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, 19th Mag 1850. 



Gunners Patrick Collins and John Hynes, 3rd Company, 
2nd Battalion Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 7th April 
1850. 

Charge. — Having stolen from the Tosha Khanah, or 
State wardrobe and jewel house at Lahore, two gowns and 
parts of four gowns, value eight rupees or thereabouts, the 
property of the British Government. 

Finding. — Patrick Collins, Not Guilty ; John Hynes, 
Guilty. 

Sentence. — On Gunner John Hynes. — Transportation for 
three years. 



145 



Revised. — That the Court may direct the sen- 

See 37 Section Mu- teilCe 011 Gunner John HyiieS, to 

n^E^ean&ps: commence from the expiration of 
(sa.) c. j. n. ^ s £ ormer sentence of seven (7) 

years' transportation, in which the lesser sentence 
will otherwise merge. 

Revised Sentence. — Transportation for three years to 
commence at the expiration of any sentence of transporta- 
tion which may have already been awarded against 
him. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, \%th 
May 1850. 



Private John Creane, H. M. \%th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Meemt, 3rd May 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Having with a bayonet stabbed Private 
John Roache, same Regiment, with intent to murder ; 2nd, 
Stabbing, as in 1st charge, with intent to do some grievous 
bodily harm. 

Finding. — 1st Charge, Not Guilty; 2nd Charge, Guilty. 
Sentence. — Transportation for fifteen years. — Approved 
and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I am surprised that the Court permitted 
the Deputy Judge Advocate to hold such dictatorial 
language as he did. In addressing the Court as 
Prosecutor, he says, " I have to add, that if the 
" Court convict the prisoner under the 1st charge, 
" they should acquit him under the 2nd charge, 
" and vice versa." This is the language of a 

u 



146 



learned Judge from the Bench instructing an 
ignorant Jury, and not that which becomes a 
young Officer to a Court Martial, composed of 
Officers, the youngest Captain on which is ten 
years his senior in the service, and, probably, his 
superior in knowledge of Military law, of which 
Captain and Brevet Major Wiggens has, in this 
trial, shewn himself to be very ignorant. 

2nd. In drawing up the proceedings of this 
trial, the President should not have allowed the 
Deputy Judge Advocate to have inserted "con- 
ducting the trial, Major E. Wiggens, officiating 
Deputy Judge Advocate General." The Deputy 
Judge Advocate General does not conduct a trial. 
The Articles of War expressly charge the Pre- 
sident of the Court with all the duties and details 
of conducting the trial ; he is to make the Mem- 
bers take their seats according to their rank ; he 
clears and re-opens the Court when necessary ; he 
preserves order ; he collects the votes ; no ques- 
tions are put but through him and by his per- 
mission, or by that of the Court. The Judge 
Advocate cannot interfere with any thing of his 
own authority in the proceedings of a Court 
Martial, for which the President and Members are 
alone responsible. — Head Quarters, 16th May 
1850. 



147 



Promotion Rolls. 

Head Quarters, Simla, 6th June 1850. 
Notwithstanding the repeated orders that have been 
issued regarding the necessity for all 

G. 0. 9th Sept. 1843. & ° _ T J . 

„ nth Dec. 1843. documents sent to Head Quarters being 
" " complete in themselves, without referring 

to any other source for their elucidation, several of the rolls 
of Native Officers and non-Commissioned Officers recom- 
mended for promotion, recently received in the Adjutant 
General's office, contain the names of individuals proposed 
to be passed over, with no other information concerning 
them than the remark, " passed over before," or " fre- 
quently passed over before," observations in themselves 
wholly unintelligible, and oftentimes calling for troublesome 
search to discover when and for what reason the parties 
Can-oils Code, Cap. s0 adverted to had been considered unfit 
LVIII, Sec.%\. for further advancement. The attention 
of Commanding Officers is now called to the General 
Order, dated 6th November 1813, which requires that the 
cases of such men shall be fully explained, and reference 
to rolls previously furnished thereby avoided. 

No promotion rolls, in room of men invalided, are, in 
future, to be forwarded for submission to His Excellency, 
until the General Orders transferring the parties to the 
Invalid Establishment, who occasion the vacancies required 
to be filled up, shall have been published ; and when the 
seniors of the different grades are recommended for ad- 
vancement, the insertion of additional names in the rolls, 
as is now sometimes done, is quite unnecessary, and not 
to be permitted. 



Some of the non-commissioned Officers at present hold- 
ing situations in the Commissariat department having been 



US 



found very deficient In the qualifications necessary to fit 
them for the correct discharge of the duties of their several 
situations, the Commander in Chief desires that all men 
whose names have either been entered on the list of can- 
didates for such situations, or who may hereafter apply to 
be placed there, shall obtain from the nearest Commissariat 
Officer a certificate of their fitness for the duties of the 
appointment they apply for, particularly as regards their 
knowledge of the Native languages, and their ability to 
read and write and keep accounts; without such certifi- 
cate no non-commissioned Officer or Soldier will in future 
be appointed a Cattle Sergeant or to the Commissariat 
department. 

Courts martial. 

Juswunt Sing, Subadar, \st Seikh Local Infantry. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Hosheyarpore, 31st 
May 1850. 

Charge. — Being drunk on parade. 
Finding. — G uilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for three months. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quar- 
ters, 5th June 1850. 

Private Michael Hughes, H. M. 32nd Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Jullunder, 20th 
May 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Habitual drunkenness ; 2nd, Having when 
a prisoner for the offence stated in the first charge rushed 
past the sentry and struck Sergeant James Lees, a violent 
blow on the face. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years ; and to be put 
under stoppages of a penny a day for two years. — Ap- 
proved and confirmed. 



149 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The prisoner is a very young man, and 
his character has been good, but his Captain com- 
plains that for some months past he has been ad- 
dicted to drunkenness, and this has ended, as might 
be expected, in his having committed a great mili- 
tary crime. Had the prisoner been an old Soldier, 
I would not have remitted one hour of his impri- 
sonment, but as he is so young a man, I will leave 
him in the hands of Lieutenant Colonel Markham 
to remit any portion of the punishment he pleases ; 
and I am sure that Sergeant James Lees will 
willingly pardon this young vagabond the insult 
which he offered to him. The prisoner is to be 
kept in strict confinement with the Eegiment until 
Colonel Markham returns, as that Officer signed 
the order for his confinement. I have given Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Markham the opportunity of remit- 
ting the punishment of this young Soldier for two 
reasons : first, his Lieutenant Colonel and Captain 
are better able to judge from the offender's charac- 
ter whether there is any chance of reclaiming him 
from the infamous course of drinking, which he 
has lately fallen into ; and secondly, because the 
good conduct of the 32nd Regiment is such that 
there is no want of any severe example in that 
excellent Regiment. — Head Quarters, 1st June 
1850. 



150 



Lieutenant E. O. Bradford, Artillery. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 23rd May 
1850. 

Charges. — For conduct highly unbecoming an Officer 
and a Gentleman, in the following instances : 

1st. In having, at or near Calcutta, on or about the 8th 
of December 1846, failed to redeem his promissory note 
for 800 Rupees, dated Dum-Dum, 5th August 1846, and 
endorsed by Lieutenant Walter Delane and (the late) Lieu- 
tenant Graham, of Artillery : and having by such failure, 
imposed upon the endorsers of the note the necessity of 
paying the amount to Messrs. Allan and Thomas, Attornies 
for the Cawnpore Bank, who had negotiated the promis- 
sory note. 

2nd. In having, at Umballah, dishonorably, and with- 
out the consent of Syed Ahmed, Arab horse dealer, to 
whom, in payment of a debt of 1,700 Rupees, he had given 
an order on the Pay department, dated Cawnpore, 12th 
June 1849, for monthly deductions of 100 Rupees from his 
pay and allowances, and without the consent of the Secre- 
tary of the North-Western Bank of India, to whom the 
said order had been sold by Syed Ahmed, in a letter dated 
the 28th of August 1849, countermanded the said deduc- 
tions in full, and directed in lieu thereof, that 50 Rupees 
monthly only should be paid in liquidation of the said debt ; 
and further, in having, at the same place, in two letters, 
one written on or about the 12th of December, and the 
other dated the 15th of December 1849, dishonorably 
directed the discontinuance of any payment under the sub- 
stituted order referred to. 

Finding. — 1st charge, Guilty ; 2nd charge, Guilty, except 
as to the words " in a letter, dated the 28th of August 1849, 
countermanded the said deduction in full and directed in lieu 



151 



thereof that 50 Rupees monthly should be paid in liquida- 
tion of the said debt." 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, 5th June 1850. 

Private George Webb, H. M. 10th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Fort William, 28th 
May 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Being drunk when brought into Fort 
William, at or about tattoo; 2nd, Outrageous and insubor- 
dinate conduct, having when in the congee house for the 
offence set forth in the first charge, struck Sergeant John 
Fermoyle, of the congee house guard. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for seven years. — Approved 
and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 8th June 1850. 

Private George Carter, H. M. 70th Foot. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, on the same day. 

Charges. — 1st. For highly insubordinate conduct, on 
the 12th April 1850, when a prisoner in the congee house, 
Fort William, under sentence of a Court Martial for a 
former offence, in having said to Sergeant John Hall, the 
Provost Sergeant, with reference to Lieutenant Pilling, the 
Officer in charge of his (the prisoner's) company, " Damn 
Mr. Pilling, if he does not take care of himself, when I 
come out of confinement, I will break his bloody head," or 
used words to that effect. 

2nd. For having, when brought a prisoner to the Orderly 
Room, on the morning of the 15th April 1850, for the 
offence set forth in the first charge, thrown his forage cap 
at the table where Lieutenant Colonel Galloway, his Com- 
manding Officer, was sitting, saying, take that, that he did 



152 



not care if he was flogged or transported, or used words to 
that effect ; such conduct being outrageous and subversive 
of good order and military discipline. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, 6tk June 1850. 

Private Patrick McClennand, II. M. \8th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Meerut, 27th May 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Stealing a pair of ammunition boots ; 2nd, 
Repeated use of threatening language to Corporal Francis 
Hughes, in saying that whenever he came out of confine- 
ment " he would dirty his firelock to take his (Corporal 
Hughes') life," or words to that effect. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — (Previous convictions and general very bad 
character) Fifty lashes ; imprisonment for one year ; forfei- 
ture of all claim to pension and additional good conduct 
pay ; and the Court recommends that the prisoner be dis- 
charged from Her Majesty's service with ignominy. — Ay- 
proved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 8th June 1850. 

Private Charles Blake, H. M. \8th Foot. 
Tried by the same Court Martial, 28th May 1850. 
Charge. — Disgraceful conduct, in stealing four bottles of 
Beer from the premises of Lieutenant Colonel Ponsonby. 
Finding . — G u i 1 ty . 

Sentence. — (Previous convictions and general very bad 
character) Fifty lashes ; imprisonment for one year ; forfei- 
ture of claims; and discharge with ignominy recom- 
mended. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 8th 
June 1850. 



153 



First Lieutenant George Holland, Artillery. 
Tried by General Court Martial, at Peshawur, 31st May 
1850. 

Charge. — For conduct unbecoming an Officer and a 
Gentleman, in having, at Peshawur, up to the present 
date, 22nd of March 1850, neglected to liquidate his debt 
to the Mess of the 57th Regiment Native Infantry, amount- 
ing to 540 Rupees, incurred at Saugor in the years 1844 
and 1845, although in a letter, dated Subathoo 2nd of 
May 1848, to the address of the Mess President of that 
Regiment, he had declared that he had entered into arrange- 
ments for the speedy liquidation of the same, and in having 
taken no notice of letters dated respectively 16th Novem- 
ber 1849, 6th of January 1850, and 28th of January 1850, 
addressed to him by the Officer commanding the 2nd 
company 4th battalion Artillery, his immediate Command- 
ing Officer, calling upon him for payment of the debt, or 
an explanation of his conduct. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Loss of twenty-five steps. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, 16th June 1850, 



Yussuff Ally, Resaidar, 16th Irregular Cavalry. 

Tried by General Court Martial, at Rawul Pindee, 30th 
May 1850. 

Charge. — For conduct highly unbecoming a Native 
Officer, in the following instances : 

1st. In having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 25th 
of March 1850, falsely complained to Lieutenant Smith, 
16th Irregular Cavalry, that Jemadar Bucktour Sing, the 
Woordie Major of the Regiment, had instigated the men of 
the troop under his, YussufF Ally, Resaiclar's command, to 

W 



154 



disobey his orders ; and that the Woordie Major threw im- 
pediments in the way of his properly performing his duty. 

2nd. In having, at Rawul Pindee, at the festival of the 
Buckree Eed, on or about the 28th October 1849, wantonly 
and intentionally insulted the religious prejudices of the 
Woordie Major, Bucktour Sing, by killing one or more 
cows in, or in the immediate vicinity of, the lines of the 
Regiment. 

3rd. In having, at Rawul Pindee, on or about the 2nd 
and 4th August 1849, caused Niamutyar Khan, Sowar, of 
the third troop of the same Regiment, to sing in the lines, 
in presence of several persons, a song, in which very dis- 
respectful allusions were made to the Commanding Officer 
of the Regiment, and to the Woordie Major Bucktour Sing. 

Finding. — Guilty, but the occurrences, in the second and 
third instances took place at Hosheyarpore. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, \Qth June 1850. 



Captain A. G. Brine, H. M. 32?id Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Jull under, 5th June 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st Charge, for having, at Jullundur, on or 
about the 9th and 28th of October 1849, neglected his 
duty as Captain of the company to which the late Private 
J. Craney and J. Hardinge belonged, in not having secured 
and taken inventories of their effects, as directed in the 
31st Article of War. 

2nd Charge, for having, at Jullundur, between the 
30th of March and the 28th of April 1850, repeatedly 
and pertinaciously refused to give in writing an explanation 
which had been required by the Pay Master, and ordered 



155 

by the Officer commanding the Regiment, of the reason 
of there having been but his own signature to the inventories 
of the effects of the deceased Soldiers mentioned in the 
first charge and, of the reason of the delay which had 
occurred in sending in those inventories to the Pay Master. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be severely reprimanded. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Brigadier Wheeler is hereby directed to 
reprimand Captain Brine severely, if his state of 
health appears to justify it ; but the prisoner's 
conduct has been altogether so very extraordinary, 
that the Brigadier is requested to consult the Me- 
dical Officers of Captain Brine's Regiment as to the 
state of that Officer's health, before the Brigadier 
executes the sentence of the Court, and he is to be 
guided by the opinion expressed by those Medical 
Officers, as to whether the reprimand ought to be 
inflicted or not, reporting what is done to me. — 
Head Quarters, 16th June 1850. 

Private John Springett, H. M. 14th Light Dragoons. 

Tried by General Court Martial, at Lahore, 6th June 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Lahore, on the 24th of 
April 1850, been absent without leave from punishment 
drill, and so continued absent for about three hours. 

2nd. For having, at the same time and place, when a 
prisoner in the main guard, made use of highly insubor- 
dinate language regarding his Commanding Officer Lieu- 
tenant Colonel J. W. King, C. B., saying that he was 



156 



a coward and had ran away from the Regiment at Chillian- 
walla, and that he, the prisoner, would knock his bloody 
old head off, or used words to that effect. 

3rd. For having, at the same time and place, made use 
of highly insubordinate language to Sergeant G. Guise, of 
the same Regiment, saying that he would shift his bloody 
ear, or used words to that effect. 

Finding. — Guily. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes and imprisonment for eighteen 
months. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, \6th 
June 1850. 

Private John Lavery, 2nd European Bengal Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Agra, 14th June 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. Absence without leave. 

2nd. Firing a musket, loaded with powder and metal 
buttons, and thereby wounding an old man. 

3rd. Firing among the police who were attempting to 
apprehend him, and wounding a chowkedar, the two last 
charges being felonious and in breach of the Articles of 
War. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for twelve months, with soli- 
tary confinement the first fourteen days in the 6th, 7th and 
8th months. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 
26th June 1850. 

Private Edward Mallon, H. M. 29th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Meerut, 30th May 
1850. 

Charge. — Having thrown his forage cap at and therewith 
struck Lieutenant Colonel Congreve, commanding the 
Regiment. 



157 



Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for life. — Approved and con- 
firmed.— Head Quarters, \Qth June 1850. 



Subadar Asghur Ally, 1st Seikh Local Infantry. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Jullundur, 12th June 
1850. 

Charge.— In having, at Jullundur, on the 3rd of August 
1849, when in command of the jail guard, with a vievv to 
obstruct inquiry into the circumstance of the escape of a 
State prisoner named Jehan Sing, from the jail at Jullun- 
dur, falsely reported to the late P. Mackeson, Esquire 
Deputy Collector at Jullundur, that the jail guard was all 
present, he, Subadar Asghur Ally, well knowing that 
Pertab Sing, Naick of the same Regiment, one of the said 
guard, who was suspected of connivance at the escape of 
the State prisoner from the jail, was not present with the 
guard, but had deserted. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence.— Suspension from rank, pay and allowances for 
six months.— Approved and confirmed. —Read Quarters 
29th June 1850. V *' 



Private Timothy Donovan, H. M. 18th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Meerut, 12th June 
1850. 

Charges.-lst, Being drunk; 2nd, Having when about to 
be confined for that offence, rushed at and struck with his 
fist, Corporal Henry Hamilton of the same Regiment. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

^^.-Imprisonment for two jezrs.-Approved and 
confirmed.— Head Quarters, 29th June 1850. 



158 



Private John McLean, H. M. \Ath Light Dragoons. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 3rd June 
1850. 

Charges. — For highly outrageous and insubordinate con- 
duct, in having, on a parade of the Regiment, at Lahore, 
on the 20th of March 1850, after having undergone corpo- 
ral punishment by sentence of a Court Martial, advanced 
towards Lieutenant Colonel J. W. King, C. B., command- 
ing the Regiment, in a threatening manner, using grossly 
abusive language to that Officer ; and in having violently 
resisted the escort which secured him. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for seven years. 

Revised. — In revising the proceedings of the 
Court, I am obliged to call its attention to some 
facts which demand the most serious notice. 

1st. The prisoner was allowed to get drunk 
in the guard room of Her Majesty's 14th Light 
Dragoons, when under sentence of a Court 
Martial. 

2nd. The prisoner was brought drunk to the 
parade. 

3rd. Assistant Surgeon Fasson, whose business 
it was closely to have examined the state of the 
prisoner who was about to suffer corporal punish- 
ment, did not examine him, and did not perceive 
that he was intoxicated, till drink and the pain of 
punishment had made him so furious, that the As- 
sistant Surgeon's own words are "7 thought he 
mud be either mad or drunk." 



159 



4th. The Adjutant Lieutenant Apthorp, equally 
unobserving with the Assistant Surgeon, did not 
find out that the prisoner was drunk till after he 
had received punishment. 

5th. The consequence was that this Soldier was 
flogged when in a state of intoxication, and all this 
took place in presence of Lieutenant Colonel King, 
the Commanding Officer of the Regiment. 

6th. When freed from the triangles, the pri- 
soner infuriated by having drank nearly two bottles 
of Arrack and some Beer in the guard room, as 
proved before the Court, became outrageous and 
abusive, as might have been foreseen. 

7th. I ask the Court therefore to re-consider 
and to mitigate its sentence, for however disgrace- 
ful and insubordinate the conduct of the culprit 
may have been, it was certainly as much produced 
by neglect of duty in others, as by the drunkard 
himself. The sentence appears to me to be severe 
beyond all proportion to the crime, in the peculiar 
circumstance above stated. — Head Quarters, 18th 
June 1850. 

Revised Sentence. — The Court adheres to its former 
sentence. 

I am sorry that the Court felt itself called upon 
to adhere to a sentence, which I have no power to 
commute, and cannot, in the extraordinary circum- 
stances of the case, execute ! I have therefore no 
alternative but to pardon the prisoner ; not excused 



160 



by his drunkenness, but by facts stated in my 
remarks to the Court on its proceedings being re- 
vised — I assure the Court, that great severity, 
without a due consideration being given to circum- 
stances, is not justice, nor conducive to discipline. 

The prisoner is to return to his troop. — Head 
Quarters, 1st July 1850. 

Private Thomas Fiman, H. M. 22nd Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Subathoo, 20th June 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Disrespectful language to Sergeant Sa- 
muel Bozman ; 2nd, Striking with his fist and thereby 
knocking down the said Sergeant George Bozman. 

Finding. — Guitly. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment with hard labour for seventeen 
months. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quai-ters, 29th 
June 1850. 



Jemadar Jehanghcer Khan, 7 th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Loodianah, 25th 
June 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, For neglect of duty, in having, at Loo- 
dianah, on the 7th of May 1850, when on duty at the 
quarter guard of his Regiment, and having been duly in- 
formed about midnight that an alarm of fire had been 
sounded by other Regiments, failed to cause the alarm to 
be sounded at his guard ; and in having made no report of 
the occurrence next day when relieved from duty. 

2nd. For highly unbecoming conduct, in having, at 
Loodianah, on the following morning when relieved from 



161 



duty, falsely reported that when the alarm of fire took place, 
he was not informed of it ; and in having repeated the 
same false statement before a Court of Inquiry at Loodi- 
anah, on the 9th of May 1850. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the Service. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I will commute the prisoner's sentence 
into suspension from rank, pay and allowances, for 
the space of six months, from the date of these 
remarks. — Head Quarters, 3rd July 1850. 



Private Jeremiah Brady, H. M. 32nd Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Jullundur, 28th 
June 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Habitual drunkenness ; 2nd, Losing or 
making away with regimental necessaries; 3rd, Having 
with a bamboo stick struck Sergeant C. J. McLenon, a 
violent blow across his back. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for two years ; fifty lashes ; 
stoppages for the necessaries missing, and further stoppages 
of one penny a day for two years. — Approved and confirm- 
ed. — Head Quarters, 3rd July 1850. 



Adjoodhea Pershaud, ( otherwise Nubbee Bux,) Sepoy, 
41s* N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 4th July 1850. 
Charges. — For having, on or about the 6th of June 1848, 
deserted from his Regiment stationed at Nusseerabad, and 

X 



162 



proceeded to Mooltan, where he entered as a Soldier into the 
service of the ex-Dewan Moolraj, then in arms against the 
British Government, and was taken prisoner on or about 
the 22nd of January 1849, on the capture of the Fortress 
by the British Government. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for life. — Approved and con- 
firmed. — Head Quarters, Ylth July 1850. 



Neezam Deen, Siddoo Sing and Rahim Bux, Sepoys, 
1st Seikh Local Infantry. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Jullundur, 3rd July 
1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Jullundur, on or about the 
22nd day of July 1849, when on sentry at the jail, through 
carelessness or neglect, suffered Jehan Sing, a State prison- 
er, in confinement in the said jail, to escape from his con- 
finement. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, Idth July 1850. 

Ruggonath Sing, Jemadar, 1st Seikh Local Infantry. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 5th July 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Jullundur, on or about 
the 22nd day of July 1849, when in command of the jail 
guard, without proper authority, released Jehan Sing, a 
State prisoner, then in confinement in the said jail. 

2nd. For having, at Jullundur, on or about the 3rd of 
August 1849, attempted to suborn false witness in the 
matter of the escape of the said Jehan Sing, by bribing 
Hyder Khan, jail Burkundauz, and soliciting Isur-toollah, 
Blacksmith, of the town of Jullundur, to depose that a 



163 



Native woman, named Nundee, otherwise Chuttakee, had 
been suborned as a false witness by Morad Buksh, jail 
Darogah. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, 13th July 1850. 



Gunner Charles McAllen, 1st Company, 5th Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 9th July 1850. 
Charges. — 1st, Habitual drunkenness; 2nd, Having 
struck and kicked Sergeant William Gordon. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for seven years. — Approved 
and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I think the sentence very lenient indeed. 
— Head Quarters, 16th July 1850. 



Private John Dugleby, H. M. \^th Light Dragoons. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 28th June 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Absence from his Regiment; 2nd, Losing 
or making away with Regimental clothing and necessaries ; 
3rd, Using grossly insubordinate and abusive language to 
Lieutenant Colonel King, his Commanding Officer in call- 
ing him an " " 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes ; imprisonment for two years with 
solitary confinement for the first fourteen days in the 4th, 
5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th months of each year ; stoppages 
for the articles lost or made away with. 



164 



Revised Sentence. — As before, except that the solitary 
confinement is omitted. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, \3th July 1850. 



Private Richard Geraghty, 2nd European Bengal 
Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Agra, 12th July 1850. 
Charge. — Stealing a silver watch, the property of a 
comrade. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence — (Previous conviction and general bad charac- 
ter) ; Imprisonment for two years with solitary confinement 
for the first fourteen days of the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 
9th months of each year. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The prisoner's guilt seems to arise from 
an inordinate love for liquor, and I will remit one- 
half of his punishment, in the hope that a year's 
imprisonment and the solitary confinement will 
work a salutary reform in his character. — Head 
Quarters, 21st July 1850. 



Sergeant James Scully, H. M. 98th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Peshawur, 25th 
June 1850. 

Charge. — Having feloniously and wilfully killed and 
murdered Isabella Lockwell, by striking her with a riding 
whip, on the head. 

Finding. — Guilty, with the exception of the words " and 
wilfully" " and murdered." 



165 



Sentence. — Transportation for seven years. — Approved 
and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 2^th July 1850. 



On the neglect of certain Commanding' Officers to 
read and explain the Orders for the cessation 
of Scinde Pay. 

Head Quarters, Simla, 29th July 1850. 

The orders issued by the Governor General and 
Commander in Chief, on the 25th of October 1849, 
were directed to be read and carefully explained to 
the Native Regiments of the Army. These orders 
were not obeyed by some twelve or thirteen Com- 
manding Officers, whose names I have only been 
able to collect within the last few days. 

The motive of those orders was to prepare the 
minds of the Sepoys for a reduction of pay, which 
they all expected ; but, though expected, it was 
right that the justice of that reduction should be 
made apparent to all. 

The importance of this order could not be dis- 
puted ; nor was it the question. 

The question was, were Officers commanding 
Regiments to decide, whether the orders issued to 
them, by the highest Authorities, were to be obey- 
ed, or disobeyed ? In other words, is discipline to 
exist in this Army, or not? That is the whole 
question. 

I will not publish the names of those Gentlemen, 
who seem to think that discipline is a thing that 



166 



comes of itself, and that its maintenance is unim- 
portant ! But I will express my approbation of 
those stern Soldiers, who did read and explain the 
orders referred to: who, scorning to allow a lax 
system to creep into their own sphere of command, 
hold discipline to be sacred ; to be the palladium of 
the Army; the guard of its honor; and the very 
source of its security. They justly feel that of this 
obedience, this discipline, they are the main sup- 
porters and the safeguard. 

The Commander in Chief is the person to order 
an Army into its just and proper positions : to 
promulgate all orders for its various branches : to 
establish and maintain a general system. 

The Generals of Divisions and of Brigades are 
responsible for the correct execution of the move- 
ments ordered, and for attention being paid to the 
established regulations. 

But Commanders of Regiments are the men who 
form the foundation on which the spirit and disci- 
pline of an Army rest. The first duty of these 
Commanders is to insure the full knowledge of the 
orders which issue from Head Quarters, and to 
enforce an exact obedience to them, in their res- 
pective Regiments. Commanders of Regiments 
form their Commanders of Companies ; and these 
last, under the watchful eye and constant instruc- 
tion of the Lieutenant Colonel, form the private 
Soldier. 



167 



Generals ought to have nothing to teach. They 
ought only to exercise the troops under their orders 
and watch that the Commanders of Regiments do 
their duty. 

But how are orders to be obeyed, if not circulat- 
ed and read to every Soldier in the Army ? It 
behoves every man in an Army to read, or hear 
read, every order that is issued by the Commander 
in Chief. 

The Commander in Chief issues these orders to 
Generals of Divisions. They, in turn, to Brigadiers. 
The latter issue them to Commanders of Regiments 
and Detachments ; and some of these Gentlemen 
fling the orders of superior authority into the .fire 
as so much nonsense ! But if a private Soldier 
disobeys their orders, they are ready enough to 
bring him to a Court Martial ! 

I will not dwell longer on this subject. I must 
leave it to the good sense of those Gentlemen, who 
have in the present instance disobeyed orders, to 
see the necessity of doing their duty more correctly 
in future, or they will vitally injure a service, for 
the honor and glory of which they would, to a man, 
lay down their lives on the field of battle. 

My period of service with this noble Indian 
Army will very soon close ; but while I am at its 
head, I wish to convince those, whose neglect in the 
instance which has elicited this order, and on whom 
its discipline so much depends, that zeal and pains- 



168 



taking can alone give a just effect to that brilliant 
courage, which the men who compose this Army, 
and especially its European Officers, have never 
failed to exhibit. Courage in single combats re- 
sults from personal skill and strength : in general 
engagements it is entirely the effect of that confi- 
dence which is produced by discipline. These are 
axioms which should be unceasingly impressed on 
the minds of all ; but especially on the minds of 
those who command Regiments. 

To those Officers who read and explained to the 
Sepoys the General Order of the 25th October 1849, 
I have only to express my satisfaction at such a 
soldier-like execution of their duty ; and I will con- 
clude by assuring them of the confidence which 
their proper estimate of their own high duties must 
ever give to the Commander in Chief of this 
Army. 

Courts martial. 

Ensign Charles Henry Bagg, H. M. 98th Foot 
Tried by General Court Martial at Peshawur, 15th 
July 1850. 

Charge. — For conduct unbecoming an Officer and a 
Gentleman, in appearing in a state of intoxication at a Ball, 
given by No. 1 Company, Her Majesty's 61st Regiment, on 
the night of the 22nd of May 1850, at Peshawur. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence — To be severely reprimanded, and to lose two 
steps in the list of Ensigns. — Approved and confirmed. 



169 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I pardon Ensign Dagg. His frank avowal 
of, and regret for his misconduct, together with his 
promise to be steady in future, convince me that 
no reprimand is necessary, though very properly 
sentenced by the Court. — Head Quarters, 2\th 
July 1850. 



Lieutenants William Mayne, John Baldwin and Henry 
Vansittart Pennefather, H. M. 22nd Foot, and Second 
Lieutenant Charles William Pownall Lillingston, H. M. 
60th Royal Rifles. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Simla, 25th July 
1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Subathoo, during the period be- 
tween the 18th and 21st of June 1850, inclusive, in breach 
of good order, and in disregard of Her Majesty's Regula- 
tions, in which gaming is positively prohibited, gamed and 
betted together at the game of backgammon, till consider- 
able sums of money had been lost by the three former 
Officers to the latter Officer. 

Finding. — (All pleaded Guilty,) Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be reprimanded in such way as the Com- 
mander in Chief may be pleased to direct. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Reprimand. — In the above case, there has not 
been any act of dishonor committed by the parties 
concerned. Lieutenants Mayne and Pennefather 
have brought high testimony to prove that their 
present painful position has been the result of a 

Y 



170 



momentary imprudence foreign to their usual 
steady conduct : I regret that the other two Of- 
ficers did not follow the same course. 

In reprimanding them all four, according to the 
sentence of the Court, I will hope that their express- 
ed contrition may be sincere ! Few men can lose 
money at play without great suffering : therefore, 
none ought to win without remorse : for what 
honest or generous man can find satisfaction in 
having mined his neighbour ? We may all be as- 
sured that the parable of the Priest, the Levite, and 
the Samaritan, was not imparted to men, that it 
should pass by unheeded. — Head Quarters, 29th 
July 1850. 



Major Benjamin Trarell Phillips, 7th Light Cavalry. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Jullundur, 22nd 
July 1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Jullundur, on the 7th of Sep- 
tember 1849, neglected to render prompt and efficient 
assistance to the Civil Authority, in the apprehension of 
certain Troopers and others belonging to the 7th Light 
Cavalry under his command, accused of having on that 
day murdered Munsubdar Khan, Naick, of the 37th Native 
Infantry ; and for having, during several subsequent days, 
obstructed the investigation instituted by the Cantonment 
Joint Magistrate at Jullundur, and failed to render him 
that aid which it was his bounden duty to afford. 

Finding. — Not Guilty, — most fully and honorably ac- 
quitted. — Approved and Confirmed. 



171 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I entirely concur in the complete and 
honorable acquittal of Major Phillips, and in so 
doing I feel bound to express my dissatisfaction at 
the conduct of both Major Hamilton and Major 
Palmer. These Officers appear to have passed 
over Major Phillips, and interfered in a direct and 
unauthorized manner with the Eegiment under his 
command. So far from having obstructed the 
Joint Magistrate in the endeavours of the latter 
to discover a murderer, it appears clearly that 
Major Phillips rendered his zealous assistance 
to Major Hamilton. — Head Quarters, August 3rd 
1850. 



Private Patrick Boyle, H. M. 18 th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Meerut, 16th July 
1850. 

Charge. — Having in his possession three pairs of boots, 
well knowing the same to have been stolen. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — (Former convictions and general very bad 
character) Fifty lashes ; imprisonment for eighteen months, 
with solitary confinement for the last fourteen days of each 
alternate month, viz. the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th, 12th, 
14th, 16th and 18th months, of such imprisonment ; and 
the Court recommend that the prisoner be discharged from 
Her Majesty's Service with ignominy. 

Revised. — The proceedings being irregular and 
sentence illegal. — Head Quarters, 24-th July 1850. 



172 



Revised Sentence. — Imprisonment as in the original sen- 
tence ; and forfeiture of all claim to pension, &c. ; and re- 
commendation for discharge as in original sentence. — 
Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 3rd August 
1850. 

Private John Dugleby, H. M. 14th Light Dragoons. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 18th July 
1850. 

Charge. — For highly insubordinate conduct, in having, 
at Lahore, on the 28th of June 1850, when called upon to 
make his defence before a General Court Martial, instead 
of doing so, taken occasion to vilify his Commanding 
Officer, Lieutenant Colonel J. W. King, C. B., (since 
deceased) by imputing to him cowardice in action on the 
13th of January 1849; and for having mutinously de- 
clared, at the same time, that so long as Lieutenant Colo- 
nel King commanded the Regiment, he, Private Dugleby, 
would do no more duty as a Soldier. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for fourteen years. 
Revised. — The sentence is illegal and must be 
changed. — Head Quarters, 24th July 1850. 

Revised Sentence. — Fifty lashes and imprisonment with 
hard labor for three years, commencing at the expiration 
of the imprisonment to which the prisoner had been previ- 
ously sentenced. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quar- 
ters, 1th August 1850. 

Private John McCormich, H. M. 29th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Meerut, 26th July 
1850. 



173 



Charges. — 1st, Habitual drunkenness ; 2nd, Disgraceful 
conduct in having dishonestly received and had in his 
possession certain articles of clothing, &c, well knowing 
the same to have been stolen. 

Finding. — 1st charge, Guilty ; 2nd charge, Not Guilty. 

Sentence. — (Previous conviction and general bad charac- 
ter) three months' imprisonment, and stoppages of a penny 
a day for twelve months. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, 3rd August 1850. 



Davy Sing, Sepoy, 44th JV. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Barrackpore, 26th 
July 1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Barrackpore, on the 19th of 
June 1850, lifted up against his superior Officer, Major J. 
Bartleman, commanding the Regiment, a loaded musket, 
which he presented at that Officer, at the same time threat- 
ening to shoot him if he did not keep off. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for life. — Approved and con- 
firmed. — Head Quarters, 7th August 1850. 



Lieutenant Hugh Rose, 3rd N. I., Deputy Assistant Quar- 
ter Master General. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Simla, 2nd August 
1850. 

Charge. — For conduct highly unbecoming an Officer and 
a Gentleman, in the following instances : 

1st. In having, at Simla, on the evening of the 24th 
of June 1850, falsely stated in the hearing of several per- 
sons, that at a ball which had been recently given at Simla, 



174 



Mr. John Lang, Editor of the Mofussilite Newspaper, was 
intoxicated, and dressed in a shooting coat. 

2nd. In having, on the same occasion, when contradict- 
ed by an Officer present, taken no measures to establish 
his own veracity, and to relieve himself of the imputation 
of falsehood conveyed in that contradiction. 

3rd. In having, at Simla, on the 29th of June 1850, 
when he received a letter of that date from Mr. Lang, 
couched in very offensive terms, accusing him of falsehood 
in his assertions made on the 24th of the month, and 
threatening him with personal chastisement, taken no steps 
to disprove to the proper Military Authorities the gross ac- 
cusations made against him in that letter, and instead of 
so doing, having on the 1st of July 1850, sworn the peace 
against Mr. Lang in the Civil Court at Simla. 

4th. In having, at Simla, on the 1st of July 1850, ap- 
plied to the Civil power to provide him with an escort of 
police on his way to the Court, to protect him from the 
violence of Mr. Lang, and in having availed himself of such 
escort in proceeding to the Court ; he being an armed 
military man; his conduct herein displaying a want of 
spirit unbecoming in an Officer in the Army. 

5th. In having, in a statement, dated Simla, 3rd July 
1850, made for the information of His Excellency the 
Commander in Chief, falsely represented that all he had 
said on the 24th of June 1850, regarding Mr. Lang, was, 
that when the ladies were going away (from the ball) Mr. 
Lang came down in a shooting coat whitened with the 
wall. 

Finding. — On the 1st instance of the charge, not guilty, 
as, though the Court are of opinion that Lieutenant Rose 
did make the statement as alleged in the charge, they 
do not consider that it was falsely made ; 2nd instance, not 



175 



guilty, 3rd instance, guilty, 4th instance, guilty, and 5th 
instance, not guilty. 

And the Court are further of opinion, that such conduct as 
contained in the two instances of the charge of which they 
have found him guilty, is unbecoming an Officer ; but the 
Court acquit him of the remainder of the charge. 

Sentence. — To be severely reprimanded in such terms as 
His Excellency the Commander in Chief may be pleased 
to direct. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Lieutenant Eose has been acquitted of 
three charges, and found guilty on two. He is 
sentenced to be severely reprimanded. 

The most severe, but at the same time the most 
just, that I can give to Lieutenant Eose, appears to 
me to be a summary of his own conduct as regards 
the two charges on which he has been found guilty. 

Proved to have been grossly insulted and threat- 
ened with personal castigation, by a Gentleman, 
whose physical powers Lieutenant Eose publicly 
declared to be inferior to his own, he took no one 
of those simple measures which it becomes a Bri- 
tish Officer to do, when grossly insulted. 

Among the steps which Lieutenant Eose ought 
to have taken, there were two so obvious as hardly 
to need being pointed out. They offended neither 
Military nor Civil law, and were in accordance with 
common sense. 

The one was for Lieutenant Eose immediately to 
have called upon the head of his department with 



17G 



Mr. Lang's letter in his hand, and declared his 
readiness to meet and disprove all assertions to the 
prejudice of his character, in any way that the 
Commander in Chief should direct. This Lieu- 
tenant Rose did not do till after he had adopted, 
and felt the result of, that line of conduct for which 
he stands condemned by the Court. It was then 
too late ! It then became a mockery. 

The other step which Lieutenant Rose might 
have taken was still more simple, more becoming, 
more efficacious, one perfectly justified by law, and 
by the conventional rules of society. It was to 
have applied his boasted superior physical strength 
to the defence of his person and his honor. 

As Lieutenant Kose has been acquitted by the 
Court of having given just cause for Mr. Lang's 
insulting letter, this last mode of proceeding must 
have met with the approbation of all honorable men. 

Lieutenant Rose is said to have been ill-advised. 
This may have been so, but he must take the res- 
ponsibility of having acted by that bad advice, and 
of having failed, in the most simple of all possible 
cases, to do that which, in the opinion of all honest 
men, was the proper mode for him to have main- 
tained the integrity of his own character as a Bri- 
tish Officer. — Head Quarters, lQth August 1850. 

Lieutenant Rose was released from arrest, but was not directed to 
resume his duties as Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General. 



177 



First Lieutenant Edmund James Goodridge, Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Simla, 16th August 
1850. 

Charge. — For conduct disgraceful to the character of an 
Officer and a Gentleman, in the following instances : 

1st. In having, at Simla, on or about the 2nd of 
August 1850, both at the public breakfast table at the 
Pavilion Hotel and afterwards, falsely declared that he had 
never said that a Gentleman, whom he then named, had 
been drunk at a Ball which took place at Simla on the 
20th of June 1850 ; whereas he had some little time after 
the date of that Ball, publicly stated at the table d'hote of 
the Pavilion Hotel, that the Gentleman adverted to, and 
whom he then named, was seen by him " beastly drunk" 
at the Ball, and that his attention had been attracted by an 
Officer to that Gentleman's condition at that time. 

2nd. In having, on the same occasion, when remon- 
strated with for his denial, and told that his previous con- 
trary assertions had been heard by several persons, declared 
that he was not going to make an enemy of the Gentleman 
alluded to, and whom he then named, for the sake of Lieu- 
tenant Rose, or words to that effect j he having been then 
summoned as a witness for the defence of Lieutenant Rose, 
3rd Native Infantry, at a General Court Martial at Simla ; 
and in having, at Simla, about the same time, expressed 
himself to the same effect to Captain T. P. Walsh, of the 
Madras Army. 

3rd. In having, in pursuance of his declared resolution 
not to make an enemy of the Gentleman adverted to, given 
his evidence evasively, when examined as a witness on the 
defence of Lieutenant Rose, at Simla, on the 3rd of August 
1850 ; and in having given evidence on that occasion 

Z 



178 



which differed very materially from what he had previous- 
ly stated at the Pavilion Hotel, as alleged in the conclusion 
of the 1st instance. 

4th. In having, at Simla, on the 5th of August 1850, 
when taxed by Captain T. P. Walsh, of the Madras Army, 
with having given evidence at the Court Martial differing 
from his previous statements, falsely declared " I'll take 
my oath I never made such statement," or words to that 
effect. 

5th. In having, at Simla, on the 7th of August 1850, 
falsely stated at the table d'hote at the Pavilion Hotel, that 
he had never denied having stated that the Gentleman 
adverted to, and whom he then named, was drunk at the 
Ball. 

6th. In having, at Simla, in a note dated 8th August 
1850, addressed to Captain T. P. Walsh, of the Madras 
Army, thus unwarrantably and falsely expressed himself ; 
" I now denounce your accusations as wholly, utterly and 
entirely false :" he, Lieutenant Goodridge, well knowing, 
that Captain Walsh's statements, regarding his conduct, as 
represented in the foregoing instances, were perfectly true. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, 19th August 1850. 

Remarhs hy the Court. — With reference to the finding 
on the 6th instance of the charge, the Court feel themselves 
called on to express their conviction that Captain Walsh 
was actuated in making his accusations by an honorable 
and soldier-like feeling. 

Jemadar Budloo Pandy, 64th N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Allahabad, 10th 
August 1850. 



179 



Charges. — 1st. For having, at Allahabad, on the 26th 
of June 1850, when commanding the guard over the State 
prisoners in that Fortress, in disregard of standing orders 
to that guard not to allow any Native stranger or any 
unauthorized person to communicate with the prisoners, 
sanctioned or connived at the admission of one Seetaram, 
a stranger, within the prison, and his communication with 
two of the State prisoners. 

2nd. For having, at the same time and place, taken no 
measures to secure the man Seetaram, when he was seized 
by Hyat Khan, one of the prisoners there confined. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, 2\st August 1850. 

Havildar Gungapersaud Pande, 64th 2V. I. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 12th August 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Allahabad, on the 26th 
of June 1850, when on guard over the State prisoners in 
that Fortress, in disregard of standing orders to that guard 
not to allow any Native stranger or any unauthorized per- 
son to communicate with the prisoners, sanctioned the 
admission of " Seetaram," a stranger, within the prison, 
and his communication with two of the State prisoners. 

2nd. For having, at the same time and place, taken no 
measures to secure the man " Seetaram," when he was 
seized by Hyat Khan, one of the prisoners there confined. 

Finding. — Guil ty . 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Approved and 
confirmed. — Head Quarters, 2lst August 1850. 

Private James Neal, H. M. 29th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Meerut, 16th Au- 
gust 1850. 



180 



Charges. — 1st, Disobedience to the command of a 
Corporal ; 2nd, Having struck the said Corporal, being in 
the execution of his office. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — (General bad character) Imprisonment for 
twelve months with solitary confinement for the first four- 
teen days of the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th 
months. — Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I am sorry that the Court has judged it 
proper not to attend to the letter from the Adjutant 
General of Her Majesty's Troops, dated Horse 
Guards, September 20th, 1837, which was, of 
course, laid before the Court by the Deputy Judge 
Advocate General. 

2nd. I limit the prisoner's punishment to eight 
(8) months' imprisonment, with 14 days of solitary 
confinement in the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th months, 
respectively. — Head Quarters, 25th August 1850. 



Private John Hanley, H. M. 98th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Peshawur, 18th July 
1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having been drunk when one of the 
regimental quarter guard 98th Regiment, at Peshawur, 
about the hours of nine and ten o'clock on the night of 
the 7th day of June 1850. 

2nd. For highly insubordinate conduct when brought 
before the Commanding Officer for the offence stated in 
the 1st charge, on the morning of the 10th day of June 



181 



1850, in raising his arm with a clenched fist to Sergeant 
Abraham Carbury, 98th Regiment, with the intention of 
offering violence in the presence of his Commanding 
Officer, in the orderly room of Her Majesty's 98th Regi- 
ment, at Peshawur. 

3rd. For having, at Peshawur, between the 31st day of 
May and the 10th day of June 1850, lost through neglect, 
or wilfully made away with, the following article of his 
regimental necessaries ; viz. one pair of regimental cloth 
trowsers. 

Finding. — Guilty, except as to the words " to Sergeant 
Abraham Carbury" in the 2nd charge. 

Sentence. — (Previous convictions and general very bad 
character) Transportation for seven years. 

Revised. — I cannot concur in the sentence, which 
I do not think is a just one, and I know it to be 
illegal. It appears to me unjust, because if all the 
charges were proved, I do not think they would 
demand such severity of punishment. But they 
are not all proved; on the contrary, the Court 
have acquitted the prisoner of the only thing con- 
tained in these charges, that could subject him to 
transportation. 

2nd. Lieutenant Peyton says, that the prisoner 
is a " very bad" character, but offers no proof of 
this, nor do the man's previous convictions ! I do 
not say that he is not a " very bad" man, but I do 
say that no proofs are given of this, and such are 
necessary, and should be given in a general way, 
when character is called for by the Court, expressly 



182 



for its " own guidance in awarding punishment, as 
" well as that of the confirming authority in sanc- 
" tioning its being carried into effect." 

3rd. As the prisoner is acquitted of having 
offered violence to Sergeant Carbury, the Court 
have no power to transport him, and must revise 
its sentence. — Head Quarters, 3rd August 1850. 

Revised Sentence. — Fifty lashes and eighteen months' 
imprisonment, with solitary confinement for the last four- 
teen days of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th months. — 
Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I remit ten months (10) of the sentence. 
The remaining eight months (8) are to be inflicted 
with solitary confinement for the last fourteen days 
of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th months. — Head Quar- 
ters, 2Sth August 1850. 



Assistant Surgeon E. J. Kennedy, M. D., H. M. QAth Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Kurrachee, 23rd 
July 1850. 

Charge. — For conduct unbecoming the character of an 
Officer, and to the prejudice of good order and Military 
discipline, between the 8th and 17th of May 1850, in the 
following instances ; viz. 

1st Instance. — For neglect of duty and gross disobe- 
dience of orders, at Camp Kurrachee, in not having attend- 
ed to his Medical duties at the Hospital of Her Majesty's 
04th Regiment, although directed by me to do so in a 
Regimental Order, dated the 7th of May 1850. 



183 



2nd Instance. — For neglect of duty and gross disobe- 
dience of orders, at Camp Kurrachee, in having failed to 
attend to his Medical duties at the Hospital of Her Majesty's 
64th Regiment, although directed so to do by Surgeon 
Archer, Her Majesty's 64th Regiment, his superior Officer, 
by an order conveyed to him in a Memorandum, dated 8th 
May 1850. 

3rd Instance. — For neglect of duty and gross disobe- 
dience of orders, at Camp Kurrachee, in having failed to 
attend to his Medical duties at the Hospital of Her Majesty's 
64th Regiment, on the 13th of May 1850, although ordered 
to do so by his superior Officer, Surgeon Archer, Her 
Majesty's 64th Regiment, conveyed to him in a letter, dated 
13th May 1850. 

4th Instance. — For neglect of duty and gross disobe- 
dience of orders, at Camp Kurrachee, in having failed to 
attend to his Medical duties at the Hospital of Her Majesty's 
64th Regiment, on the 16th May 1850, although ordered 
by me his superior Officer so to do in a letter, dated 16th 
May 1850. 

5th Instance. — For having, at Camp Kurrachee, when 
called upon to explain his conduct, written a disrespectful 
letter to me his superior Officer, through the Adjutant of 
Her Majesty's 64th Regiment, to the following effect, viz. : 
" In which note I had meant to imply that I considered 
" the attention to the detail of the Medical treatment of 
" the women and children as a most annoying and incon- 
" sistent duty for a Military Surgeon, who, I consider, 
" would then find himself, notwithstanding his claims to 
" high respect and observance, placed on the same level as 
" a village country Apothecary." 

(Signed) J. Stopford, 
Lieut. Col. Comdg. H. M. 64tk Regt. 



184 



Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, 31s£ August 1850. 

Recommendation to Mercy. — The Court, having thus per- 
formed a painful duty in awarding a punishment commen- 
surate with the offence, of which the prisoner has been 
found guilty, beg leave to recommend his case to the mer- 
ciful consideration of His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief, for the Court are of opinion that Assistant Surgeon 
Kennedy may have been acting under a misapprehension 
of orders, inasmuch as that he may have considered that 
the few days' leave given him by his Commanding Officer, 
as adverted to in the Adjutant's letter of the 13th Ma^, had 
superseded the orders of his immediate departmental su- 
perior; and further, that the culpable manner in which he 
was acting was not clearly and distinctly pointed out to him. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I am sorry that I cannot comply with the 
recommendation of the Court. There appears to 
me no excuse for the prisoner's misconduct, and his 
defence is not one which gives any promise of his 
amendment. He seems to be above the duties of 
his profession, as he deems it beneath him to 
attend to the sick wives and children of British 
Soldiers. 



Narain Misser, Subadar, 1 5th N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Umballah, 2nd Sep- 
tember 1850. 

Charge. — For conduct unbecoming a Native Officer, in 
the following instances : 



185 



1st. Ill having-, at Umballah, during the months of 
May, June and July 1850, permitted part of his house in 
the lines of the Regiment, to be converted into a shop for 
the sale of milk, flour, tobacco, &c, by a Bunnea named 
Goordial. 

2nd. In having, at Umballah, on the 6th of July 1850, 
falsely stated to his Commanding Officer, that the stock in 
trade of the said Goordial, Bunnea, which was then in his, 
the Jemadar's house, were only articles required for the 
personal consumption of himself and his family. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances, for 
nine months. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 
7th September 1850. 



Private James Macliay, 2nd European Bengal Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Agra, 9th July 
1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Agra, on the night of the 25th 
of May 1850, murdered Rambuccus, Chowkeydar, by 
striking him with a stick, and thereby inflicting a mortal 
wound behind his left ear, of which he died on the 26th of 
May 1850. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Private J. Clarke is to be tried for the 
murder. — Head Quarters, &th August 1850. 



Private John Clarke, 2nd European Bengal Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Agra, 26th August 
1850. 

A 2 



180 



Charge. — For having, at Agra, on the night of the 25th 
of May 1850, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously killed 
and murdered Rambuccus, Chowkeydar, by striking him 
with a stick, and thereby inflicting a mortal wound under 
his left ear, of which he died on the 26th of May 1850. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I confirm the Court's verdict. Let the 
prisoner have the benefit of it ; but my own con- 
viction is different. — Head Quarters, lAth Sep- 
tember 1850. 



Lieutenant E. B. Litchford, 48th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 19th 
August 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Bandah, on the 29th of 
June 1850, given to Ensign G. C. Huxham, of the same 
Regiment, a challenge to fight a duel with him. 

2nd. For having, at Bandah, on the 30th June 1850, 
broken the arrest imposed upon him by the Officer com- 
manding the Regiment, by quitting his quarters without 
being set at liberty by proper authority, and proceeding, 
in disregard of the prohibition and warning of the Com- 
manding Officer, to fight a duel with Ensign Huxham. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation by the Court. — The Court having passed 
judgment, begs most respectfully to recommend the pri- 
soner to the merciful consideration of His Excellency the 
Commander in Chief, on account of past services and high 
character given him by his Commanding Officer. 



187 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Court has recommended the prisoner 
to mercy, but solely on the ground of his past 
services. 

Past services do not excuse such misconduct as 
that of which the prisoner has been found guilty, 
and therefore 1 cannot attend to the recommenda- 
tion of the Court. — Head Quarters, Simla, Wih 
September 1850. 



Ensign G. C. Huxham, 48th JV. I. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 21st August 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Bandah, on the 29th of 
June 1850, accepted from Lieutenant E. B. Litchford, of 
the same Regiment, a challenge to fight a duel with him. 

2nd. For having, at Bandah, on the 30th of June 1850, 
broken the arrest imposed upon him by the Officer com- 
manding the Regiment, by quitting his quarters without 
being set at liberty by proper authority, and proceeding, in 
disregard of the prohibition and warning of the Command- 
ing Officer, to fight a duel with Lieutenant Litchford. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation by the Court. — The Court unanimously 
and most strongly recommend the prisoner to the favorable 
consideration of His Excellency the Commander in Chief, 
as they have no hesitation in declaring, that considering 
the gross general unprovoked provocation he received, his 
youth and inexperience, the Court deem his conduct so 
natural and excusable, that had the law left any option the 
punishment awarded would have been very different. 



188 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — At the very strong recommendation of the 
Court Martial, I pardon Ensign Huxham; and I 
do so because, I will use the words of the Court,* 
" it was natural and excusable" for a young and 
untried Soldier to resent, as he did, the " gross and 
unprovoked provocation" of a much older one. — 
Head Quarters, 11th September 1850. 

Ensign T. W. White, 48 th N. I. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 26th August 1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Bandah, on the 30th of June 
1850, assisted as a second at a duel between Lieutenant 
E. B. Litchford and Ensign G. C. Huxham, of the same 
Regiment, notwithstanding that he, Ensign White, had 
been present when on that morning the Officer command- 
ing the Regiment had warned Lieutenant Litchford and 
Ensign Huxham against duelling, and had placed those 
Officers in arrest to prevent their fighting. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation by the Court. — The Court having passed 
judgment, beg most respectfully to recommend the prisoner 
to the merciful consideration of His Excellency the 
Commander in Chief, on account of his youth and in- 
experience. 

* Memorandum. — In the remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief, on the result of the General Court Martial on Ensign George 
Corham Huxham, of the 48th Regiment Native Infantry, published in 
General Orders of the 20th September, the sentence " I will use the words 
of the Court," is to be between parenthesis. Order books are to be 
corrected accordingly. — G. O, C. C, 21th September 1850. 



189 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I cannot attend to the recommendation of 
the Court on account of youth and inexperience. 
The prisoner is above 2 1 years of age ; he had the 
command of veteran Soldiers ; he has, I conclude, 
received the education of a Gentleman ; yet he has 
been the active promoter of a duel for which there 
was not the slightest pretext or any possible 
excuse whatever, except on the part of Ensign 
Huxham. 

In contrast to the conduct of Ensign White and 
Lieutenant Smith, I am bound to express my ap- 
probation of the admirable conduct of Ensign 
Ogilvie, who, throughout this proceeding, has acted 
with the greatest good sense, decision and honor 
both as an Officer and a Gentleman. — Head Quar- 
ters, Simla, 11th September 1850. 



Lieutenant G. S. Smith, 48th N. I. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 27th August 1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Bandah, on the 30th of June 
1 850, assisted as a second at a duel between Lieutenant 
E. B. Litchford and Ensign G. C. Huxham, of the same 
Regiment, although he knew that the Officer commanding 
the Regiment had placed those Officers in arrest in order 
to prevent their fighting a duel. 

Finding. — Guilty, with the exception, as regards Ensign 
G. C. Huxham only, of the words, " although he knew 
that the Officer commanding the Regiment had placed 
those Officers in arrest to prevent their fighting a duel." 



190 



Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation by the Court. — The Court, having passed 
judgment, beg most respectfully to recommend the prisoner 
to the merciful consideration of His Excellency the Com- 
mander in Chief, on account of his past services. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The recommendation of the Court on the 
score of former services cannot be attended to ; 
whatever these services may be, they are no excuse 
for such delinquency. — Head Quarters, Simla, 11th 
September 1850. 



Ensign Edgar Sandham, 1 1 th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Barrackpore, 6th 
August 1850. 

Charges. — First. For having, at Barrackpore, on the 
24th of May 1850, been late at drill parade, and insolent 
to the Adjutant when in the execution of his duty. 

Second. For having, at Barrackpore, between the 24th 
of May and 5th of June 1850, been late and absent from 
drill, and without sufficient cause; viz. on or about the 27th 
and the 28th of May 1850. 

Third. For having, at Barrackpore, on the 5th of June 
1850, in breach of his promise of amendment, given in 
writing on the 24th of May 1850, behaved with great inso- 
lence to the Adjutant on parade, he, Ensign Sandham, 
having drawn his sword and advanced with it towards the 
Adjutant in a threatening manner, exclaiming " who dares 
" to order me, who could force me ? I should like to see 
" the person that dares order me off' parade," or words to 
that effect. 



191 



Finding. — 1st and 2nd Charges, Guilty; 3rd Charge, 
Guilty, " with the exception of a breach of promise 
and of advancing on the Adjutant in a threatening 
manner." 

Sentence. — To be placed at the bottom of the list of 
Ensigns of his Regiment, and to be severely reprimanded. 

Revised. — Adjutant Dennys, Sergeant Major 
Hitchcock, Sepoy Gungadeen and Sepoy Sadoo 
Pandy are all the witnesses produced on this trial. 
The three first swear, in the most direct manner, 
that the prisoner advanced in a great rage upon the 
Adjutant and drew his sword. The fourth witness 
does not deny this fact, and corroborates all that 
the other three have stated. The prisoner offers no 
disproof whatever! Thus the whole of the 3rd 
Charge is proved in the most complete manner; 
yet the Court acquits the prisoner of that Charge 
in the face of all evidence ! I am perfectly at a 
loss to account for this, and I therefore return 
the proceedings for revision. I cannot sanction a 
finding in defiance of direct evidence, I think the 
sentence wholly inadequate. 

Revised Finding and Sentence. — Court beg most respect- 
fully to adhere to their former finding and sentence. — 
Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Being unable to discover any grounds 
whatever for the sentence of the Court, I cannot 
approve of its proceedings ; but in accordance with 
that sentence I severely reprimand this mutinous 



192 



Officer, Ensign Sandham, who presumed to draw 
his sword upon his superior Officer on the parade, 
for which he ought to have been cashiered. Fre- 
quent complaints of this Gentleman have come 
before me, and his Commanding Officer is therefore 
not to grant him any indulgence whatever till 
he learns how to conduct himself as becomes an 
Officer. — Head Quarters, Simla, 27 th September 
1850. 



Isfundiar Khan, Ressaldar, \Qth Irregular Cavalry. 

Tried by General Court Martial, at Rawul Pindee, 3rd 
September 1850. 

Charge. — For conduct highly unbecoming a Native 
Officer, in the following instances : 

1st. In having, at Hosheyarpore, at the festival of 
BuckreeEed, on or about the 28th October 1849, wantonly 
and intentionally insulted the religious prejudices of Buc- 
tour Sing, the Woordee Major of the Regiment, by killing 
one or more cows in, or in the immediate vicinity of, the 
lines of the Regiment. 

2nd. In having, at Rawul Pindee, on the 6th of June 
1850, presented to his Commanding Officer a petition, for 
transmission to His Excellency the Commander in Chief, 
in which unfounded accusations were made against the 
Woordee Major Bucktour Sing. 

Finding. — Guilty, " but that the petition which the pri- 
soner presented bears date the 5th June 1850, and not 1st 
June*, as stated in the charge." 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Confirmed. 



* So in General Orders,— charge states sixth of June. 



193 



Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I see such marked animosity evident in all 
the Native evidence, that I entertain great doubts 
regarding the truth of all their statements. I can- 
not acquit the prisoner of having acted culpably 
to a great extent. At the same time he had leave 
from his Commanding Officer to sacrifice the cows, 
on condition that they were to be killed outside of 
the cantonment limits, and the prisoner complied 
with that order. So far then as military discipline 
is concerned, he is guiltless. 

But supposing him to have been guilty of all 
the charges, as the Court think, and which I do 
not believe to be the case ; still it would be a hard 
measure of justice to dismiss a brave Officer, who 
has served with honor for fifty years, because he 
so far forgot his duty as to join in religious animo- 
sity. I therefore commute the prisoner's sentence 
to suspension for six months, and he is, in the pre- 
sence of all the Officers, to acknowledge he was 
wrong to write the petition to me, dated 5th June 
1850, and also he is to beg pardon of the Woordee 
Major for the language used therein as regards the 
said Woordee Major. — Head Quarters, 28th Sep- 
tember 1850. 



Jehangeer Khan, Jemadar, \6th Irregular Cavalry. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 7th September 
1850. 

b 2 



194 



Charges. — For conduct highly unbecoming a Native 
Officer, in the following instances : 

1st. In having, at Hosheyarpore, at the festival of the 
Buckree Eed, on or about the 28th October 1849, wantonly 
and intentionally insulted the religious prejudices of Buck- 
tour Sing, the Woordee Major of the Regiment, by killing 
one or more cows in, or in the immediate vicinity of, the 
lines of the Regiment. 

2nd. In having, at Rawul Pindee, on the 1st of June 
1850, presented to his Commanding Officer, a petition for 
transmission to His Excellency the Commander in Chief, 
in which unfounded accusations were made against the 
Woordee Major Bucktour Sing. 

Finding. — Guilty, " but that the petition which the pri- 
soner presented bears date the 5th June 1850, and not 1st 
June, as stated in the charge." 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service. — Confirmed. 

Recommendation by the Court. — The Court having 
awarded a punishment proportionate to the offence of 
which they have found the prisoner guilty, and taking into 
consideration the mitigating circumstances given in evi- 
dence by Captain Davidson and Lieutenant Smith, do 
beg most earnestly to recommend him to the merciful 
consideration of His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Taking all the circumstances of the case 
into consideration, I think the sentence very severe, 
and I willingly comply with the recommendation 
of the Court, and pardon the prisoner, in consider- 
ation of his long and gallant service ; but I do this 
on the condition that he makes an apology to the 



195 



Woordee Major, in the presence of all the Officers 
of the Regiment. — Head Quarters, 2Sth September 
1850. 



Goolaub Doobey, Naick, 54th N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial, at Barrackpore, 4th 
September 1850. 

Charge. — Desertion from his Regiment. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for life. — Approved and con- 
firmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Though I think the sentence just, it is 
severe, and I do not consider that I shall injure 
discipline by commuting it to imprisonment for 
seven (7) years, which I accordingly do. — Head 
Quarters, 20th September 1850. 



©ambling" at Simla. 

Head Quarters, Simla, 11th Ootober 1850. 

Remarks on the proceedings of a Court of Inquiry held 
by my order at Simla, from the 17th August last to the 
23rd ultimo, at the request of Mr. MacChlery, of the Honor- 
able Company's Civil Service. 

These proceedings have been instituted at the request of 
Mr. MacChlery. 

It is my opinion, that he would have better consulted 
his own respectability had he not forced this inquiry. 

Neither Captain Ouvry's nor Lieutenant Draper's state- 
ments appear to me satisfactory. 



19G 



Captain Ouvry is gone, so I shall make no comment 
upon his statement. 

Lieutenant Draper appears to have joined Mr. MacChlery 
in concealing from Lieutenants Oakes and Bayley, that 
marks had been made on the cards with which they all 
four had played brag, and of which fact the two former 
gentlemen had become aware. 

Now, if the cards were designedly marked for the pur- 
pose of cheating, and the Court of Inquiry has pronounced 
its unqualified and decided opinion that they were so 
marked, it seems clear that one of these four gentlemen 
must have been the man who committed this act. 

It then became the duty of Mr. MacChlery and Lieu- 
tenant Draper to have, at once, declared the fact to the 
other gentlemen, and to have broken off all play with each 
other, till an inquiry should expose the cheat, and thereby 
clear the characters of the other three. 

This straightforward course was not followed by Mr. 
MacChlery and Lieutenant Draper : they concealed their 
discovery that the cards were marked. 

The result is, that when the fact became public, and it 
was believed that one of four players must have done the 
deed, it also came out that two of these players had con- 
cealed the circumstance from the other two ! and, moreover, 
that the two who concealed the marking of the cards, 
having this fact in their possession, sat down to play 
together against the other two ! This was wrong. 

There is no proof elicited by the Court, which of these 
four players marked the cards ; but it appears that while 
Mr. MacChlery and Lieutenant Draper imprudently con- 
cealed this circumstance, Lieutenants Bayley and Oakes, 
when they learnt the fact, instantly and honorably called 
for public inquiry, that the cheat might, if possible, be 



197 



discovered and their own characters be cleared from 
suspicion. 

One circumstance alone prevents my ordering the three 
Officers before a General Court Martial, for disobedience 
of the General Orders issued against gambling by my 
predecessors, Lords Dalhousie and Gough, dated the 16th 
August 1831 and 26th June 1845. This circumstance is, 
that I have no power to take notice of Mr. MacChlery's 
conduct. He is not amenable to the orders of the Com- 
mander in Chief. 

Therefore, not considering Lieutenant Bayley to be a 
gambler, I can only regret his having been so imprudent 
as to join those who appear to be so ; but I reprimand 
Lieutenant Oakes and Lieutenant Draper for their direct 
and premeditated breach of discipline, and I desire that no 
indulgence whatever be granted to either of these gentle- 
men by their respective Commanding Officers, while I remain 
in command of this Army. 

Courts Martial. 

Ensign C. T. Seale, H. M. 94th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial, at Bangalore, 16th 
August 1850. 

First Charge. — For conduct to the prejudice of good 
order and military discipline, in having, at Cannanore, on 
the night of the 20th of June 1850, when on the sick 
report, left his quarters without leave, and appeared on 
the roads of the cantonment. 

Second Charge. — For conduct unbecoming the character 
of an Officer and a Gentleman, and to the prejudice of 
good order and military discipline, in having, at the time 
and place stated in the first charge, been drunk when on 
the sick report. 



198 



Third Charge. — For having, at the same place and on 
the same day, as stated in the first charge, sent a verbal 
challenge by Lieutenant George Noble Bredin, of Her 
Majesty's 94th Regiment, to Ensign Henry Jameson, of 
the same Regiment, to fight a duel. 

Fourth Charge. — For conduct unbecoming the character 
of an Officer and a Gentleman, in having, at the time and 
place stated in the first charge, in conversation with Lieu- 
tenant Francis Dalmahoy Wyatt, of Her Majesty's 94th 
Regiment, stated, with reference to the challenge he had 
sent to the aforesaid Ensign Henry Jameson, that he meant 
to put a bullet through his (meaning the said Ensign 
Henry Jameson's) " bloody carcase," or used words to the 
same effect. 

The above being in breach of the Articles of War. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from Her Majesty's Service. — Ap- 
proved and confirmed. 

Remarks by the Court. — The Court has received, with 
disapprobation and great regret, the distinctions drawn by 
some of the witnesses, in giving their evidence on the 
charge of drunkenness against the prisoner. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief in India. — I have seen in the proceedings 
of various Courts Martial witnesses so weak that 
they have not been able to make up their minds 
to give a manly and decided answer to the ques- 
tion put by the Court, and say whether a man was 
drunk or sober! This is a great proof of indecision 
of character and want of confidence in themselves ; 
it is very pitiable ! A man must be either drunk 



199 



or he must be sober. When a Court asks which, 
it does not want the witness to answer by giving a 
graduated scale of inebriation; it wants a simple 
answer to a simple question. "Was the prisoner 
drunk or sober? yea or nay?" I am not at all 
surprized at the remarks appended to the proceed- 
ings of the Court. — Head Quarters, 1th October 
1850. 

Assistant Farrier and Saddler Sergeant Joseph McKeon, 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial, at Bareilly, 21st Sep- 
tember 1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Bareilly, on the 10th day of 
July 1850, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously killed and 
murdered Sarah Juliet McKeon, his wife, by stabbing her 
with a sword, and thereby inflicting a mortal wound be- 
neath her right breast, whereof she soon after died. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Death by hanging. — Approved and confirm- 
ed. — Head Quarters, 2nd October 1850. 

Private Richard Everett, H. M. 96th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Cawnpore, 24th Sep- 
tember 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Disobedience ; 2nd, Highly insubordinate 
and violent conduct in striking Lance Corporal John 
Horam; 3rd, Continued violence and most insubordinate 
conduct in again striking Lance Corporal John Horam. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for five months, with solitary 
confinement for the first fourteen days of the first month 



200 



and the last fourteen days of the last month. — Approved 
and confirmed. — Head Quarters, 5th October 1850. 

Supersession of Native Officers. 

Head Quarters, Simla, 18th October 1850. 

The Commander in Chief, having reason to believe that 
the G. O. C. C. of the 5th May 1837 is very generally 
misunderstood and injudiciously applied, desires to remind 
Commanding Officers that this order refers exclusively to 
the promotion of Sepoys to Naick, and in no way autho- 
rizes the very objectionable practice which has of late, in 
many cases, obtained of undervaluing and disregarding the 
claims of long service in old and meritorious Non-com- 
missioned Officers, who have nothing against their charac- 
ters or conduct, but who have been passed over in promo- 
tion and superseded by men, not of more worth but of 
more pretension and smarter appearance ; a partial and 
improper exercise of authority which, if persevered in, 
cannot fail to be productive of disaffection and discontent, 
not only in the minds of those whose claims and merits 
have been so undeservedly overlooked, but also in Regi- 
ments generally. 

A case of the above description has been brought to 
His Excellency's notice, of a Naick having been promoted 
over no fewer than 17 of his seniors, for the sole purpose 
of gaining for him the situation of Drill Havildar. In the 
same Regiment a Sepoy, 23rd on the roll of his company 
and 216th on the gradation roll of the Regiment, was at 
the same time promoted and appointed Drill Naick. It is 
impossible to conceive that the Naicks passed over in this 
case were all unworthy and unfit for advancement, or for 
the situation of Drill Instructor ; or that the Sepoys su- 
perseded were in like manner all disqualified and unfit to 



201 



be made Naicks : these capricious and injudicious promo- 
tions were therefore very properly cancelled by the superior 
authority on the spot. 

The Commander in Chief now directs that the fullest 
consideration and attention shall invariably be given to the 
claim of seniority in every grade, where no such disquali- 
fication as want of respectability, of character, or other 
equally proper and just cause of objection to the advance- 
ment of the seniors, shall exist ; and in order to enable 
General Officers and Brigadiers to use their authority in 
enjoining the strictest observance of this order in the Re- 
giments under their control, Commanding Officers in pro- 
mulgating promotions, made by them in Regimental Orders, 
will at the same time publish the names of those passed 
over and the causes of their supersession. 



^Evidence of claim to Family Pension. 

Head Quarters, Simla, 19th October 1850. 
Many instances of fraudulent admission to family pension 
having of late been discovered, resulting in numerous 
Courts Martial, His Excellency the Commander in Chief, 
with the view of establishing additional checks to imposi- 
tion, and of securing proof of the evidence given by parties 
in support of such cases, is now pleased to direct that on 
all occasions of the assembly of Committees for the inves- 
tigation of claims to pension, Officers commanding and in 
charge of the companies to which the men had belonged, 
shall invariably attend, and summarily enter on the first 
page of the sheets of record which were appropriated to the 
deceased during life, the evidence which may be given in 
support of the claim to pension preferred by the heir, as 
thus : 

c 2 



202 



" Pension on account of the late Ram Sing, Naick, 
claimed by Simkee his widow, at a Committee held at 
Barrackpore on the 21st June — ." 

" Claim supported by Dabee Sing and Toolsee Sing, 
Sepoys, of No. — Company, who have solemnly affirmed 
before the Committee that they know the claimant to be 
the widow of the deceased." 

This entry is to be at once signed by the parties who 
have given evidence, and attested by the Officer command- 
ing or in charge, and the Pay Havildar of the Company. 
The sheets are then to be returned for deposit in the Ad- 
jutant's Office, and may be produced at any time hereafter, 
as an original document before a Court Martial or Court 
of Inquiry, in proof of the evidence given in the case. 



Courts Martial. 

Shaick Kurrimlmx, Havildar, Calcutta Native Militia. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Barrackpore, 23rd 
September 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For disgraceful conduct, in having at 
Allipore, on the 16th of July 1850, fraudulently caused to 
be concealed in his own house a bag containing cash to 
the amount of Rupees 340, or thereabouts, the property of 
Government, and part of the pay of the Regiment, with the 
intent to appropriate the same to his own use, and thereby 
to injure Government. 

2nd. For having, at the same place, on the afternoon 
of the same day, falsely reported to the Adjutant of the 
Regiment that the whole of the cash which had been that 
day under his, the Havildar' s, charge, had been stolen in 
an affray which had taken place near the lines. 

Finding. — Guilty. 



203 



Sentence. — Reduction to the ranks, and imprisonment 
with hard labor for two years. — Approved and confirmed. 
—Head Quarters, Uth October 1850. 



Summund Khan, Duffadar, 1st Irregular Cavalry. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 10th October 
1850. 

Charges. — For conduct highly unbecoming a Non-com- 
missioned Officer, in the following instances : — 

1st. In having, at Lahore, on or about the 31st of 
May 1850, first stated on oath, which he voluntarily took, 
that he knew Boawlee Bux, Sowar, of the same troop, to 
be a Khoodaspah (or horse owner) whereas he knew him 
to be a Bargeer of Murdan Khan, Sowar, same troop ; 
and having subsequently, at Lahore, on or about the 31st 
of May 1850, falsely stated, that he did not know whether 
he was or not, but that he was entered as such in the rolls 
of the Regiment. 

2nd. In having, at Lahore, on or about the 31st of 
May 1850, repeatedly and falsely stated upon oath, which 
he voluntarily took, after Lieutenant Chamberlain, his 
Commanding Officer, had duly warned him to be careful 
in what he stated, that Nishanburdur Amanut Khan and 
Hamed Khan, Sowar, had never been to his house, and 
that he had never conversed w r ith them on the subject of 
the said Boawlee Bux, or on the road returning from 
leave ; whereas he did converse with the persons above- 
named at his own village, and also on the road returning 
from leave, on or about the latter end of May 1850. 

3rd. For aiding and abetting in deceiving his Com- 
manding Officer, as regarded the said Boawlee Bux, by 
not stating all that he knew on the subject at Lahore, on 



204 



or about the 31st May 1850, when he had at his own 
house about the middle of May 1850, and in the lines of 
the Regiment on arrival at Lahore, on or about the end 
of May 1850, declared his intention of speaking to the 
fact of Boawlee Bux, being a Bargeer and not a Khoo- 
daspah. 

4th. In having, at Simla, on or about the 1st of July 
1850, preferred an improper and unjustifiable complaint, 
against his Commanding Officer, to His Excellency the 
Commander in Chief, stating, that he had been induced by 
his threats to resign the service of Government, thereby 
imputing tyranny to his immediate Commanding Officer, 
which he well knew to be false. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the Service. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Recommendation to mercy. — The Court beg respectfully 
to recommend the prisoner to the merciful consideration of 
His Excellency the Commander in Chief, in consequence 
of his length of service. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — In consequence of the prisoner's good 
character and long service, I will commute his 
sentence to that of being placed two steps lower 
in the list of the rank he held. — Head Quarters, 
17th October 1850. 



Private J. H. Kettlewell, H. 31. 18th Royal Irish 
Regiment. 

Tried by General Court Martial, at Meerut, 11th Sep- 
tember 1850. 



205 



Charge. — Striking Lance Sergeant James Fagan a 
severe blow with his fist. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for twelve months, with soli- 
tary confinement for the first fourteen days of the 2nd, 4th, 
6th, 8th, 10th and 12th months. 

I am obliged to revise the proceedings and to 
request that the Court will read and attend to 
the letter from the Horse Guards, dated 20th 
September 1837. — Head Quarters, %lst September 
1850. 

Revised Sentence. — Imprisonment for eight months with 
solitary confinement for the first fourteen days of the 2nd, 
4th, 6th and 8th months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — In consideration of the prisoner's good 
character, I will remit two months of his sentence. 
— Head Quarters, 17th October 1850. 



Subadar Soobah Sing, 1st Regiment Seikh Local 
Infantry. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Jullundur, loth 
October 1850. 

Charge. — Drunkenness on duty, while commanding a 
guard on the march. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowances 
for four months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Though I have confirmed the proceedings, 



206 



I consider that the prisoner has been very lenient- 
ly dealt with by the Court. — Head Quarters, 2ith 
October 1850. 



Gunner Robert Gibbs, 1st Company, 3rd Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Dum Dum, 1st 
October 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For having, at Dum-Dum, on the 26th 
August 1850, fallen out of the Squad with which he was 
at drill, without permission, and repeatedly refused to fall 
in again when ordered to do so by Drill Sergeant 
J. Jones, of the 3rd Battalion Artillery, in charge of the 
Squad. 

2nd. For having, at the same time and place, offered 
violence to his superior Officer, the said Drill Sergeant, 
J. Jones, being in the execution of his office, by advanc- 
ing upon him at the charge with a musket and fixed 
bayonet. 

3rd. For having, at the same time and place, when 
ordered into confinement, insubordinately thrown his 
musket and accoutrements upon the ground. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for one year. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — In accordance with the letter from the 
Horse Guards, dated 20th September 1837, and 
made applicable to the Company's European 
troops, and because the prisoner is a recruit, whose 
character has been good up to the time of his pre- 



207 



sent delinquency, I mitigate his punishment to 
four (4) calendar months. — Head Quarters, 21st 
October 1850. 



Private Charles Page, H. M. 60th Royal Rifles. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Kussowlie, 15th 
October 1850. 

Charge. — For highly insubordinate conduct. 

1st. In having, at Kussowlie, on or about the morning 
of the 28th August 1850, when in imprisonment by award 
of a European District Court Martial, positively refused to 
parade in marching order for the purpose of performing 
hard labor, it being part of the said award. 

2nd. For wilfully destroying his knapsack, it being part 
of his regimental necessaries. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes ; three months' imprisonment with 
hard labor ; and stoppages to make good the cost of the 
knapsack destroyed. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — Conspicuous valour is a noble quality in a 
Soldier ; but the possession of one virtue is no ex- 
cuse for the breach of a higher virtue : and disci- 
pline is a higher virtue than any other among 
Soldiers. 

In compliment to the excellent Regiment to 
which the prisoner belongs, and to its no less ex- 
cellent Commanding Officer, I allow Lieutenant 
Colonel Bradshaw to remit the flogging, if he thinks 
such leniency will have a proper effect in improv- 



208 



ing the conduct of the prisoner. — Head Quarters, 
Simla, 2lst October 1850. 

Ensign Edward Hunter, 24th N. I. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Benares, 23rd Sep- 
tember 1850. 

Charge. — For conduct unbecoming an Officer and a 
Gentleman, in the following instances : 

1st. In having failed to fulfil his engagement to liqui- 
date, by monthly instalments, a loan from the North Wes- 
tern Bank received by him at Lucknow in the month of 
May 1847, made to him on that condition, and for which 
the late Dr. Glennie was security, in consequence of which 
failure, the estate of the late Dr. Glennie was charged by 
the Bank at Meerut, in the month of March 1850, with 
about Rupees 400, on his, Ensign Hunter's, account. 

2nd. In having, at Goruckpore, on or about the 9th of 
April 1850, on false pretences, obtained leave to visit Be- 
nares from the 18th to the 30th of that month, ostensibly 
for the purpose of settling his debt to the estate of the 
late Dr. Glennie; and in having in a letter to the Adjutant 
of the Regiment, dated Goruckpore, 14th April 1850, 
falsely declared that his visit to Benares had reference to 
that object, whereas he thereupon made no arrangement 
for a settlement with the estate of the late Dr. Glennie, 
and on his arrival at Benares, on or about the 20th of 
April 1850, he informed the Assistant Adjutant General of 
the Division that his sole motive for obtaining leave of 
absence was to endeavour to obtain an audience of the 
Major General Commanding the Division, in order to make 
representations derogatory to his Commanding Officer, to 
the Adjutant of the Regiment, and to another Officer of 
that corps. 



209 



3rd. In having taken occasion of his visit to Benares, 
mentioned in the 2nd instance, in an interview with the 
Assistant Adjutant General, on or about the 20th April 
1850, disrespectfully and groundlessly to represent his 
Commanding Officer as incompetent to discharge his duties, 
and falsely to accuse the Adjutant of the Regiment of 
writing letters to him, Ensign Hunter, purporting to have 
been written by order of the Commanding Officer, but 
really written without such authority. 

Finding. — 1st instance, Guilty; 2nd instance, Guilty " of 
" having in a letter to the Adjutant of the Regiment, dated 
" Goruckpore, 14th of April 1850, falsely declared that his 
" visit to Benares had reference to settling his debt to the 
" estate of the late Dr. Glennie, whereas, on his arrival at 
" Benares, on or about the 20th April, he informed the 
" Assistant Adjutant General of the Division that his sole 
" motive for obtaining leave of absence was to endeavour 
" to obtain an audience of the Major General Commanding 
" the Division in order to make representations derogatory 
" to his Commanding Officer, to the Adjutant of the Re- 
"giment: and to another Officer of that corps;" 3rd in- 
stance and preamble, Guilty. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, 31si October 1850. 



Private John Murphy, H. M. 70th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Fort William, 14th 
October 1850. 

Charge. — For having, on the 8th of September 1850, 
between the hours of 4 and 5 o'Clock a. m., been asleep on 
his post when on sentry over the Ex Dewan Moolraj, a 
State prisoner in Fort William, Calcutta ; and for having, 

D 2 



210 



at the same time and place, divested himself of his jacket 
and accoutrements. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for six months. — Approved and 
confirmed. 

The Court beg respectfully to record their opinion that 
the prisoner, John Murphy, is a man of weak intellects. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Adjutant General of Her Majesty's 
Forces will be pleased to direct an enquiry to be 
made regarding the state of the prisoner's mind, 
and whether he is fit for the service.* — Head Quar. 
ters, 2>lst October 1850. 

Private John Chamberlain, H. M. \4th Light Dragoons. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 28th Octo- 
ber 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Desertion; 2nd, Having lost or made 
away with regimental clothing and necessaries. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for seven years. — Approved 
and confirmed. — Head Quarters, Simla, 4th November 1850. 

Private John Connors, H. 31. 18 th Royal Irish. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Meerut, 14th Octo- 
ber 1850. 

* The enquiry ordered having been made, the Commander in Chief 
directs that the sentence is to be carried into effect, under medical super- 
vision, and that a monthly report be made to the General Officer com- 
manding the Division within which the prisoner may be confined. 

The sentence of imprisonment is to be reckoned from the 16th of 
October last.— Adjutant Generals Office, Simla, 23rd December 1850. 



211 



Charge. — Having stabbed Private James Kelly with a 
bayonet and inflicted a wound in his left breast, with 
intent to do him some grievous bodily harm. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence-. — Imprisonment for six months with solitary 
confinement for the last fourteen days of the 2nd, 4th and 
6th months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Court has neglected to examine 
witnesses as to character, which is not only per- 
mitted by the Articles of War, and ordered, 
without latitude, by the Queen's Kegulations, but, 
in this instance, was especially necessary, that I 
might have some " guidance in sanctioning the 
punishments being carried into effect.' 7 As I 
have not this guidance, I authorize the Command- 
ing Officer of Her Majesty's 18th Regiment to 
mitigate the sentence at his own discretion, if the 
prisoner's character has hitherto been that of a 
good Soldier. If not, inflict the punishment. — 
Head Quarters, Ath November 1850. 



Private James Tongue, H. M. 29th Foot. 
Tried by the same Court Martial, 16th October 1850. 
Charge. — Desertion. 
Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — (Previous convictions and general very bad 
character) Fifty lashes and imprisonment for three months. 

Revised. — Her Majesty's Regulations prohibit 
corporal punishment for desertion. It is only ap- 



212 



plicable to the crimes stated in page 230, Section 
28.-24^ October 1850. 

Revised Sentence. — Imprisonment for six months with 
solitary confinement for the last fourteen days of the 2nd, 
4th and 6th months. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, 4th November 1850. 

Major John Bartleman, 44th N. I. 

Tried by General Court Martial in Fort William, 19th 
October 1850. 

Charge. — 1st. For scandalous infamous conduct, un- 
becoming the character of an Officer and a Gentleman, in 
having, at Barrackpore, under cloak of the almost paternal 
authority with which he had been entrusted by the father 
of Mrs. Shelton, the wife of Lieutenant Shelton, 38th Re- 
giment Native Infantry, in pursuance of a base endeavour 
to seduce the affections of that Lady, written to her, on or 
about the 22nd of August 1850, a highly unbecoming note, 
and afterwards authorized a person named W. P. Downing, 
an attorney, to communicate clandestinely with Mrs. Shel- 
ton in his behalf. 

2nd. For most disgraceful conduct in having, at Bar- 
rackpore, on the evening of the 24th of August 1850, per- 
sisted in entering the house of Lieutenant Shelton, with 
the express purpose of speaking to that Officer's wife, in 
his presence, in disregard of Lieutenant Shelton's positive 
and repeated prohibition ; in having persisted in remaining 
there, in spite of Lieutenant Shelton's remonstrances, and 
opposition ; in having, while there, basely availed himself 
of his superior strength to inflict personal chastisement on 
Lieutenant Shelton; and in having, shortly after leaving 
his house, returned again in company with Lieutenant 



213 



Shelton's Commanding Officer, and in having taken that 
opportunity to communicate with Mrs. Shelton. 

3rd. For disgraceful conduct in having, at Barrack- 
pore, a day or two after these occurrences, clandestinely 
received from Mrs. Shelton a note on the subject of them, 
which note he brought forward at a Court of Inquiry, on 
the 27th of August 1850, as a justification for his intruding 
himself into Lieutenant Shelton's house, as alleged in the 
2nd charge. 

Finding. — 1st charge, Guilty of conduct unbecoming 
the character of an Officer and a Gentleman, in having, 
at Barrackpore, in pursuance of an endeavour to seduce 
the affections of Mrs. Shelton, wife of Lieutenant Shelton, 
38th Light Infantry, written to her, on or about the 22nd 
of August 1850, a highly unbecoming note; but the Court 
acquit him of the rest of this charge. 

On the 2nd charge, Guilty, with exception of the words 
" basely availing himself of his superior strength," of 
which they acquit him. 

On the 3rd charge, Guilty, with exception of the words 
" disgraceful conduct," of which they acquit him. 

Sentence. — To be cashiered. — Confirmed. 

Recommendation by the Court. — The Court, having per- 
formed its duty, beg to bring to the notice of the Comman- 
der in Chief that, by the Articles of War, they have been 
compelled to pass the extreme sentence of cashiering 
upon the prisoner ; but considering the highly peculiar 
nature of this investigation, the dangerously trying position 
in which the prisoner found himself placed by circumstances 
resulting from one fault, which, however reprehensible, 
has still not always been considered as necessarily sub- 
versive of military discipline, the Court is induced to re- 
commend the long service of the prisoner to any favorable 



214 



consideration which the clemency of the Commander in 
Chief may be disposed to extend. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Court recommends the prisoner to 
the favorable consideration of the Commander in 
Chief, which in plain terms, is this ; to restore Mr. 
Bartleman to the command of the 44th Regiment, 
after the Court has branded him as " guilty of 
conduct unbecoming the character of an Officer 
and a Gentleman" in one instance ; and in another, 
as " guilty of disgraceful conduct." I cannot un- 
derstand the conduct of the Court, in thus endea- 
vouring to throw upon the Commander in Chief 
the odium of refusing that, which its own sentence 
renders it impossible for him to grant, without in- 
sulting the Officers of the Bengal Army in general, 
and those of the 44th in particular ! I must leave 
the Members of the Court to their own reflections 
on such a proceeding, feeling confident that many 
must have been adverse to this recommendation. — 
Head Quarters, 13th November 1850. 



Private John Burns, H. M. 9 th Lancers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Wuzeerabad, 31st 
October 1850. 

Charges. — 1st, Drunkenness when warned for Regimen- 
tal night guard duty ; 2nd, Having at the same time twice 
struck Sergeant John Crotty on the head with his fist. 

Finding. — Guilty. 



215 



Sentence. — (Previous conviction and bad character) fifty- 
lashes ; and twelve months' imprisonment with solitary con- 
finement for the last fourteen days of the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 
8th, 10th and 12th months. — Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Court should have attended to the 
letter from the Horse Guards, dated 20th Septem- 
ber 1837. I therefore mitigate the imprisonment 
to the term of eight (8) months, and 56 days' soli- 
tary confinement during that period. — Head Quar- 
ters, 12 th November 1850. 



Gunner Jeremiah Howe, 2nd Company, 2nd Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Peshawur, 12th 
November 1850. 

Charge. — Having knocked down with his clenched fist 
and afterwards kicked Bombardier John Leonard, his 
superior Officer in the execution of his office. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — (Previous convictions and bad character) 
Transportation for seven years. — Approved and confirmed. 
— Head Quarters, Camp, 24th November 1850. 



Lieutenant R. F. Fanshawe, Invalid Establishment, and 
Adjutant and Quarter Master of the European Invalids 
at Chunar. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Secrole, Benares, 
29th October 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For unofficerlike conduct and direct dis- 
obedience of the standing General Order of the 30th of 



216 



December 1823, in having, at Chunar, at various times 
between the 16th May 1848 and the 2nd of August 1848, 
borrowed several sums of money, amounting in all to nine 
hundred and twenty-two Rupees and eight Annas, (922-8-0) 
or thereabouts, from Sergeant George Hind, of the Euro- 
pean Invalids at Chunar. 

2nd. For highly unbecoming conduct, in having, at 
Chunar, between the 6th of January 1849 and the 28th 
of May 1 849, occupied and kept possession of a house be- 
longing to a widow named Zinut (commonly called French) 
without her consent and contrary to her wish ; and for 
having withheld from her the rent of the said house, 50 
Rupees per month, for the whole or a great part of the 
period of his occupation, until forced to pay it by awards 
of Courts of Request at the suit of Mrs. French, the rent 
for February, March, April and May, 1849, being still 
unpaid to Mrs. French. 

3rd. For highly unbecoming conduct, in having, at 
Chunar, between the 26th of June 1848 and the 29th May 
1849, inclusive, or for various periods respectively within 
that time, withheld their just wages from the undermen- 
tioned servants in his employ, viz. Soobratie, Besesur, 
Ghoon Ghoon, Dursun, Buchoo, Phulloo, Hingun, Be- 
haree, Bustee, Sajeawun, Kalechurn, Berjoo, Bechun, 
Ramjanee, Sona; thereby causing distress and loss to 
these individuals. 

4th. For having, at Chunar, between the 18th April 
1849 and the 3rd June 1849, fraudulently misapplied the 
sum of one hundred and thirty-four rupees and one pie, 
(Rs. 134-0-1) or thereabouts, being the aggregate of the 
estates of Bombardier P. Burke, Gunner W. Brown 
and Private T. Barron, deceased, with which he, Lieu- 
tenant Fanshawe, was entrusted for the purpose of distri- 



217 



bution to the heirs of the deceased, as the Officer in charge 
of the companies to which the deceased men belonged. 

5th. For having, between the 1st of March 1848 and 
the 3rd of June 1849, fraudulently misapplied the sum of 
thirty-four rupees, or thereabouts, drawn by him, as Ad- 
jutant of the European Invalids, which ought to have been 
paid, and is still due, to School Master Sergeant Walter 
Law, of the European Invalids. 

Of the first charge, guilty. 

Of the second charge, guilty, with the exception of the 
word " highly," substituting " about the middle of March" 
for " the 6th January," excepting the words " the whole or 
a great," excepting that there was only one award of a 
Court of Requests, and that the rent for February, March, 
April and May 1849 is still unpaid to the extent only of 
Company's Rs. 182 12 1 (one hundred and eighty-two 
rupees, twelve annas, and one pie) ; also that it appears the 
prisoner did not originally occupy the house without the 
consent of the owner. 

Of the 3rd charge, not guilty, and acquits him thereof. 
The Court find that the prisoner did owe the wages to the 
servants as stated in the charge, excepting to Phulloo, 
Hingun, Bustee and Ramjanee, but under the peculiar cir- 
cumstances of the case, attach no guilt to the fact. 

Of the fourth charge, guilty, with the exception of the 
word "fraudulently," and substituting " 4th August 1848," 
for " 18th April 1849." 

Of the fifth charge, guilty, with the exception of the 
word " fraudulently." 

Sentence. — To be very severely reprimanded. — Confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I am unable to understand upon what 

e 2 



218 



principle the Court found Lieutenant Fanshawe 
guilty of the first charge and yet fails to cashier 
this Officer? An Officer who is capable of writing 
a begging letter (asking for money) to a Sergeant 
under his command, is unfit to hold a commission, 
even had this act not been a direct breach of the 
General Orders, and had been the only one of 
which he has been convicted ! 

I am equally unable to understand upon what 
grounds the Court acquits the prisoner on the 
third charge? The Court finds that he, a British 
Officer, did owe money to his servants ; it is also 
proved that these poor men were much distressed 
thereby and, in consequence, were obliged to bor- 
row money ! Moreover, while Lieutenant Fanshawe 
did not pay these men their wages, this Officer 
kept three horses (for I am warranted in taking it 
for granted that he did not keep three grooms 
without he kept three horses) his duty being con- 
fined to the Fort of Chunar ! 

I do not know to what "peculiar circumstances" 
the Court can possibly refer, to excuse such an act 
of dishonesty and want of feeling? The only "pe- 
culiar circumstance" I can find, is that Lieutenant 
Fanshawe chose to contract debts which he well 
knew that he could not pay ! I cannot agree with 
the Court in its extraordinary opinion that " no 
guilt attaches to the fact" of not paying servants 
their just wages and forcing them to borrow money 



219 



in their distress ! I am inclined to believe that if 
the Government kept the Members of this Court 
eight months or a year out of their pay, we should 
hear very different sentiments expressed. 

Reprimand. — Lieutenant Fanshawe! your sen- 
tence is to be "severely reprimanded." I cannot 
understand why the Court Martial did not cashier 
you, as, in my opinion, it ought to have done. 
Public duty makes me regret that you have escap- 
ed from a just punishment, but I shall rejoice if 
the very lenient punishment inflicted may improve 
your conduct as a British Officer. — Head Quarters, 
27th November 1850. 



Private George Andrews, 2nd European Bengal Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Agra, 23rd Novem- 
ber 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. Having, at Agra, on the 22nd of 
October 1850, thrown a bottle at, and therewith violently 
struck Sergeant Daniel Donovan, of the 2nd European 
Bengal Fusiliers, his superior Officer, being in the execu- 
tion of his office, at the same time using disrespectful and 
abusive language to the said Sergeant. 

2nd. Having, at Agra, between the 15th and 22nd 
October 1850, lost through neglect, or designedly made 
away w r ith, one cloth shell jacket, being an article of his 
regimental necessaries. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Imprisonment for eight months with solitary 
confinement for the last fourteen days of the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 
and 8th months and stoppages for the jacket mentioned 



220 



in the 2nd charge. — Approved and confirmed. — Head 
Quarters, 4th December 1850. 

Gunner Henri/ Chafer, 3rd Company, 5th Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial, at Jullundur, 22nd 
November 1850. 

Charge. — For disgraceful conduct in the following 
instances : 

1st. In having, at Mooltan, on or about the 5th of 
June 1850, received and had in his possession a bill of 
exchange for Rs. (18 6 0) eighteen and six Annas, dated 
the 20th June 1849, drawn by the Deputy Collector at 
Ferozepore on the Deputy Collector at Jullundur, the pro- 
perty of Sergeant W. Henderson, of the Commissariat 
department, well knowing the same to have been stolen. 

2nd. In having, at the same time and place fraudulent- 
ly endorsed the bill of exchange, specified in the first 
instance, to himself, by writing thereon an order purport- 
ing to have been made by Sergeant Henderson, and 
making the same payable to him, Gunner Chafer ; and in 
having transmitted the said bill of exchange with such 
fraudulent and forged endorsement to the Deputy Col- 
lector at Jullundur for payment, with intent to injure 
Sergeant Henderson. 

Finding. — Not Guilty. — Approved and confirmed. — 
Head Quarters, Camp, 6th December 1850. 

Sergeant John Bird, 2nd Troop, 1st Brigade Horse 
Artillery. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Peshawur. 
Charge. — For disgraceful conduct, in having, at Pesha- 
wur, on or about the 10th of October 1850, indecently 



221 



assaulted Ann Foley, his step-daughter, a child between 
ten and eleven years of age, and attempted to ravish her. 

Finding. — Guilty, with exception to the words "and 
attempted to ravish her." 

Sentence. — Reduction to the rank and pay of a Gunner, 
and imprisonment for six months. — Approved and confirm- 
ed. — Head Quarters, 1th December 1850. 



Ressaidar Khodayar Khan, 5th Irregular Cavalry. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Mooltan, 26th 
November -1850. 

Charge. — Highly unbecoming conduct, in having, at 
Mooltan, on the 22nd October 1850, when on parade with 
the Regiment and checked by the Commanding Officer for 
being out of his proper place, disrespectfully replied to his 
Commanding Officer; and in having, when told if he spoke 
in that way he would be placed under arrest, insolently 
taken off his sword and thrown it down in front of his 
Commanding Officer, repeatedly saying "place me in 
arrest," and then, quitting the parade, without leave, pro- 
ceeded to the lines of the Regiment. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Suspension from rank, pay and allowance for 
three months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Recommendation. — The Court having performed the pain- 
ful duty of awarding punishment in strict conformity to an 
Article of War, beg, unanimously, and respectfully, to 
recommend the case of Ressaidar Khodayar Khan, of the 
5th Irregular Cavalry, to the merciful consideration of His 
Excellency the Commander in Chief, on the grounds of 
the prisoner's long and faithful service of 36 years, the 
favorable testimonials he has produced, and in considera- 



222 



tion of the prisoner's age, which may palliate infirmity of 
temper though it cannot altogether excuse it. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — 1st. I have great pleasure in attending 
to the recommendation of the Court in favor of 
this old and distinguished Officer, but he is to be 
told that such unjustifiable ebullitions of ill temper 
cannot be submitted to, and if he again trans- 
gresses, he will not again be pardoned. He is to 
return to his duty. 

2nd. The last witness for the prosecution states, 
in substance, that when a junior Officer is a more 
sharp and clever man than a senior Officer, the 
junior is given the command of the squadron while 
the senior commands the troop on parade. This 
may be, and I believe is the system in many Irre- 
gular Eegiments, and a very good one to make a 
show, but not to make a Regiment fit for service. 
It is well calculated to injure discipline and pro- 
duce Courts Martial, as it has done in the present 
case. — Head Quarters, 7th December 1850. 

Private William McKenzie, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Lahore, 25th Novem- 
ber 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For insubordinate conduct, in having, 
at Lahore, on the 9th of October 1850, declared on parade 
that he would not parade for inspection, which he had been 
directed to do as a punishment for previous misconduct; 
and in having, in pursuance of that determination, fallen 



223 



out of the ranks and thrown his musket and accoutre- 
ments on the ground. 

2nd. For gross insubordination, in having, at Lahore, 
on the 12th October 1850, at the orderly room of the 
Regiment, after having been warned for trial by a District 
Court Martial, said to the Adjutant of the Regiment " you 
may as well give me a General Court Martial, for I will not 
shoulder a firelock again in the Regiment," or used words 
to that effect. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes and six months' imprisonment. — 

Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — 1st. I pardon the prisoner and desire his 
Commanding Officer to admonish him as to his 
future behaviour, and that this sort of sulky con- 
duct cannot be permitted. 

2nd. I desire that the Commanding Officer of 
the Kegiment will be so good as to inform me — 

First. — Why the Officer commanding the com- 
pany, to which the prisoner belonged, did not tell 
off his own company? 

Secondly. — What Officers were on the parade ? 

Thirdly. — Why the Officer of the company did 
not speak to, and warn the prisoner of the danger 
he was incurring by his loss of temper and conse- 
quent insubordination? 

Fourthly. — Why the Commanding Officer • did 
not himself speak to the prisoner and admonish 
him, or if he did, why was not this stated on the 



224 



prosecution by the Prosecutor? All these matters 
ought to have been elicited by the Court, as the 
Prosecutor omitted to do so. It is the duty of a 
Commanding Officer to do all in his power to pre- 
vent crime by admonition ; and it is the duty of a 
Court, by questions, to ascertain how far a prisoner 
is really guilty in spirit as well as in fact. As far 
as I am informed by the proceedings, I think that 
the prisoner was guilty in fact, but that a little 
admonition and cool reasoning with him by the 
Commander of his company or of the Regiment 
would have put him right ; and therefore I have 
pardoned him in the belief that he will see his 
conduct was wrong, and in future that he will con- 
duct himself so as to prove my leniency has not 
been misplaced. — Head Quarters, Ath December 
1850. 



Gunner William Baker, 3rd Company, 2nd Battalion 
Artillery. 

Tried by the same Court Martial, 29th November 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For insubordinate conduct, at Lahore, 
on the night of the 9th October 1850, in having refused to 
return to his cot when ordered by his superior Officer, 
acting Staff Sergeant W. Hedley, of the same company. 

2nd. For insubordinate conduct, in having, at the same 
time and place, made use of highly abusive language to 
the said acting Staff Sergeant Hedley, drawn a bayonet on 
the escort ordered to convey him to the guard room, and 
threatened to stab any one who approached him. 



225 



3rd. For having, at the same place, on the 13th of 
October 1850, been drunk when a prisoner in the Artillery- 
division quarter guard. 

4th. For having, at the time and place last stated, 
thrown two glass bottles at, and with one of them struck, 
his superior Officer, Corporal J. Hill, of the 2nd Battalion 
of Artillery, being in the execution of his office. 

5th. For having, at the time and place last stated, 
thrown a brick at, and therewith struck Gunner R. Savage, 
of the 2nd Battalion of Artillery, on duty at the said 
guard, and one of an escort ordered to place him in close 
confinement. 

Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Fifty lashes and eight months' imprison- 
ment. — Approved and confirmed. — Head Quarters, Camp, 
7th December 1850. 



Private William Hafner, H. M. 24th Foot. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Wuzeerabad, 20th 
November 1850. 

Charge. — For having, at Sealkote, on the 7th day of 
October 1850, assaulted Private Patrick Walsh, of the same 
Regiment, by striking and kicking him on the head ; and for 
having, thereby, feloniously killed the said Patrick Walsh, 
by causing mortal injury to his brain, of which he soon 
after died. 

Finding.— Guilty. 

Sentence. — Transportation for seven years. — Approved 
and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The Soldiers of this Army will be so good 
as to observe what drunkenness leads to. Here is 

f 2 



220 



a man condemned to experience all the sufferings 
of transportation, with the additional horror of 
having slain his own comrade without provocation ! 
No comment is required. — The facts speak for 
themselves to every honest and right-minded man. 
— Head Quarters, 3rd December 1850. 



Private John Walsh, H. M. 80th Foot. 
Tried by General Court Martial at Dinapore, 24th Octo- 
ber 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For highly unsoldierlike conduct in 
having, in barracks, at Dinapore, on or about the 23rd of 
September 1850, discharged a musket loaded with powder 
and ball, while in the act of raising it to take aim at Color 
Sergeant John Bish, 80th Regiment, with intent to injure 
that non-commissioned Officer. 

2nd. For having, then and there, destroyed one round 
of balled ammunition issued to him for the public service. 

3rd. For having, then and there, by wilful violence 
rendered unserviceable a musket issued to him for the pub- 
lic service. 

4th. For having, at or about the time and place speci- 
fied in the preceding charges, lost through neglect, or 
designedly made away with, the following articles of Regi- 
mental necessaries, viz. ; one pair of white trowsers, one 
pair of blue trowsers, one white shirt, one flannel shirt, one 
pair of braces, and two pairs of boots. 

Finding. — Guilty, exception to the words in the first 
charge " while in the act of raising it to take aim at Color 
Sergeant John Bish, 80th Regiment, with intent to injure 
that non-commissioned Officer." 



227 



Sentence. — (No former convictions and general good 
character) Imprisonment for six months, with solitary con- 
finement for the first fourteen days of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 
4th months; and stoppages for the musket and other 
articles damaged, lost, or made away with. 

Revised. — The prisoner loaded his musket, and 
must have had some object in committing this dan- 
gerous and grave breach of discipline ? He then 
came out of his barrack room, and instantly fixed 
his eyes upon Sergeant Bish, whom he singled out 
among the three non-commissioned Officers that 
were there. — He was in a state of agitation, show- 
ing thereby that he meditated some mischief. — 
With his eyes still fixed on Sergeant Bish he raised 
his firelock and discharged it, as he raised it, in 
the direction of Sergeant Bish. — His finger must 
therefore have been on the trigger ; he then dashed 
his musket on the ground in a rage, and fled ! All 
this is sworn to by those present, who all give it as 
their opinion that he intended to fire at the Ser- 
geant ! The questions which naturally arise are : 
Why did the prisoner load his musket? Why did 
he cock it ? Why did he turn towards Sergeant 
Bish when he came out of his barrack room ? Why 
did be fix his eyes upon Sergeant Bish, who was 
lying down? Why did he raise his musket tow- 
ards Sergeant Bish, with his eyes still fixed upon 
the Sergeant ? Why did he fire his musket ? Why 
did all present think he intended to shoot Sergeant 
Bish? The prisoner makes no defence whatever. 



228 



He meets all accusations by silence! Yet the Court 
acquit him of " an intent to injure that non-com- 
missioned Officer." For my part, I am obliged by 
the evidence which is here recorded to consider 
that Private Walsh made a deliberate attempt to 
murder Sergeant Bish, and that he only failed be- 
cause his agitation made him press the trigger too 
strongly as he raised his weapon to accomplish his 
murderous purpose. Such is the view I take of 
the evidence, and I therefore beg of the Court to 
reconsider its finding and sentence. 

Revised Finding and Sentence. — Court adhere to their 
former finding and sentence. — Disapproved but confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — The finding and sentence appear to me to 
be so in the face of evidence that I am unable to 
understand them, or on what ground the Court 
bases them. — Head Quarters, 3rd December 1850. 

Phyoo Khan, Jemadar, 2nd or Hill Regiment of Seikh 
Local Infantry. 

Tried by General Court Martial at Hosheyarpore, 3rd 
December 1850. 

Charges. — 1st. For disobedience of orders and gross 
neglect of duty, in having, at Naree, on or about the 21st 
of July 1850, when in charge of prisoners being conveyed 
from Kangra to Hosheyarpore, failed to have four sentries 
at a time placed over the said prisoners. 

2nd. For having, at the same time and place, through 
carelessness and neglect of proper precautions, suffered 
Assa Sing, one of the prisoners under his charge, to escape. 



229 



Finding. — Guilty. 

Sentence. — Dismissal from the service.— Approved and 
confirmed. 

Recommendation by the Court. — The Court unanimously 
solicit His Excellency the Commander in Chief's consi- 
deration of the very high character given to the prisoner, 
and testimonial to his services in the field by his Com- 
manding Officer. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — It is with great difficulty that I pardon 
this Officer at the earnest entreaty of the Court. 
He was given full and distinct orders by his Com- 
manding Officer ; he disobeyed those orders, or did 
not take the necessary precautions that an Officer 
was bound to take, even had he not been warned 
by his Commanding Officer and Adjutant, as he 
had carefully been. However, I will pardon him 
at the entreaty of the Court, and on the high cha- 
racter given of him by his Commanding Officer, 
Major Ferris. He won his present rank by bravely 
capturing a colour from the enemy, and I hope 
that in thus pardoning him I shall not injure 
discipline. — Head Quarters, 12th December 1850. 

Issra Sing and Goordoss, Sepoys, 2nd or Hill Regiment of 
Seikk Local Infantry. 

Tried by the above Court Martial on the same day. 

Charge. — For having, at Naree, on or about the 21st of 
July 1850, when posted as sentries in charge of prisoners, 
through carelessness and neglect, suffered Assa Sing, one 
of the said prisoners, to escape. 



230 



Finding. — Issra Sing, Not Guilty; Goordoss, Guilty. 
Sentence on Goordoss. — Imprisonment with hard labor 
for six months. — Approved and confirmed. 

Remarks by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief. — I commute the sentence to three months' 
simple imprisonment, and I would not inflict that, 
had the prisoner not answered that his prisoners 
were all present. My reason for this leniency is, 
that his prisoners were not placed properly under 
the charge of Goordoss, and it was not clearly 
shown to be a matter of any difficulty for a pri- 
soner to escape. The prosecutor ought to have 
shown that the prisoners were so properly guarded 
that if the Sentry was vigilant no escape could have 
occurred. This has not been done. When Officers 
have prisoners to guard, they ought to take such 
precautions as to leave Sentries no excuse whatever 
for allowing one to escape. — Head Quarters, Camp 
Ferozepore, 12th December 1850. 



Farewell Address 

To the Officers of the Army. 
It would neither be justifiable nor becoming in 
me to interfere with the private affairs of Officers 
in the Army which I have the honor to command, 
so long as those private affairs do not interfere 
with the public service. But when they injure the 
public service, when they reflect disgrace upon our 
uniform, it becomes my duty to draw attention to 



231 



the subject and in this public manner to call upon 
the Officers of the Queen's and Company's services 
to exert themselves in maintaining the honor of 
their Regiments, by assisting the Commander in 
Chief in putting a check upon those whose debts 
are no less injurious to the fair fame of the Military 
profession, than discreditable to their Regiments 
and ruinous to themselves. 

It is more than one year since I received a very 
excellent letter, from a Brigadier, upon this im- 
portant subject. I had then just assumed my pre- 
sent command. I waited to see more clearly how 
matters stood, before I felt justified in touching 
upon affairs of so private a nature. From that 
time to this day a considerable portion of my time has 
been taken up in the examination of weekly, if not 
daily, complaints against Officers for non-payment 
of debts ; and, in some instances, the ruin of trades- 
men has been consequent on that cause. There is, 
therefore, a call upon me for this order; a call 
which cannot be cast aside. 

When it is considered that the Army is of an 
immense magnitude, I am bound to say that the 
number of Officers, who have misconducted them- 
selves, in a manner so derogatory to the character 
of Gentlemen, is not inordinate ; but at the same 
time it is so large as to demand repression with a 
strong hand ; and I do trust that the Officers of 
Regiments will take, not only vigorous, but rigo- 
rous, measures to bring those who are guilty to a 



232 

sense of shame at being ordered to appear before a 
Court of Requests for debt. An Officer, who is 
summoned before a Court of Requests, must feel 
conscious that, although wearing the British uni- 
form, he is not standing there in the character of a 
Gentleman ! He must feel, if he feels at all, dis- 
gust at his own degraded position. He may, by 
possibility, have been unfortunate; he may only 
have been thoughtless; but he must feel in his 
heart that he is, before the public, in a group with 
the infamous; with those who are cheats; and 
whose society is contamination. A well bred Gen- 
tleman cannot support this feeling ! 

I am not merely a rich man speaking to those 
who are poor. I have known poverty, and have 
lived for years on less than half what every Ensign 
in this Army receives, and so lived too in a more 
expensive country than India. I take no merit 
to myself for this : I only state it as a fact, that I 
may not be taunted, on the threshold of my argu- 
ment, by being told, I know nothing of the difficul- 
ties of poverty : I do know them perfectly, and I 
know more ; I know that every Ensign in India 
can live well on his pay ; and that many, who have 
never appeared before a Court of Requests, have 
largely assisted their families: largely, compared 
to their means. 

I do not say that a Subaltern Officer can give 
dinners; I do not say he can indulge in many 
luxuries ; I do not say he can cast off all self- 



233 



denial; nor do I see why he should do any of these 
things. The proceedings before these Courts of 
Bequests are the shameful proofs that he should 
not / When an Officer gets a Commission, he, with- 
out that labour which attends the initiation into 
most other professions, at once receives a good 
income, and that before he has any knowledge of 
his trade. In most other professions a young man 
hardly gets his food at the commencement. The 
families of many Officers, if not of all, have made 
great sacrifices to gain this amply sufficient income 
for these Officers, and these last have no right 
whatever to live as if they were Gentlemen of 
landed property ; nor as men do who have served 
longer and earned a higher rank and greater income 
than themselves. It is the desire to imitate those 
above us, and not to regard our own means, that is 
mischievous to all and most so to young men. 

The result is ruin to numbers. To show this, I 
will quote from two Brigadiers' letters, sent offici- 
ally for my perusal, upon this degrading subject. 
" At a Court of Requests held on the 6th instant, 
" there were 53 cases, and (with the exception of 
" 4, of trifling amount,) all against Subalterns — 
" amount 4,875 Rupees." Again, the same Officer 
writes, " Decrees of ' Execution General 1 are not 
" unfrequent, and the efficiency of the Officers seri- 
" ously affected by their pecuniary embarrassments" 
Again, " Although I am aware that it is very 

G 2 



234 



" difficult to control the expenditure of Officers, 
" yet, when they are brought forward thus publicly, 
" month after month, I consider it my duty to 
" bring to the notice of His Excellency the in- 
" volved circumstances of the Officers under my 
" command, with whom, in other respects, I have 
" no fault to find." 

Another Brigadier writes thus — " Another Offi- 
" cer I know enjoys Champagne Tiffins, leaving 
" his servants to drag him before the Court for 
" their just claims. How humilitating for those 
" connected with and proud of the profession I" 
Yes ! it is humiliating, and long experience tells me 
that it is to the exemplary conduct of Regimental 
Officers, and to the sentences of Courts Martial, that 
the army must look for correcting this baseness in 
individuals. That the Commander in Chief will 
support the Officers of Regiments I may venture to 
assert, whoever that Commander in Chief may be : 
but the close and dominating power, to keep down 
such misconduct, is in the messes. The man must 
be base, in every sense of the word, who can bear 
the contumely of his comrades, incurred by a dis- 
graceful action. But I must not confine myself to 
messes alone: Commanders of Regiments should 
strenuously exert themselves to maintain the good 
name of their Regiments : they should recollect that 
" Courts of Requests," when they decide that jus- 
tice to a tradesman, or other creditor, demands of 



235 



them to put an Officer under stoppages, pronounce 
that the said Officer is a man so lost to all sense of 
propriety that he endeavours to defraud his credi- 
tor, and therefore can no longer be considered in 
the light of a Gentleman ; he is forced to be honora- 
ble against his will; and it is the bounden duty of 
the Commanding Officer to refuse to such a person 
all indulgence, and to hold him so strictly in hand 
that such misconduct on the Officer's part may at 
all events be as disagreeable to that Officer him- 
self as it is to his Regiment and to his trades- 
men ! 

That I am not exaggerating these matters, I 
could easily prove by publishing such facts to the 
Officers of the two Armies, as would shock every 
honest and honorable man, and show how entirely 
I am authorized in saying, that these facts are to 
the last degree dishonorable. One Commanding 
Officer of a Regiment writes thus, " I can confi- 
" dently assert, that the numerous cases brought 
" monthly before the Courts of Requests are a dis- 
" grace to the Army we belong to." 

This is one among many who are labouring for 
the honor of the service. 

I have not sought for this information from 
Officers : these letters come uninvited from men of 
high rank in both the Queen's and Company's ser- 
vices ; and have been sent to me formally, as offi- 
cial complaints ! They are men who feel as every 



236 



Officer in the Queen's and Company's services 
ought to feel. 

But while stating how very disgraceful it is for 
an Officer to appear before a Court of Requests, I 
will say a few words upon the causes of such 
conduct. 

The first is, that some young men get Commis- 
sions without having had much education, or per- 
haps a vulgar one, which is worse. These Officers 
are not aware that honesty is inseparable from the 
character of a thoroughbred Gentleman. A vul- 
gar man who " enjoys a Champagne Tiffin and 
" swindles his servants" (as a Brigadier writes to 
me, when speaking of these matters and referring 
to an Officer under his immediate command), may 
be a pleasant companion to those who do not hold 
him in contempt as a vulgar knave — but he is not 
a Gentleman! His Commission makes him an 
Officer, but he is not a Gentleman ; and I claim 
that character in all its integrity for the Officers of 
Her Majesty's Service and for those of the Honor- 
able East India Company. I speak of men whose 
own misconduct has brought them into debt : not 
of those whom misfortune has thrown into debt. 
These last are very few in number, and very un- 
fortunate indeed to be on the same list with those 
whom they despise ! Of these who are so unfor- 
tunate I need not speak; their own exertions to 
pay their debts are unceasing and honorable. 



237 



The second cause is, that young men arrive in 
India, and think that, having escaped from school, 
it is manly to be dishonorable : so they cheat the 
Government, by not attending to their duties ; and 
they cheat their tradesmen, by not paying their 
debts. They meet Champagne-drinking swindlers 
who sponge on them, and lead them into expense. 
Thus comes debt; then Bankers are at hand to 
advance money : thus they become involved past 
redemption ; and soon the habit of being constant- 
ly in debt makes them grow callous to the proper 
feelings of a Gentleman ! 

Now, if all Officers Commanding Regiments were 
to do their duty (as great numbers do), and if the 
body of Officers of each Regiment would give such 
a Commander proper support, this course would 
not be followed by young men on their arrival in 
India. By strict lessons in their duties and plenty 
of drill, the Commanding Officers of Regiments 
would prevent Government being cheated; and by 
the proper gentlemanlike conduct and honorable 
sentiments which should pervade every Mess, repro- 
bating expense and extravagance of all sorts, and by 
practising rigid economy in the establishment, the 
young Officer would at once learn that to drink un- 
paid-for Champagne, unpaid-for Beer, and to ride un- 
paid-for Horses, is to be a cheat and not a Gentleman. 

The third cause of debt is the constant marching 
of Regiments. This has no remedy in time of War, 



238 



and I have strongly recommended that it should 
be, as much as possible, avoided in time of Peace. 
It is very severe on the Troops and on the State 
itself. The Governor General concurred in my 
recommendation, that the Troops should not be 
generally relieved this year, and I hope none may 
be moved for some years to come, if the Peace 
continues. However, these inarches ought not to 
throw careful and honorable men into debt. They 
are, when required, the proper and just demands 
of the service ; and every man can be, and ought 
to be, fully prepared to meet them. Still these 
marches are causes of difficulty ; and the diffi- 
culties, which result from them are, in some degree, 
excusable in very young and inexperienced men, 
but not so in old Officers, who have risen to the 
rank of Lieutenant. 

The fourth cause of debt is the extravagance of 
Messes. This I entirely charge upon the Command- 
ing Officers. Many Regiments (both Queen's and 
Company's) have economical Messes, especially in 
the Queen's Regiments, because the number of 
Officers in the latter is so large. But many Regi- 
ments are extravagant; and in all cases where a 
Mess is extravagant, the fault lies with the Com- 
manding Officer. I have heard it said by some, 
that " the Commanding Officer ought not to inter- 
" fere with the Mess, which should be considered 
u as the private table of the Officers." Now peo- 



239 



pie who talk thus, forget that there is a wide dif- 
ference between a Mess and a private Gentleman's 
table. The last is regulated by his income, and 
there is but one income and one Master to be con- 
sulted as to expense. But in a Mess there are 
many Masters, and the expense must be regulated 
by the income of the poorest. The majority have 
no right to crush the poor and prudent Officers, 
with the extent of whose liabilities they are utterly 
ignorant. Must an Officer, because he belongs to a 
Mess, explain all his distresses, his misfortunes, his 
generosities, his follies, to the Members of a Mess 
in order to prove his incompetency to meet its 
extravagance? Common sense forbids this ; yet, 
unless the Mess is on such economical footing as to 
enable the Ensign, on his pay, to join it, this in- 
fringement on a Gentleman's private liabilities and 
demands must take place ; and the Commanding 
Officer, alone, can protect every one under his 
orders from the, often insufferable, presumption of 
Mess Committees. He, alone, can properly direct 
and so rule matters that the Ensign can live on his 
pay, and live becomingly; that is to say, save on 
his pay ! I do n ot call drinking wine or beer, or 
inviting friends, " becoming." It may be so, or it 
may not, according to the means and feelings of 
each individual : all I maintain is, that the Mess 
must leave each Member free to do as his means 
enable him ; for each Officer is individually respon- 



240 



sible for his conduct to the public, from which he 
receives his pay. This is justice, and justice can 
never be wrong. 

The pay of an Ensign is sufficient for his just 
expenditure, and the Commanding Officer is, and 
can alone be, responsible that this rule of rigid and 
just economy is never infringed. What Officer 
will go to a Mess Committee and tell his private 
misfortunes, or his difficulties ? yet this is what those 
people (who say that the Commanders of Regiments 
ought not to interfere with the Mess) want! They 
are overbearing tyrants who want to set aside the 
private affairs of Officers, and to make those Offi- 
cers, who cannot afford such extravagance, pay for 
these persons' selfish enjoyments which they want 
to indulge in at other men's expense : That is the 
real object of those who wish to prevent the inter- 
ference of Commanding Officers ! But the rules of 
both Queen's and Company's Services give Com- 
manding Officers the right to interfere; and the 
Commander in Chief will take care to hold them 
responsible, that the Ensign has his rights; namely, 
the power to live at the Mess, as becomes an Officer 
and a Gentleman ; drinking water if he pleases, or 
drinking Champagne if he pleases ; but able, out of 
his pay, to liquidate his debts like a Gentleman, 
drinking what he may. That is to say that the 
necessary Mess' charges leave him enough out of 
his pay to cover all his other reasonable expenses. 



241 



The fifth cause of expense and ruin, I believe to 
be the Banks. They afford a ready means for the 
young and foolish to obtain money, but at an enor- 
mous interest. I have heard the objection to 
Banks contested, on the score that, formerly, Offi- 
cers, who now borrow from Banks, borrowed from 
Natives, and even from their own Soldiers ; that it 
is therefore better for an Officer to be in debt to a 
Bank than to Natives. I am unable to say what 
was formerly done; but I am perfectly sure that 
whatever facilitates the borrowing of money pro- 
duces ruin to young Officers, encouraging those 
vices which are the most mischievous, especially 
racing, a vice always accompanied by gambling and 
extravagance. 

Some of the evils which I have touched upon 
may be remedied by the Commander in Chief; 
some by Commanders of Regiments ; some by the 
Officers of Regiments, as bodies ; and some by indi- 
viduals themselves. To these I must leave them. 
I can only offer my advice as I quit the scene. 
To-day, I am Commander in Chief ; a week hence, 
I shall be no more to the Armies of India than a 
private Gentleman. But the Armies of India must 
ever be much and dear to me! For nine years my 
whole energies, such as they are, have been devoted 
to the honor and glory of the Company's troops. 
I may say that I have become as much identified 
with the Armies of the three Presidencies as if I 

h 2 



242 



had risen from their ranks : I have jealously guard- 
ed their honor, and I have fought at their head ! 

I now leave them for ever : but in the retirement 
of private life, although no longer able to serve 
them, the destinies of the Indian Armies will ever 
occupy my thoughts. 

I here take leave of them, hoping that this order 
will be of use, as the last which I can issue to the 
Armies of India !* 



* Sir William Gomm, who succeeded to the Indian command on the 
retirement of Sir Charles Napier, with reference to this address, issued 
the following General Order : — 

Adjutant General's Office, Camp Gorounda, 4tk January 1851. — The 
Commander in Chief feels that he cannot confer a more substantial bene- 
fit at this moment, upon the collective Armies of India — especially upon 
that portion of them which must always comprise a most important and 
interesting branch of the United Service ! — the body of its junior Officers, 
— than by holding up to their enduring and perpetually respected remem- 
brance, the valuable counsel tendered to the Army at large in the parting 
General Order of his predecessor in the command, dated the 15th instant. 

The Commander in Chief is well aware that advice tendered so ear- 
nestly and so forcibly, and with such manifest solicitude for the welfare 
of all, especially of those to whom it is pointedly addressed, could not 
fail to command for itself a more than ordinary share of attention and 
subscription, independent of any effort of his own to enforce the efficacy 
of the appeal: — but he is anxious not to leave unattempted any means 
that can by possibility avail for averting the mischief that may be im- 
pending in some quarters, or for timely arresting, even in one individual 
instance, the progress towards courses so distressing in their consequences, 
to those whose duty it is to adjudge the award, while calamitous in the 




243 



[The above address was, on the date of its promulgation 
in G. O., 15th December, followed up by the subjoined 
Circular from the Adjutant General, not published in General 
Orders.] 

No. 2693, Adjutant General's Office, Simla, 15th De- 
cember, 1850: — 

" Sir, — With reference to General Orders by the Com- 
mander in Chief of this date, I am directed by His Excel- 
lency to request you will have the goodness to bring to my 
notice for the information of his successor, General Sir W. 
Gomm, K. C. B., any cases which may be brought before 
the European Courts of Requests in the division under your 
command, which may in your judgment be indicative of 
laxity of conduct, or of an absence of a proper integrity of 
principle on the part of those concerned in view to the 
same being known and recorded in this department; it 
being obviously highly desirable that the few Officers, whose 
looseness in regard to their pecuniary affairs and engage- 
ments tends to bring discredit on the service to which they be- 
long, should be debarred from partaking of those rewards of 
staff and detached employ, which ought only to be bestowed 
upon such as pursue a very opposite line of conduct. 

" I am further, by His Excellency's desire, to request, 
that any cases of high play, or gaming, which may come 

extreme to those at whom the judgment of necessity strikes, all so vividly 
and instructively set forth in the General Order now adverted to ; de- 
monstrative also of the only course open to those in authority, from the 
Commander in Chief down to Officers in Eegimental and even in lower 
command, unflinchingly to hold by if they would support the fair fame of 
the Army in Peace as well as in War, and of the general respectability of 
the Military Society in India. 

(Signed) "W. Gomm, General. 

Head Quarters, Fort William,} 
27th December 1850. J 



244 



under your observation, may be also reported to me; and 
I am commanded to impress upon you the necessity for 
checking to the utmost extent in your power, an indul- 
gence in these most pernicious and debasing practices, 
fraught as they invariably are. with embarrassment and 
pecuniary difficulties resulting too frequently in dishonor- 
able and evasive endeavours to escape from their evil 
effects, instances of which have only very lately been 
brought to Sir Charles Napier's knowledge. 

" I am permitted to add, that in my capacity of Adju- 
tant General of this Army, it will be my duty, and a duty 
I will sedulously attend to without respect of persons, to 
bring to the marked notice of the Commander in Chief 
all reports which may be made to me of misbehaviour of 
Officers of the above description, to ensure to the utmost 
degree practicable that zealous and watchful rectitude of 
act and honorable bearing on the part of Officers of this 
Presidency, the absence of which, in some instances, so 
greatly tends to lower and depreciate the European cha- 
racter in India. 

" In conclusion, I am ordered to instruct you to publish 
this despatch in your division or district orders, for the due 
information and guidance of all whom its contents may 
concern. 

(Signed) H. T. Tucker, 

Adjutant General of the Army." 



APPENDIX. 



Appointment of Sie Chakles Napiee to 
succeed Lord Gough. 



In the height of that paroxysm of alarm and distrust which was 
excited in England hy the news of Lord Gough's dearly-won and 
indecisive " victories" over the Sikhs on the Chenaub and the Jhelum, 
Sir Charles James Napier, the Conqueror of Scinde, was, in com- 
pliance with the almost general demand of people, parliament and press, 
sent out to take the place of a Commander who was supposed to 
have emperilled the British Indian Empire and the honor of the 
nation. A month before intelligence of Chillianwallah was received, 
" the leading journal" had brought forward " the one name which 
would suggest itself to the thoughts of every person as almost alone 
fulfilling the rare conditions demanded of high military skill, great 
local knowledge and untiring zeal." On the 6th March, the Prime 
Minister, Lord John Russell, announced in the House of Commons that 
the Government had considered it necessary to advise Her Majesty to 
appoint Sir Charles Napier to the chief command in India, and — amid 
loud cheering from all parts of the house, — that Her Majesty was gra- 
ciously pleased to approve of that advice, and that Sir Charles 
Napier was ready to obey Her Majesty's command and to proceed 
to India forthwith. On the 7th, the Court of Directors met, with 



11 



APPENDIX. 



eager crowds about its doors, to consider this appointment. Of 
course it confirmed the choice of the sovereign and the nation, but 
not, as was said, without some discussion, for it loved not and had no 
reason to love the object of that choice. On the 17th, Sir Charles 
took the oaths at the India House, and was that same evening enter- 
tained by the Court at the London Tavern. On the 24th March he 
started for India, overland, travelling rapidly across the Continent ; 
and on Sunday the 6th May 1849, he landed at Calcutta, to find 
the Punjaub made a British Province, and all India in the dullness of 
a profound peace. Goojerat had been fought before he left England, 
and precisely one month after the day of his departure, the East India 
Company in its Court of Proprietors met to echo the thanks of Parlia- 
ment voted to Lord Gough " for the conspicuous gallantry he had 
displayed during the operations in the Punjaub, and especially for his 
conduct on the 21st February in the battle of Goojerat when the 
British Army obtained a brilliant and decisive victory." — Compiler. 

Arrival at Calcutta. 

We have not yet heard where and with what ceremonies the 
landing of Sir Charles Napier was effected yesterday, but we know 
that the warning guns were fired at about half an hour after noon, 
that the Fort roared a salute about a quarter to four, and that a few 
minutes before that hour the old hero was ushered into Government 
House by a sprinkling of staff and three or four gentlemen in plain 
clothes whom duty or curiosity had nerved to a defiance of the 
impending shower. Sir Charles was brought up from the ghaut 
in a carriage of very modest character, and was received altogether 
with as little of ceremony and display as even he could reasonably 
desire. Of the crowds who would, under more favorable circum- 
stances, have awaited his landing, many perhaps were kept at home 
by the sanctity of the day, more by the threatening state of the » 
weather — the advent of Shaitan ka Bhaee being appropriately 
heralded by whirlwind and storm — while still more, we believe, 
were misled by a supposition that the debarkation would not take 
place till the evening. 



APPENDIX. 



iii 



The detachment of Native Infantry on duty at Government House 
was drawn up as a guard of honor to receive the new Commander 
in Chief, and Sir Charles's first act on alighting from the carriage 
was to address himself to the Subadar in command, with whom he 
conversed for a minute or two. A friend who was present describes 
the distinguished veteran as looking more hale and stout than many 
would expect to see him. 

Since the above was written we have received our Reporter's account 
of the landing, and give it in the usual place. — Bengal Hurkaru, 
May 7, 1849. 

The Bentinck was semaphored at 6 A. m. yesterday. Her 
arrival was not generally known until noon, however, when three 
signal guns were fired from the Fort, which set people on the qui 
vive to see the conquering hero of Scinde, and the new Commander 
in Chief of India. A group of Military Officers and Civilians 
presently assembled at Baboo's Ghaut to see the sight ; but it was 
long before Sir Charles came up. The steamer anchored off Garden 
Reach at about 1 p. M.; when Sir John Hunter Littler, Sir James 
William Colvile, and several others went down in the Soonamookee, 
which was towed by a river steamer, to welcome the great man, and 
bring him to the ghaut where he should land. The state-boat 
returned at about 4 P. M. with Sir Charles, who immediately land- 
ed, under the usual salute, and proceeded to Government House, in 
company with Sir John Littler and his suit. The troops in the Fort 
were, of course, in attendance, being ranged along the Chaundpaul 
Ghaut ; and received their future Chief with presented arms. We 
presume Sir Charles will be sworn in an Extraordinary Member of 
Council to-day. — Ibid. 

Speech to Her Majesty's 96th, in Foet 
William. 

A friend has favored us with the following highly interesting 
account of Sir Charles Napier's first appearance in public as Com- 
mander in Chief, and with a spirited and doubtless sufficiently cor- 



iv 



APPENDIX. 



rect report of His Excellency's speech to the men of H. M. 96th 
Regiment : — 

" The lately arrived 96th Regiment were reviewed in the Fort at 
daylight yesterday morning (11th May) by Sir Charles Napier. 
So quietly had the appointment been made that scarcely half a dozen 
spectators, besides military men, were present. Sir Charles, punctual 
to a proverb, reached the parade, accompanied by the Town Major, 
before a single Officer of the Regiment had made his appearance, and 
finding no other amusement walked into the barracks. He soon re- 
turned however, and subjected the Regiment to a minute inspection, 
after which it marched past in slow, and again in quick time, and 
then advanced in line. At the close Sir Charles Napier addressed 
the men in a characteristic speech. After alluding to his former con- 
nection with the Regiment he said — 

' I am very glad to meet the 96th again. We have both been 
a good deal about the world since we were last together, and I am 
very glad to hear such a good account of the Regiment. Your 
Colonel tells me that you are not only in good health, but that you 
are good in conduct — that you have very few men in hospital. Now, 
this is all right, and I hope you will continue to bear a good charac- 
ter. But let me give you a bit of advice — that is, dont drink. I 
know young men dont think much about advice from old men. 
They put their tongue in their cheek and think they know a good 
deal better than the old cove that's giving them advice. But let me 
tell you, that you've come to a country where, if you drink, you're 
dead men. If you be sober and steady, you'll get on well. 
But if you drink, you're done for. You will either be invalided 
or die. I know two Regiments in this country, — one drank ; 
the other didn't drink. The one that didn't drink is one of the 
finest Regiments, and has got on as well as any Regiment in exist- 
ence. The one that did drink has been all but destroyed. For any 
Regiment for which I have a respect, and there is not one of the 
British Regiments whom I don't respect, I should always try and 
persuade them to keep from drinking. I know there are some men 
who will drink in spite of the devil and their Officers — but such men 



APPENDIX. 



V 



will soon be in hospital and very few that go in, in this country, 
ever come out again. I wish the 96th Regiment every success, and 
am very glad to see it in the state it is.' 

After expressing to Major Cumberlege his great gratification, he 
called the Serjeant Major of the Regiment, with whom he had a few 
minutes' confidential chat. He then dismissed the Regiment, and 
proceeded to an inspection of the arsenal. 

To our non-military apprehension, the 96th is justly deserving of 
the high encomiums passed upon it by Sir Charles Napier. Every 
movement was made with the greatest steadiness and precision ; and 
the men have a fine healthy appearance, but which, alas, they will 
speedily lose in this climate. The Regiment has also a superior 
band, and we trust that the Officers will allow the inhabitants of 
Calcutta to judge of its merits, by permitting it to perform on the 
Esplanade on certain appointed evenings. How many hundreds re- 
member the pleasing break in the monotony of their evening drive 
occasioned by the sweet sounds of the excellent band of the 62nd. 
We trust the 96th will establish an equal claim to immortality in 
the hearts of all the fair vesper visitants of the Course. — Ibid, 
May 12, 1849. 

Review at Barrackpore. 

The Review at Barrackpore will give the Indian Army a fore- 
taste of what it has to expect in its new Commander in Chief. His 
Excellency on arriving at the Parade — dressed d la Napier — i. e. 
eccentrically, with solah hat and Blucher boots, dashed at full 
gallop to the troops, dispensed with marching past in review and 
took them at once — open column, right in front, — to the burial 
ground vicinity, where he wheeled them into fine, and gave the order 
to advance, allowing the commandants of corps to conduct them past 
the tanks and the congee house — as best they might. He then 
marched them back to the grand parade, expressed his unqualified 
gratification in a characteristic speech, remarked that the Officers did 
not cover while marching, and dismissed the Regiments to their lines. 

b 



vi 



A P P E N D I X, 



His Excellency addressed the 35th separately, telling Colonel 
Grey it was an honor to command so distinguished a corps ; con- 
versed with a Subadar covered with medals, tapped him familiarly 
on the shoulder, and personally accompanying the Regiment to the 
lines, declared that he regarded it as the most distinguished corps 
in the service ; that he was proud to command an army possessing 
such a gallant body. — Indian Times, May 16, 1849. 

Dinner at the Military Club, Calcutta. 

The Members of the Military Club, resident In Calcutta and its 
vicinity, invited Sir Charles Napier to Dinner for the 17th, and the 
entertainment came off accordingly that evening. 

The arrangements were complete, as you will perceive, if you will 
only take the trouble of glancing your eye over one of the Bills of 
Fare, which I quietly abstracted at a late hour of the evening, and 
put into my pocket to send to you. The accommodation at the new 
Club House is so limited that two rooms were laid out on the oc- 
casion. Sir Charles and the big wigs in what's called the " long 
room" ; the little fry, in the centre room. Col. Handscomb, as Pre- 
sident of the Committee, did the honors. Sir Charles arrived about 
10 minutes to 8. When I saw the jockey cap coming out of the 
carriage, I fully expected the tails of the " Blue Frock" to follow, 
but I was glad to find it otherwise, if only for Sir John Littler's sake, 
who was there in full uniform. What is it that makes Sir Charles 
so partial to that funny looking cap of his ! He is as bad as Daniel 
Wilson, who can't stir anywhere without his three cornered affair. 
I heard Sir Charles say in the anteroom — " I hear there was an 
Editor of a newspaper at the Review the other day, I care little what 
they write about me ; I don't intend to take in any papers during the 
short time I shall stay in India, so they may write what they like." 
After dinner, and after the usual toast of the Queen had been dis- 
posed of, Col. Handscomb rose to propose the toast of the evening, 
as follows : — 

" Gentlemen, I rise to propose the health of our distinguished 
guest, Sir Charles Napier, who has honored us with his presence 



APPENDIX. 



vii 



this evening. I hope I shall escape the disgusting charge of adula- 
tion, although in alluding to Sir Charles Napier's distinguished 
career it will be impossible to speak in any measured terms, or avoid 
the use of phrases which better become the sycophant than the sol- 
dier. It would have been as unbecoming in us, as it is difficult, not to 
do honor to a Chief who has been sent to us as Sir Charles Napier 
has been — his nomination clamoured for, and his advent heralded by 
the unanimous voice of England's sons. The just fame he acquired 
in Scinde is a true earnest of what he will accomplish here, and in 
proposing the health of such a man in such an assembly, where I am 
probably the least fitted to do justice to my theme, I nevertheless 
feel confident that you will all heartily respond to my call. Gentle- 
men, the health of Sir Charles Napier with all the honors. 

Tune — " There you go with your eye out." 

What funny fellows Band boys are ; always doing something ridi- 
culous. Sir Charles rose to return thanks, and made himself heard 
throughout the room. " Gentlemen, I thank you for the honor 
you have done me in drinking my health — I thank you still more 
for the cordial manner in which you have done it — and I thank your 
President for the kind and handsome way in which he introduced my 
name. It is with no ordinary feelings of pleasure that I now return 
to India, proud of the position which I hold among you. I owe 
much to the Army of India, both Queen's and Company's, and now 
that I am at its head, I will endeavour to pay back that debt of obli- 
gation. I will endeavour to acquit myself, without partiality, favor, 
or affection. I will endeavour to do justice to all, and I will maintain 
that discipline in the Army of India which, aided by the gallantry of 
the soldiers, will ever lead us on from victory to victory, and point 
out to the whole world that we are the Paramount Power in India, 
and that those glorious sepoys who have so often fought side by 
side with their European Officers, striving with them even unto their 
death, are invincible. I feel proud whenever I see the Native soldier 
bearing the same medals on his breast which I wear, though his are 
perhaps better deserved, and I feel a double pleasure in the knowledge 
that such decorations excite the emulation and raise the confidence 



viii 



A 1' P E N D I X. 



of the sepoy. Before sitting down, Gentlemen, you must allow me 
to propose a toast. The name I am going to mention is one which, 
I suspect, will be received with enthusiasm. He is one who is an 
honor to this country, and an honor to his own. He is one who has 
ever been the Soldier's friend, and ever will be — one whose career as 
a statesman is remarkable, need I mention the name of " -E7/ew6ro.' " 
(Deafening, maddening, terrific, frightful cheers ; which were res- 
ponded to by all the jackals in the neighbourhood. A wag near 
me would have it that it was not the jackals at all, but the young 
Civilians at the Bengal Club, unconscious that they were doing 
honor to one who never was a friend to the Civil Service.) 

" Ah ! I thought as much," continued Sir Charles, his eyes 
dancing through his specs. " Indeed I was certain it would be so. 
1 kneiv that the name of Ellenbro,' pronounced in an assembly like 
this, would elicit the cheers which I have just heard. I could go 
on talking on this subject all night, and even then would fail to 
convey to you the state of my feelings on the occasion. The health 
of Lord Ellenborough with nine times nine." After this the 
healths of Lord Gough, Sir John Littler, and the Navy were pro- 
posed. In returning thanks Capt. Johnston made a very happy hit ; 
he said " we can also boast of our hero of the same name and distin- 
guished family." Capt. Champneys also rose and proposed his 
favorite toast, " The Duke," in the same eloquent strain in which 
we have been wont to hear him deliver himself on similar occasions. 
Sir Charles and the Big Wigs retired about ten. — Englishman, 
May 21, 1849. 

Letter to Sergeant Bennet. 

We subjoin the following letter from the Commander in Chief of 
India to Color Sergeant Bennet on his having been the first to mount 
the breach at Mooltan. It was one great secret of the popularity and 
success of Napoleon Bonaparte, that no one was too humble to 
escape his notice, — and in this Sir C. Napier has throughout his 
career resembled the greatest soldier the Continent of Europe ever 



APPENDIX. 



ix 



beheld. Sir Charles has made two trifling mistakes : Mr. Bennet 
was Color Sergeant, not Sergeant Major — it was the breach at Se- 
ringapatam, not Ahmedabad, Sergeant Graham was the first to 
mount, — though we believe it was a Sergeant of the " Old Toughs" 
who planted the Colors on the walls of Ahmedabad : — 

" Calcutta, 20th May, 1849. 

" Sergeant Major Bennet. 

" When in 1847 I presented the Fusiliers with their new Colors, 
I said that the men of our days were as good as those of former days, 
I was right ; and Mooltan has proved every word ! In former times 
Sergeant Major Graham (if my memory serves me correctly) of the 
1st Europeans, planted the old Colors on the breach of Ahmedabad. 
He did a gallant action, and when you planted the British Standard 
on the breach of Mooltan, your deed was as brave as his, and as 
renowned ! 

" The Officers, non-commissioned Officers, and Privates of the 
first Europeans, in both Presidencies, have sustained, and even, if 
possible, surpassed by their valor in the present days, the glories of 
the past. 

" Tell your comrades that I rejoiced when I heard of the fame 
which you have all gained for those new Colors that I had the honor 
of presenting to the Regiment in Scinde. — I remain, your sincere 
well-wisher, 

c< C. J. Napier, Commander in Chief. 

"P. S. — I should have written to you long since, but delayed it 
till my arrival in India." 

The coincidence is striking enough assuredly — but Sir C. Napier 
seems only aware of one-half of it. Major Mignon, who led the 
Fusiliers up the breach at Mooltan, is the son of Colonel Mignon, 
who, exactly half a century ago, led the flank companies of the Bom- 
bay Army at the storming of Seringapatam ! — Bombay Times, 
August -16, 1849. 



X 



APPENDIX. 



Departure from Calcutta for the North- West. 

Sir Charles Napier left Calcutta yesterday, under the usual 
salute, at 1^ p. m., in his eternal solah hat, a tusser coat, and a pair 
of white unmentionables which appeared to have already done their 
duty on the previous day ; while betwixt his finger and his thumb 
he held a nosegay whose freshness had gone and fragrance had 
flown, but which nevertheless, he ever and anon gave to his nose, 
and took 't away again. He arrived at the Chandpaul Ghaut with 
the Deputy Governor (who was in full uniform) and suit. A few 
Military Officers came with the cortege also, and, so far as we could 
observe, one civil servant. Upon reaching the ghaut, Sir Charles 
took a cordial leave of Sir John Littler, and stepped into the Soona- 
mookee, — rejecting the assistance of one of the dandees who officious- 
ly put out his hand to raise the Commander in Chief into the boat. 
The Aids-de-Camp of His Excellency, and our Deputy Post 
Master, entered the boat with him, and the party lost no time 
in unmooring and setting out for Chinsurah, whence Sir Charles 
and his suit are to complete the remainder of their journey by 
dawk. 

The Military Secretary of His Excellency followed in a separate 
boat, dressed as negligently as Sir Charles, and with a more fantas- 
tic head-dress ; for it bore the shape of an ordinary hat on an 
enormous scale, (Sir Charles's is cut after the jockey fashion) and 
something that looked for all the world like a bathing towel pared 
of its original dimensions, was placed over it so that the borders in 
front overhung the wearer's face like a nun's veil, and kept flapping, 
flapping against his eyes continually ; and so much did this extraordi- 
nary headpiece disturb the use of his visual organs that he stumbled 
fearfully in mounting the prow of his boat, and might have suffered 
severely from a bad fall at least, but for the timely aid of one of the 
boatmen, who lent him a helping hand, and safely brought him into 
the boat. 

One of the papers stated, on the occasion of Sir Charles's arrival 
here, that he was looking much better than it had been expected he 
would. If this was so, Sir Charles must have suffered not a little 



APPENDIX. 



XI 



in health during his brief sojourn, for he appeared very pale and 
haggard yesterday. — Bengal Hurkaru, May 23, 1849. 

Speech to the Free Masons at Simla. 

The Free Masons at Simla entertained Sir Charles Napier in 
the Assembly Rooms on the 1st October 1849. On his health 
being drunk, with deafening cheers, he rose and spoke nearly as 
follows : — 

" Worshipful Master and Gentlemen ! I return my cordial thanks 
for the honor you have done me. I should not myself have been 
inclined to admit that I merit the compliments paid me ; but intro- 
duced as they have been by Colonel Curtis, and acknowledged in 
the manner you have been pleased to receive them, I suppose I 
must believe that I am in some measure deserving of them. 
(Cheers). Few Masons can say that they owe so much to Masonry 
as I do. I am an old, and I fear — a good-for-nothing Mason. I 
have been forty years a Royal Arch Mason, and yet — I fear — I 
could not work myself into a Chapter of that high degree : but with 
the aid of my friend Colonel Curtis I hope to rub off the rust, and be 
able to do so — for — as I said before— probably no man present can 
say that he is under the same obligation to Masonry that I am, and 
I am always glad of an opportunity of acknowledging the same to 
the Craft. 

" I was once a prisoner, without a hope of being even exchanged, 
and expected to be sent to Verdun, to which fortress in France all 
prisoners were consigned ; for at this time the two Governments of 
France and England were so exasperated against each other, that 
their anger fell on individuals, and there was no exchange of prison- 
ers. A man who was taken, lost all chance of promotion or even 
of seeing his friends again. In this state of despair and misery — 
knowing that my family must have believed me to have been killed, 
I was casting about in my own thoughts for some way in which I 
could communicate with my family. It came into my head that I was 
a Mason, and I contrived to poke out a Brother. He was a French 
Officer of the name of ' Bontemps,' I think, and a very good name 



xii 



APPENDIX. 



it was — for like a good and honorable Brother he managed to send 
a letter for me to England — by no means an easy matter in those 
days ; for there were no railroads, or steam engines then, to carry 
letters like lightning every where, besides, it was at this time an 
extremely dangerous and hazardous undertaking for a French 
Officer — but my honest and good Brother did it for me, and within 
three months my family knew that I was alive. I have acknow- 
ledged to being but a bad Mason, but I will not add to this by 
being a bad companion, and inflicting a long speech on you. I shall 
therefore only again thank you, and wish all your healths." — 
Mofussilite, October 11, 1849. 

At Delhi. 

Sir Charles Napier arrived at this station on the 30th ultimo. A 
guard of honor, suited to His Excellency's exalted rank, was in at- 
tendance, and every thing arranged in order to do honor to the dis- 
tinguished visitor. The gallant Officer however despised such 
" pomps and vanities," and sent the guard of honor to the " right 
about," like a second Bombastes " Begone brave army, don't kick 
up a row." After inspecting the troops and presenting colours to 
the 41st N. I., Sir Charles departed for Agra, no doubt very much 
disgusted at having been treated with marked civility and attention. 
What the native opinion of these eccentricities may be we will not 
venture to enquire, nor do we suppose Sir Charles cares two straws 
about it, but, in a country where the observance of pomp and 
splendour is looked upon as indispensable on all state occasions, and 
where a man of rank is best known by the magnificence of his train, 
we should consider the observance of a little form as not only pru- 
dent but necessary. It would ensure more respect, and that at but 
small expense to the State. — Delhi Gazette, November 7, 1849. 

We repeat again, we wish that mail would come in, that we might 
have some of the " dulce" as well as the " utile" for our readers. In 
lieu of graver matter therefore, we must relate a few current anecdotes 
we have heard of Sir Charles Napier whilst at Delhi. Sir Charles 



APPENDIX. 



xiii 



appears to have been in great spirits and won the hearts of every one 
by his urbanity and kind manner ; while at the station he clung firmly 
to his bit of soap and one towel principle ; he kept his resolution of 
rejecting all invitations to take his luxurious ease in private houses, 
and remained at the Dak Bungalow. The attention of the staff was 
called to the necessity of putting their Pittarahs and property carefully 
in the Bungalow, as thieves abounded and seeing the apparent care- 
lessness of the party would be on the alert. " My dear sir," was the 
reply, " we are quite safe, we have nothing." The attention Sir 
Charles paid to all matters in the Magazine was what all expected 
from him, he got into every hole aud corner and begrimed himself to 
his heart's content. When a chilumchee of water sans soap was pro- 
vided " Have you no soap ?" Sir Charles asked of the Officiating 
Commissary. " No, I am sorry to say I have not, there is none here 
but Company's soap, and I am sure your Excellency would not 
take that." " Oh ?" and Sir Charles looked through his spectacles 
till his eyes twinkled again as he said — " Let's have the Company's 
soap." Our Officiating Commissary is but young in the service, but 
his activity and intelligence appear to have struck Sir Charles. 
" Are you forty years of age, Sir ?" he said " No your Excellency, 
no not quite." " Why man," said Sir Charles, " you talk as if you 
were seventy !" — Ibid. 

Presentation of Coloes to the 41st N. I. 
at Delhi. 

The Commander in Chief inspected the Magazine (at Delhi) on 
Wednesday, and visited the palace the same day. On Thursday 
morning the troops were out in Brigade order on the race course, and 
made a very respectable shew as to numbers, appearance, &c. A little 
after sunrise Sir Charles Napier arrived on the ground, accompanied 
by only one of his suite, and was received with the customary 'salute. 
He rode rapidly down the whole line, and taking his post in the 
centre, asked what was to be done, as a regular review would break too 
far into the day, adding something about the chance of being broiled, 
and that he should like to go through the ceremonv of presenting the 

c 



xiv 



A P P E N D I X. 



colors to the 41st N. I. as soon as possible. The Brigade was 
accordingly marched once round, and then drawn up in close columns 
of Regiments on three sides of a square near the race stand, the 41st 
in the centre. The new colors having been brought to the right 
front of the corps by two Havildars, supported by two Native 
Officers, — the Commander in Chief addressed the Regiment in nearly 
the following words : — 

Forty-first — It is a great honor and a great pleasure to present 
colors to this brave Regiment. I last evening read your 
accounts of service, and without entering into all the details, 
I will observe that you are distinguished, among many other 
things, by three circumstances that must be a source of pride to 
you as soldiers — First, you are distinguished as the first British 
Regiment that ever entered the Punjaub, and you entered it under 
that brave soldier, Lord Lake. You next distinguished yourselves 
at Bhurtpore under Lord Combermere, and my able, brave and 
valued friend George Hunter. And thirdly, you have been greatly 
distinguished at Sobraon under another leader, the third on whose 
brow you have helped to place the glorious Coronet of a British 
Peer. I mean that noble old soldier, Lord Gough, who is now on 
his way home, covered with laurels. Take your colors, and long 
may you bear these colors, decorated as they are by your valour, 
and if war again breaks out, again those colors will be distinguished 
with honor. I have long considered the British Sepoy as the best 
soldier in the world except the British ; — brave, sober and obedient ; 
and among them none have been more distinguished than those of 
the 41st Regiment. And here I must pay a just compliment to the 
valour of the European Officers, and to Major Halford who led you 
in the battle of Sobraon. In that action eight European Officers 
fell on the field, either killed or wounded. A vast number, when 
we consider how few are allowed to each Native Regiment. 

Major Halford replied as follows : — Permit me to express to your 
Excellency on behalf of the 41st Regiment N. I., our high sense of 
the distinction you have been pleased to confer on the Corps, by a 
presentation of these colors, and for the allusion to its past services, 



APPENDIX. 



xv 



a distinction we may well be proud of, for it will prove an additional 
incentive, and a guarantee to our bearing them with honor, whereso- 
ever we may be destined, in the course of future service. 

Brigadier Palmer, commanding the station, was then informed, — 
with an aside that the Ladies present might be angry if he did not 
indulge them, — that he might put the Brigade through some evo- 
lutions, adding that if the Officers kept their proper distance, it was 
all he cared for. A few manoeuvres were gone through with ap- 
parent precision. After the inspection, the Commander in Chief 
ordered Field Officers to the front and said that he was much pleased 
with all he had seen — that he was very particular about distances 
and correct covering on which materially depends the correct execu- 
tion of all movements of large bodies of troops, and that care was 
always necessary to prevent soldiers firing too high. His Ex- 
cellency then added that he would take this opportunity of expressing 
the satisfaction he had derived in observing the good appearance and 
steadiness of the troops, which was very creditable to Regiments. 
The Brigade was ordered to the lines at about eight, the heat of the 
sun bearing evidence that the chance of a broiling was by no means 
problematical had they stood out much later. His Excellency 
quitted Delhi for Agra on Tuesday evening. 

The old colors of the 41st are to be put up in St. James' 
Church.— Delhi Gazette, Nov. 3, 1849. 

At Agra. 

The Commander in Chief having signified his intention of review- 
ing the Brigade, the necessary arrangements were made and orders 
issued. On Tuesday morning the troops consisting of one company 
of Artillery, Left Wing 1st Fusiliers, 54th and 63rd Regiments of 
Native Infantry, and the Regiment of Ferozepore, were drawn up 
on the Grand Parade in line — senior Regiment on the right of 
Infantry. At about a quarter of an hour before sunrise Sir Charles 
Napier arrived accompanied by his own and the Lieutenant Gover- 
nor's staff. After the usual salute from the Artillery and Infantry, 
the Troops passed in review in slow time. Sir Charles seemed to 



XVI 



APPENDIX. 



take a particular interest in the Sikh Regiment for he called its 
Commanding Officer Captain Tebbs beside him while it was march- 
ing past, and asked him several questions respecting their good 
conduct, numbers, &c. After the troops had returned to their 
original ground they were wheeled into line. The Battalions then 
advanced in open column from the right, and having gone about 150 
yards were again deployed into line on the leading companies of 
the respective Regiments. Platoon firing from right to left and tile 
firing. The Brigade then retired by Battalions from the right and 
formed square on the two centre subdivisions of their respective Re- 
giments — firing by faces and file firing. Regiments formed into 
quarter distance column and the Brigade deployed into line on the 
54th N. I., at the same time changing position by throwing forward 
the right and back the left of the Brigade ; — more firing. The 
Commander in Chief then called the Commanding Officers to the 
front and addressed them as follows : — " I have called you in order 
to express my extreme satisfaction with the manner in which the 
troops have gone through the several evolutions ; I know that pre- 
concerted manoeuvres always go off swimmingly, and I therefore 
purposely gave you one which you could not be prepared for, and I 
am highly satisfied with the result. Every movement was executed 
well and steadily, and I request that you will make my sentiments 
known to the officers, non-commissioned officers, and men of your 
respective Regiments." The Commander in Chief then told them 
to take their Regiments to their Quarters. As the Fusiliers were 
marching to their barracks Sir Charles rode up to them, and after 
desiring the fifes and drums to cease playing said — " Men of the 
Fusiliers, I am glad to have this opportunity of making your 
acquaintance, for I know you to be as fine a Regiment as any in the 
world. 1 know the 2nd European Regiment well, and I like them 
much. I have ordered you up to Lahore, and if there is any dust 
to be kicked up there, why you shall be in it." He rode with tl 
Regiment to their barracks, inspected the latter as also the Hospital 
He tasted the bread served to the soldiers, and abused the Commis 
sariat contractors. He said he would like to hang every contractor 



APPENDIX. 



xvii 



in India. He then bid good morning to the Officers accompanying 
him, and apologized for having kept them in full dress so long, 
saying, it was all their own faults as he did not wish them to stav. 
Sir Charles then got into the carriage of the Lieut. Governor and 
drove home to breakfast. The impression that the Commander in 
Chief (so often accused of harsh brusquerie), has left on military 
men at Agra is very favourable. If he was well pleased with them 
they were equally well pleased with him. — Agra Messenger, 
November 10, 1849. 

The last week has been one of unusual excitement, owing to the 
advent of Sir Charles Napier, but his stay was short, and his 
movement so eccentric and meteor-like that he has left but a faint 
impression, which will soon fade. The best story extant regarding 
his sojourn, is one that he related himself at the Lieutenant- 
Governor's table, when talking of his want of proper power as 
Commander in Chief of the Forces of India. Addressing the circle 
at large he said — " I shall leave you shortly — I can't say ; I am 
thwarted in every way by the Military Board. What authority has 
a Commander in Chief in India ? None. Who have, who pos- 
sess, the authority ? The Military Board ! I was dining with the 
Governor General at Simla the other day, when I said to him, 
" My Lord, it's no use ; I might as well resign my authority at 
once as go on on the present system. The whole authority is engross- 
ed by the Military Board." His Lordship replied — " Not at all Sir 
Charles, in all things your authority would be respected and 
appealed to." When I replied — " You are mistaken : the only 
people I have any authority over in all India are the Apothecaries, 
and I could not give a dose of medicine to one of them without first 
obtaining leave of the Military Board to expend a certain quantity of 
their d — d Medical Stores." You may imagine the grin that per- 
vaded his audience, as they listened to such emphatic language from 
the lips of a Commander in Chief. — Bombay Times, Nov. 17, 
1849. 



XVUl 



A P P E X D I X. 



Sir Charles Napier and the 14th Dragoons. 

Sir Charles Napier reviewed the 14th Dragoons on the old race 
course (Lahore) at 7 A. M., on the morning of the 17th instant. 
After he had seen them perform the different evolutions usual on 
such occasions he had the Regiment drawn up and thus addressed 
them : " Fourteenth Dragoons — I have known you since I was a 
boy. I knew you also in the Peninsula when your gallantry was 
spoken of by every one, and I there witnessed many of your 
glorious charges, and it was only a few years ago that I knew you 
again in Poona, since which time you have lost nothing in disci- 
pline, nothing in glory, nothing in fame, nothing in fame I repeat. 
I care not for idle stories. There is not a finer Regiment in the 
world than the 14th Dragoons, and no Regiment would I be 
prouder to lead into action against any enemy." 

" Your Colonel mentioned to me that you were young and that 
the Dragoon swords were not as sharp as the Sikhs. I differ from 
your Colonel and think you fine broad shouldered fellows, and I hope 
I may have an opportunity of seeing the strength of your arms and 
the sharpness of your swords tried, for I well know, men, that you 
only require leading. Colonel King, I am highly pleased with the 
appearance of your Regiment. — Mofussilite, Dec. 27, 1849. 

About six months subsequent to the occasion here recorded, 
Colonel King committed suicide, and in a letter to Sir Charles 
Napier, which he wrote just before he destroyed himself, he attribut- 
ed his self-destruct ; on to the effect which the speech above reported, 
had on the minds and conduct of his men. This sad matter is 
discussed in the following epistle addressed to The Times, by General 
William Napier, who endeavours, with what success let the reader 
judge, to trace the origin and tone of the letter to the assumed insi- 
nuity of the writer. — Compiler. 

" Sm, — Sir Charles Napier's observations upon the Court-martial 
which, it is said, caused the melancholy death of Colonel King, of 
the 14th Dragoons, need neither apology nor illustration ; but the 
shameless efforts of writers, evidently tools of more powerful persons, 
to abuse the public mind as to his speech, made six months before, 



APPENDIX. 



when inspecting that Regiment, shall be exposed in all their malig- 
nant relief. ' The 14th Dragoons would go any where if properly- 
led.' These are the words put into Sir C. Napier's mouth — but 
they never came out of it; and, if they had, would not of necessity 
imply more than that some officer had failed in judgment, unless 
something known or surmised had given them force and point. 
However, Sir C, Napier never uttered them ;• they are the invention 
of calumniators, who, in their eagerness to lower him in public esti- 
mation, do not hesitate thus to forge insults against the unhappy 
officer they pretend to defend and bewail. Some of the writers have 
spoken also of a last letter to the Commander in Chief, predicting 
that it will be suppressed. It is as follows : — 

' Sir, — You asked me the weight of men mounted on the 16th of 
December, 1849. I answered 17 stones 5 lbs. You said, ' That 
is 3 stone lighter than at home,' which I accounted for by saying the 
men were young, and tall men were not sent out from England to 
India. When you asked about the swords, I said we could not keep 
them so sharp as the natives, who use leather scabbards. Was it 
judicious in you to repeat my words before the men, perverting their 
meaning ? You bore testimony to the discipline of the Regiment that 
day under my command. Your remarks before the Regiment sowed 
the seeds of discontent, which have ripened into mutiny. You are 
the cause of the stripes and punishment which that mutiny has led to, 
and distraction and death to one who once had friends, now disgrace 
and misery to those friends. I have not been an accountable being 
for this last month. 

J. W. King.' 

This letter, the result of insanity, as I shall presently show, would 
have been thus replied to, if the writer had been living when 
it was received : — When a general-in-chief is publicly told by a com- 
manding officer, in the hearing of his men, against whom a cry had 
gone forth for misbehaviour in action, that they were very small men, 
and not strong — that their swords would not take so sharp an edge as 
their enemy's swords, and were so heavy, the men could not use them 
— for these were the real expressions used — when such language was 



XX 



A P P E NDIXi 



employed at such a time, it was not only judicious but necessary that 
Sir C. Napier should address the Regiment as follows : — ' Soldiers, 
the Colonel says you are small men, and your swords are too heavy 
for you, and not so sharp as the Sikhs' swords. I beg the Colonel's 
pardon. I see before me men with big hearts, and broad shoulders, 
and strong arms, and if we have another war I would give them an 
opportunity to shew what they are made of.' That Colonel King's 
letter was the result of insanity is but too easily shewn. He says, 
remarks made six months before caused mutiny, and drove him to 
suicide, — but there was no mutiny, nor an idea of mutiny in the 
14th Dragoons, and the following letter to the Commander in Chief's 
Secretary, written immediately after the inspection, proves that the 
writer, Colonel King, was pleased and gratified with Sir C. Napier's 
address, and the assertions in his last letter are the hallucinations of 
a distempered mind. ' We were not a little gratified by the ex- 
pression of the approbation this morning of the most discerning, as 
well as deserving great Captain in India ; but I beg of you to believe 
that it was no friendly veil which the dust threw around us, conceal- 
ing good as well as evil.' 
' No more need be said. 

' W. Napier, Major- General.' 

The Case of Lieut. G. J. Ashton, H. M. 
53rd Foot. 

There is not much of novelty in the assertion that Sir Charles 
Napier is a very eccentric General, of a very original turn of mind ; 
but we think that the anecdote we are about to relate, will exhibit 
his conduct in a most outrageously peculiar style, such as would 
hardly even in these imitative days, find a copyist. It will be 
recollected that a few months since a young officer, Lieutenant G. 
Ashton, of II. M. 53rd, was dismissed the service for being intoxi- 
cated on duty. The Commander in Chief in confirming the sen- 
tence of the Court Martial, added remarks expressive of disgust at 
the crime, and recorded his firm determination to visit such offences 
with exemplary punishment. When the result of the Court Mar- 



APPENDIX. 



XXI 



tial became known, the mother of the unhappy young man, a 
woman of highly estimable character, wrote to Sir Charles Napier 
and told him how that her son, so far from being a dissolute cha- 
racter, had regularly remitted to her a considerable portion of his 
meagre allowances, to assist in supporting herself and Iris younger 
brothers and sisters. She said that if enquiry were made, it would 
be found that the crime which had ruined him in its consequences, 
was the first instance of a departure from the rules of sobriety, and 
begged that some mercy might be extended to his fault, in consi- 
deration of his affectionate conduct as a son, and previous worthiness 
as a soldier. The reply of the Commander in Chief disclosed his 
regret that these details had not been furnished at a previous date, 
as a knowledge of them might have mitigated the severity of his 
sentence, which, however was not too great for the proved offence. 
We believe that some further correspondence followed, and which 
was finally wound up, by the receipt some days since, of a letter 
from Sir Charles Napier, enclosing the price of an Ensign's Com- 
mission, as a donation from his private purse, the perverse old war- 
rior thus seeking to reconcile the claims of duty with the im- 
pulses of humanity ; forfeiting to the service the privileges of a 
sentenced prisoner, and atoning for the hardships of justice, by an 
act of liberal generosity. It is the frequent task of the journalist 
to dwell upon instances of singular action on the part of statesmen 
and generals, but it is seldom that their extravagancies take such a 
shape as this. It needs the occasional misdeeds of an Ashton to 
render us fully acquainted with the worth of a Napier, an illustra- 
tion of the well known axiom that misfortune is the parent of good- 
ness. — Madras Athenceum, January 8, 1850. 

At Peshawur. 

A letter from Peshawur, dated the 7th instant, says " Sir Charles 
arrived on the 1st of the month, and as yet all has gone on 
well. On the 4th, we had a grand review of the force with blank 
ammunition. The Commander in Chief addressed the troops as 
follows, but the words lose half their effect when given at second- 

d 



xxii 



a r r E ndix. 



hand — ' I do not know when I have come to inspect a body of 
troops with greater pleasure than I now meet the Peshawur force. 
The 60th, and I, are old friends ; they were long associated with 
me in Scinde. I knew them well long before that, in the 
Peninsular war. This month, forty years ago, I was in battle with 
the 60th. I took the greatest interest and pleasure in hearing of 
your gallantry at Mooltan, and lately in the Eusufzye Hills, and 
am delighted again to meet you. 

" ' With the 61st Regiment I am not so well acquainted, but I have 
heard of your distinguished conduct at the battle of Chillianwalla. 
Sir Colin Campbell tells me that in the heat of that action he ordered 
you to fire two rounds and then cease firing, and that you did so ; 
and I consider that the highest proof of discipline you could show. 
A Regiment that fires by order and ceases firing by order, can do any 
thing in action. 

" ' In the 98th Regiment I am happy to meet old friends who 
were under my command in England. Ten years ago I incurred a re- 
primand from the lamented Lord Hill, for reporting, when I present- 
ed colors to you, that I considered the 98th in a higher state of 
discipline than any corps I had seen ; and Lord Hill was right in 
reprimanding me, right as he was in every thing, for I had no right to 
make comparisons, and yet I did not regret it. 

" ' I was deeply interested, and truly sympathised in all your losses 
by sickness in China ; but that is past, and I am glad to see you 
here all in health, and as Sir Colin Campbell tells me, in a good 
state of discipline. 

" ' With the Native Regiments I am not acquainted, but I have 
been informed that the 31st and 70th Regiments distinguished them- 
selves in the last campaign.' 

" The review went off beautifully. Twice the whole Cavalry Brigade 
charged, and each time Sir Charles with his whole staff, and, of 
course, Sir Colin and his staff too, kept at their head. At the con- 
clusion he called all mounted Officers round him, and said — 

" I say now as I say every where, I am not making this tour to 
praise, but to find out faults ; and to-day I watched every thing most 



APPENDIX. 



XXIU 



narrowly, and I must say that I could not detect a single error. The 
discipline and appearance of the Force reflect the highest credit on 
Sir Colin Campbell, and the corps composing it." — Englishman, 
February 19, 1850. 

Expedition against the Afeeedies. 

Peshawar, 15th February 1850.- — In my last I promised that 
if we had a fight to send you an account of it. I therefore 
sit down to do so. We marched on the 9th instant, with the 
following troops under Brigadier Sir C. Campbell, accompanied 
by Sir C. Napier and the whole of his staff. The first day's 
march brought us to within five miles of the mouth of the pass 
leading through the range of mountains which separates the 
valley of Peshawur from Kohat. The next day we entered the 
pass, on approaching which Sir Charles received a message from 
the Afreedies saying that some of them were desirous of coming in 
but that others were for holding out against us. The reply sent 
was that the whole should surrender and lay down their arms and 
would be allowed an hour's time to consider of it. Meanwhile we 
halted at the mouth of the pass, and a favorable answer not having 
been received, at the expiration of the time allowed, the troops were 
again put in motion. Then commenced the work of destruction. 
Every village we came to was attacked and destroyed, under a 
desultory fire from the surrounding hills, some of which were 
crowned by our troops whose advance was covered by artillery. 
We had thus gained about ten miles through the pass when we 
came to a halt in the afternoon, and after taking and destroying the 
last village within reach, the camp was pitched. No sooner had we 
quietly settled down to make ourselves comfortable for the night 
than the enemy began to fire at us from every hill near camp. One 
in particular, under which the Head Quarters Camp was pitched, was 
soon occupied by the enemy who, under cover of the rocks, came half- 
way down and opened a fire upon our people, some of whom had gone 
for water to a pool immediately under this hill. Two sepoys and 



xxiv 



A P P E X D l X. 



a camp follower having been shot while drinking, and some of the 
enemy's shot having reached the Head Quarters Camp, Sir C. Camp- 
bell immediately ordered three Companies of the 31st Regiment to take 
the hill and keep possession of it during the night. I had just sat 
down to dress for dinner and was looking forward to a comfortable 
meal, after being on short commons the whole day when Capt. 
Hampton received an order to take command of the three Companies 
and storm the hill. Away they went, and as it was getting dark 
lost no time in carrying these orders into effect. The detachment was 
formed into skirmishing order and carried the hill without loss, the 
enemy having retired after exchanging a few shots with the detach- 
ment who, I am happy to say, behaved very well, much to their 
Commander's satisfaction, because the Chief and the whole of his 
staff were looking at them while ascending. They passed the night 
on the summit of the hill without being disturbed, and were 
recalled on the following morning just before the troops were again 
put in motion. The same proceedings marked our progress five 
miles further through the pass, when we again pitched our camp 
near its outlet within a few miles of Kohat, where we found some 
Irregular troops in our employ with four guns who had come from 
Kohat under the command of Lieut. Pollock, in political charge of 
that place, to assist us if necessary. Here we halted the next day, 
while Sir Charles proceeded to visit Kohat, in whose absence another 
village was taken and destroyed by Coke's fine fellows, who being 
mostly hill men were principally employed in crowning the heights 
and acquitted themselves nobly, though they had only received their 
arms the day before we marched. During our stay here an incident 
occurred which has cast a gloom upon us all, but it is one of those 
accidents inseparable from warfare in such a country. Two Com- 
panies of the 31st Regiment under Dunmore and Sitwell were ordered to 
ascend a height in rear of our camp and to hold it during the night. 
The party accordingly left camp and reached the summit before night 
without opposition, held it until the following morning without 
being disturbed and were then ordered to withdraw. Dun- 
more, who commanded the party, then carefully surveyed the hill 



APPENDIX. 



XXV 



which was very steep, high and rugged, and finding none of the 
enemy in sight proceeded to descend leisurely, but at the same time 
taking the precaution to do so by alternate companies ; the one 
covering the other in its descent. When Dunmore's company had 
nearly reached the foot of the hill with Sitwell's some distance above 
him covering his retirement, he met a party of twenty men of the 31st 
Regiment under a Native Officer on their way up to replace him and 
hold the hill during the day time. After having cautioned the Native 
Officer to be careful and vigilant, he continued his descent, and had 
nearly accomplished it, when he heard some firing above which 
induced him to halt and ascertain the cause. Owing to the preci- 
pitous nature of the hill it was some time before he could see what 
was going on, when he perceived that the enemy had opened fire 
and were throwing down stones. He immediately commenced reas- 
cending and met a part of Sitwell's company, from whom he learnt 
that the party which had been sent to hold the hill during the day 
had been attacked before it had quite reached the summit, on which 
Sitwell, who had continued his descent after passing this party, 
rushed back with a few of his men to support it. In doing so they 
became suddenly exposed to a murderous fire from the enemy, who 
under cover of the rocks above very soon destroyed poor Sitwell and 
the few men he had with him as well as the Native Officer's party. 
It was the work of a few minutes, and the mischief was done before 
any assistance could be rendered from below. The bodies of the 
unfortunate fellows who had been killed were much mutilated before 
they could be recovered. Poor Sitwell was much regretted by all 
who knew him. His remains were sent into Kohat for interment. 
The day after this melancholy occurrence we retraced our steps 
after having destroyed every village we could get at and returned to 
Peshawur yesterday, heartily sick of this desultory kind of warfare in 
which there is neither honor nor glory to be gained. The loss we 
have sutained has been heavy for so small a detachment, being upwards 
of one hundred of all ranks. The 31st alone has lost forty in killed 
and wounded. Hilliard, of the 23rd, has also been dangerously 
wounded, in a similar affair to that in which poor Sitwell fell, which 



xxvi 



APPENDIX. 



occurred on the same day. The Commander in Chief will return to 
Simla in a day or two. — Bengal Hurkaru, March 2, 1850. 

The following despatch or letter from Sir Charles Napier to the 
Governor General, containing his Excellency's account of the 
expedition, subsequently found its way into the public prints. — 
Compiler. 

" Head- Quarters, Camp Peshawur, \Qth February, 1850. 

My Lord, — In furtherance of your Lordship's orders to report on 
the frontier defence, especially on that of the Peshawur District, 
I was proceeding to Kohat, as on an ordinary march, when the 
Deputy Commissioner, Lieut. -Col. Lawrence, informed me, that a 
detachment of Sappers and Miners, repairing the road between Kohat 
and the Pass, had been unexpectedly attacked by a body of Afreedi 
tribe, aided by others of the Khyber and Durikzye tribes, to the 
number of from 700 to 1,200 men ; they massacred nearly all the 
Sappers and Miners ; no mercy was shown by the assailants, who 
came from the neighbouring villages, occupying the fastnesses of the 
long and perilous defile throughout the Afreedi range of mountains. 

2. By this unexpected attack, unprovoked by any misconduct on 
the part of the detachment, the Civil Station of Kohat was cut off ; 
and it became necessary to reinforce that station, and to punish the 
insurgent tribes. I therefore ordered the force named in the margin*, 
accompanied by my own escort, under the command of Brigadier 
Sir Colin Campbell, for those purposes on the 9th February. 

3. On the 10th we entered the Pass, and I was met by some 
Deputies from the village of Akhor, who endeavoured to exculpate 
themselves ; but Lieut. -Col. Lawrence having assured me that his 
information was correct as to what villages had formed the force that 

* One troop of Horse Artillery, with separate Elephant transport ; two 
5^-inch Mortars carried on one Elephant ; two Cos. 60th Rifles ; two Cos. 
61st Foot ; two Cos. 98th Foot ; 23rd Native Infantry C. in C.'s escort ; 
31st Regiment N. I. ; 15th Irregular Cavalry ; 1st Infantry Regiment and 
1st Cavalry Regiment Punjab Irregular Force. 



APPENDIX. 



XXV11 



massacred our detachment, and that this was one of those villages, 
my answer to the Deputies was, that their people must give them- 
selves and their arms up to me ; that they had received money from 
the British Government for protecting this road, and that instead of 
affording that protection they had murdered a detachment of our 
soldiers. I gave them an hour to consider what answer they would 
give to my summons to surrender themselves. At the end of the 
hour they returned, and said, that their companions would not listen 
to them. I therefore ordered Sir C. Campbell and Lieur.-Colonel 
Lawrence to crown the heights round the village, but not to fire 
unless fired upon. The moment our troops advanced, the Afreedi 
matchlockmen opened their fire, which was instantly returned, our 
troops driving the enemy before them in every direction. 

4. The Civil Authorities then burnt the village, and the column 
advanced five miles further to its encamping ground at Gurgoon Khail, 
which the enemy defended ; but it was taken ; and we pitched our 
camp, under the fire of matchlocks from the overhanging precipices. 

5. On the 11th we continued our march through the defile, con 
stantly skirmishing with the enemy, and encamped at Bosty Khail, 
about five miles from our last ground, and immediately under the 
Pass of Kohat, which was in possession of some irregular troops 
sent by the Assistant Commissioner, Lieut. Pollock, for that 
purpose. 

6. This evening I sent the 1st Punjab Cavalry, under Captain 
Daly, to Kohat, and myself examined the top of the Pass. The 
whole of that night the enemy kept continually firing upon our 
pickets. 

7. On the 12th, accompanied by my Staff, I rode to Kohat, and 
examined its defences and position, &c. &c, returning to camp about 
4 p. m. I ordered Brigadier Sir C. Campbell and Lieut. -Col. 
Lawrence to make preparations for our return to Peshawur the next 
morning, which they accordingly did, ordering the 1st Punjab Infan- 
try to hold the high ground till our rear guard was out of sight, 
when this excellent Regiment retired to Kohat, which was thus re- 
inforced by two Corps, one of Cavalry and one of Infantry. 



xxviii 



APPENDIX. 



8. In one march the column swept through the whole defile, 
skirmishing with the enemy all the way, and reaching Muthuee 
between three and four o'clock, seventeen miles from the morning's 
ground, and on the 14th we returned to Peshawur. 

9. The Civil Authorities burnt six of the offending villages 
known to Col. Lawrence as having been concerned in the massacre 
of our detachment. 

10. The whole of these operations were ably conducted by Bri- 
gadier Sir C. Campbell and Lieut.-Col. Lawrence, commanding the 
Military and Civil Forces, respectively. 

11. Lieut.-Col. Lawrence will of course mcke his report to the 
Punjab Government ; and I have the honor to enclose that of Sir 
Colin Campbell, together with a copy of my own General Order, for 
your Lordship's information. 

12. It may be as well to remark, that all the villages that were 
destroyed had been previously abandoned, none but fighting men 
remained in them. 

13. The conduct of the troops of all ranks was excellent. 

14. We have necessarily lost some brave soldiers in these opera 
tions. Twenty men have been slain, and seventy-four wounded ; 
among the former, I have to lament the gallant young Sitwell, and 
four brave comrades who fell at his side, viz., Havildar Gholab Dir- 
chet, Naick Madho Sing, and Sepoys Meerwan Opudeea and Deen- 
bund Pandy, of the 31st Native Infantry. The Havildar and two 
Sepoys, named Sobha Ram and Buctour Ram, attempted to carry 
off their wounded leader. 

15. The Havildar was killed, the two Sepoys desperately wound- 
ed ; they were rescued by their comrades afterwards, and are now in 
hospital. The Naik Hoolas Khan went four times up the hill in 
face of the enemy, accompanied by Buctour Khan, and brought 
away a wounded man each time. These were great deeds of valour 
and self-devotion done by soldiers of humble rank, and I claim for 
these four men, Hoolas Khan, Sobha Ram, Buctour Ram, and 
Buctour Khan, the " Order of Merit" at your Lordship's hands. 
Alas ! young Sitwell is beyond human reward. He fell rushing 



APPENDIX. 



XXIX 



against the enemy, and calling on his men to follow, and they obeyed 
him. When he fell, he tried in vain to make them leave him to an 
unsparing foe, and save their lives ; they obeyed not then, but died 
w ith him ! Heroic was the young spirit that inspired such deeds ! The 
Jemadar who commanded the party when Sitwell fell, is said to have 
conducted himself with admirable judgment, coolness, and courage, 
and the enemy were defeated in this desperate combat. There was 
noble leading and intrepid following ! 

I have, &c, 

C. J. Napier, General 

Commander in Chief. 

Mr. Morgan versus Mrs. Rowe. 

As Sir Charles Napier is so soon about to retire, it would be 
well, we think, to collect and publish a volume of Napieriana. We 
have read several very characteristic letters, which we regret that 
we were not permitted to publish ; but one has just been handed 
to us for that purpose, and we accordingly subjoin it. The affair, 
as related to us, is as follows. A person employed in a public 
office, in sending a small sum due to Mr. Rowe, addressed him 
as Sergeant Rowe. The Sergeant's better half was incensed at 
this, he being a tailor by trade and employed in the Clothing 
Department, and probably expected to be addressed Esquire. She 
wrote an angry letter to the offender, who considering the Sergeant 
implicated, complained to the Commanding Officer of the station, 
and not obtaining the redress he expected, forwarded his complaint 
to the Commander in Chief, from whom he received the following 
reply, which we think would have been recognised without the 
signature : — 

Camp, 18tk April, 1850. 
" SiPv, — I have received your complaint, and your very sensible 
remarks on Mrs. Sergeant Rowe's letter. There is, as you say, 
nothing disgraceful in being a Sergeant, any more than in being a 

e 



XXX 



A P P E N l> 1 X. 



tailor j which by your letter Sergeant Rowe appears to be. My 
opinion is that he who wears an uniform is of higher rank than he 
who makes it ; and the Sergeant is, in my mind, much the highest 
in rank of the two ! — all soldiers are gentlemen, and tailors are only 
tailors ! But it seems that Mrs. Rowe thinks otherwise, and prefers 
being a tailor's wife, to being an Officer's wife. Now, in my opinion, 
a lady has a right to hold her own opinion on these matters, and I 
am unable to give you any redress, because my Commission as Com- 
mander in Chief gives me no power to make ladies apologize for 
being saucy, which is an unfortunate habit that they fall into at times 
and more specially those who are good-looking, which I suppose Mrs. 
Sergeant Rowe happens to be. As to the Sergeant having written 
the letter, that is, neither here nor there, some husbands cannot well 
help doing as they are ordered, and he may be innocent of malice. 

" The only thing that I can do is to advise you to apply to your 
superior, the Collector and Magistrate of Furruckabad, who will re- 
present the insult which has been put upon you by Mr. Sergeant 
Rowe (as you state,) and, if possible, Major Tucker will endeavour 
to persuade the lady to apologize for calling you an ass. More than 
giving vou this advice I cannot do. 

" (Signed) C. J. Napier, 

" Commander in Chief." 

Englishman, 28th June 1850.] 

The above, which bears strong internal evidence of authenticitv, 
will be further illustrated by the following equally authentic-looking, 
and equally amusing letter published in the Delhi Gazette, as from 
Mrs. Rowe, the saucy lady who wrote Mr. Morgan down an 
ass. — Compiler. 

To the Editor oj the Delhi Gazette. 

Sir, — As you have copied from the Englishman, a letter said to 
be a transcript of one wrote by His Excellency the Commander in 
Chief, and the Editor's remarks on the same, which are quite 
wrong, perhaps vou will have the honesty to insert this letter in your 



APPENDIX. 



XXXI 



paper also, that it may be known what small cause was given for 
his great display of caustic wit. 

In the first place, I did not know any such person, as the Mr. Jas. 
Morgan, to whom the Commander in Chief is supposed to have 
wrote ; neither is it possible, (from enquiries I have since made re- 
garding this person) that either my husband, or myself, could have 
had cash, or any other communication with this individual. The 
mistake originates thus : — I make Cheese. C. Raikes, Esq., C. S.. 
sent to me from Mynpoorie, to send one for him to a native whose 
name, I think, is Soo,ur doomche Lai, who, I believe, acts as agent 
for the above gentleman. As he was ordered, some time after the 
Cheese was sent, to pay me the amount due for the same, he sent 
the cash, with a note directed to my husband, (who has of course 
nothing to do with Cheese making) I felt annoyed, at the circum- 
stance, knowing the native did not write English, and taking it for 
granted, it had been wrote in the style it was and directed to him 
purposely to give offence, I retaliated by writing on the back of the 
note, (as near as I can remember) " Mrs. Rowe has received the 
amount of C. Raikes' Esqr.'s Bill, and she would thank Mr. Soo, ur 
doomche Lai, if he would inform her, what impertinent ass, of the 
genius kerannie, he hires to write his notes that has the presumption 
to style Mr. Rowe Sergt." About a month after the above was 
wrote, a friend informed me, that a person of the name of Jas. Morgan 
was the writer of the note, that he not only acknowledged to have 
wrote it, (Query, is it honest or lawful to write notes, of any tenor 
and sign them with another person's name?) but had positively sent a 
petition on stamped paper to the Magistrate, praying for redress, stat- 
ing that I had wrote words tending to create a breach of the peace ! ! ! ! 
This was of course thrown out, and the puissant individual then ap- 
pealed to the Judge, with the same result, afterwards to my hus- 
band's master, Major A. Tucker, C. B., agent for Army Clothing, 
and finally to the Commander in Chief. Now, Sir, considering that 
my husband, five children, and myself, might have been seriously 
injured, by the above proceeding, even admitting, (for the argument's 
sake only) that I was wrong, don't you think the above proceedings 



xxxn 



APPENDIX. 



particularly manly and courageous ? Verily it is a pity the Eurasian 
Cavalry were not formed. To suppose that my husband " probably 
expected to be addressed Esquire," is a most erroneous supposition, 
for of all animals, in his, and my estimation, " an ape the gentleman" 
(vide Mr. McBarnett's advertisement) is the most despicable, and we 
have been so much in the habit of ridiculing the sort of biped, (for 
there are several in this station) that it is not at all the wish of my 
husband to increase the number. 

I think, Sir, a respectable tradesman, who has been a Foreman at 
Home, who came to India, as Master Tailor of H. M.'s 3rd Buffs, 
(recommended by Mr. Buckmaster) and was transferred to the Hon'ble 
Company's Service to fill his present situation, is not wrong in ex- 
pecting to see the affix of Mr. to his name when addressed by Civi- 
lians ; with the Military, Sergeant has been his highest and lowest 
for (lo) fifteen years, and he, I know, wishes for no other. 

After all I do not believe the letter is Sir Charles's for His 
Excellency is reported to be an excellent and consistent writer, and in 
the letter it is wrote " he who wears an uniform is of higher rank 
than he who makes it" ; this is not suitable to the case, for my hus- 
band being a soldier does both. Again, "all soldiers are gentlemen." 
No, His Excellency could not have wrote it, for in the remarks on a re- 
cent Court Martial the words are " I have no doubt the Sergeant will 
willingly forgive this drunken young blackguard," or words to this effect. 
I should have wrote before, but waited to see if the We, with the 
" wip of formidable dimensions," would manage to twist a little soap 
out of it, as I felt convinced he could not, but I was mistaken, for 
four or five lines of a nice soft sort are administered in his issue of 
the 6th instant. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient Servant, 
Futtyghur, Aug. 13, 18.30. M. A. Rowe. 

Delhi Gazette, Aug. 17, 1850.] 



APPENDIX. 



xxxiii 



The Case of Dr. Edlin and Captain Fagan. 

Dr. Edward Edlin was sentenced by a General Court Martial to 
suspension from rank, pay and allowances for six months, on convic- 
tion of having used violent and improper language to Captain C. G. 
Fagan. Dr. Edlin's conduct was justified, or at least excused by the 
contents of a letter from Captain Fagan to him, on the affairs of the 
Benares Bank, but at the time of the trial this letter had been sent 
to England and could not, of course, be laid before the Court Mar- 
tial. On being returned it was forwarded to Sir Charles Napier, who 
acknowledged its effect by an immediate order for cancelling the un- 
expired portion of Dr. Edlin's sentence and for bringing Captain 
Fagan to trial before a Court Martial, by which he was sentenced to 
dismissal from the service. Captain Fagan's letter to Dr. Edlin 
was as follows : — 

"Benares, February 23, 1849. 
My Dear Edlin, — You will have wondered at my delay in 
replying to your letter about the Bank, but it has been intentional, 
as I wished the public meeting of the day before yesterday to pass 
over before writing to you. With the expired half-year (31st Janu- 
ary,) I resigned my seat in the Direction, as I found its duties press 
too much on my mind and time, and I was satisfied with the securi- 
ties I left for the Bank's well doing, the solemn half-yearly written 
declaration that is to be made by Directors and Secretary, that a 
fourth of the capital had not disappeared during the half-year (a 
measure entirely of my own suggestion) with the auditors that were 
to be half-yearly appointed, and with our Secretary, of whom I have 
a very high opinion and whose wife and daughter (to whom he is 
much attached) have a large stake in the Bank. I was requested 
however to return and did so, on the proviso that I was no more to 
be one of the managing Directors, but to have their full powers, so 
that I know all that is going on in the Bank, and can interpose 
where I see needful. The report now issued (you will get it in 2 or 
3 days) is the production entirely of parties (now joined in the Direc- 
tion) who always clamoured for a reform in the Bank, and for entire 



XXXIV 



APPENDIX. 



publicity to its accounts, &c, so that in it you have their opinion 
of the Bank, and I have no objection to vouch for the truthfulness of 
all it contains. We are going on as steadily and warily as possible, 
and I at least have the satisfaction of nothing having occurred in the 
Bank, while I was on its Direction, which on the score of honest in- 
tention and exercise of my best judgment, I could wish not to have 
occurred. 

How are you, and how is your Camp ? The eyes of India are 
upon it, and those eyes also, I trust, which run to and fro through 
the earth controlling all things, and hearing prayer, for his name's 
sake. 

Ever yours truly, 

C. G. Fagan." 

Dr. Edlin died on the 6th April 18o(), his death being, it is to be 
feared, hastened, if not caused, by the anxieties and vexations attending 
this sad affair. — Compiler. 

Cause of Resignation. 

Sir Charles Napier's resignation had reached England before the last 
mail left it, and the Englishman s London correspondent states, that 
both the Duke, the Ministry and the Court of Directors consider him 
in the wrong in the matter which led to his resignation. He will 
not, therefore, be importuned to remain, and the next mail will pro- 
bably bring the name of his successor. We are confident that even 
the most ardent admirers of Sir Charles Napier will concur in opinion 
with his friend, the Duke, and consider it beneficial to the public 
service, that Sir Charles Napier should retire from India, to the quiet 
enjoyment of the laurels he has earned. His further continuance in 
India is incompatible with the good government of this empire. We 
do not allude so much to the constant spirit of antagonism which he 
has manifested towards the Governor General, and every functionary 
independent of him, and which renders it so utterly impossible to 
obtain any harmony of co-operation ; we refer to that which alone 
was before the Duke, the immediate cause of his resignation. By 



A PPEXDI X. 



XXXV 



an old rule, which has been in existence for a long series of years, 
the native troops receive compensation when the price of atta and 
other necessary articles exceeds a certain price. Sixteen seers for 
atta is, we think, the maximum. In the Punjab atta was very dear, 
9 or 10 seers for a rupee ; ghee, dal, and other articles, correspond- 
ingly cheap. The Military Auditor General explained to Govern- 
ment some time ago that the calculation for remuneration as laid 
down in the rules was not adhered to. The basis of it was that a 
sepoy's food should not cost him more than Three Rupees and a 
half, or half his pay. The Auditor General therefore stated, that 
the account should be in the nature of a debit and credit one ; that 
is, that the loss on the atta, and the gam on other articles should 
go against each other ; and that the difference was the sum he was 
entitled to. There is no doubt, we believe, that this is the correct 
rule ; it was in this manner that the remuneration was calculated in 
Cabul, The Governor General in Council on this wrote to the 
Commander in Chief requesting that the compensation might in 
future be calculated on this principle ; but His Excellency, on receiv- 
ing the communication, issued a Circular to the Generals and Briga- 
diers in command, to say that this was altogether a mistake, and that 
they were to make no difference in the system they had pursued. 
The Governor General, as might have been expected, felt no incon- 
siderable annoyance. He did not think fit to alter Sir Charles 
Napier's order but he pointed out that the instructions he had issued, 
as the head of the Government, were clear and explicit, and could 
admit of no doubt, and that if the Commander in Chief could thus set 
them aside, no order of Government could be of any avail. Sir 
Charles flared up, and immediately sent in his resignation, which we 
are happy to perceive has been accepted, for there was some fear lest 
he should have been solicited to recal it. — Friend of India, Sep- 
tember 26, 1850. 



XXXV] 



APPENDIX. 



Speech on presenting new Colors to H. M. 
22nd Foot, at Umballah. 

" It is a great pleasure to me, O Soldiers, to close my command of 
the Indian Armies by having the honor to present to the 22nd Regi- 
ment their new Colors. It is now eight years since this brave Regiment, 
then only 500 strong, and under that noble soldier Pennefather, and 
joined by our dusky and brave companions in arms the glorious 
25th and 12th Regiments of Bombay N. I. won the battle of Meeanee 
— won the battle of Hyderabad — won Scinde for England and won 
for themselves these proud Colors decorated with the records of 
your fame ! Soldiers ! Well may I be proud of being your Colonel 
— well may I be proud of being Colonel of that Regiment which stood 
by the King of England at Dettengen — stood by the celebrated 
Lord Peterborough at Barcelona, and into the arms of whose Grena- 
diers the immortal Wolfe fell on the heights of Abraham. Well 
may I exult in the command of such a Regiment ! But I will pass 
over bygone glories and speak of what has happened in our own 
times — never can I forget the banks of the Fullailee and the bloody 
bed of that river ! where two thousand of our men fought thirty-five 
thousand enemies ! where for three hours the musket and bayonet 
encountered the sword and shield in mortal combat ! for on that 
dreadful day no man spared a foe, we were too weak for mercy ! 
Shall I ever forget the strong and lofty entrenchments of Dubba 
— where the 22nd advanced in line unshaken, a living wall ! and 
under a murderous fire stormed the works ! There those honored 
old Colors of which we have just taken leave, bravely borne forward 
by their Ensigns Bowden and Blake, one of whom Lieut. Bowden 
I see before me bearing them this day, but in a higher rank, were in a 
few minutes seen wing triumphantly aloft amidst the combatants 
on the summit, 

Men of Meeanee ! you must remember with exultation and with 
pride what a view burst upon your sight when under a heavy fire 
you reached the bank of the river, a hurl of shields, and Scindian 
capped and turbanned heads and Hashing scimitars high brandished 



APPENDIX. 



XXXV11 



in the air, spread as a sea before you and 35,000 valiant warriors 
of Beloochistan threatening you with destruction ! Then the hostile 
armies closed and clashed together, and desperate combats thickened 
along the line ! The superb 9th Cavalry of Bengal and the re- 
nowned Scinde Horse — the dark chivalry of India burst as a thun- 
der storm cloud charging into the dry bed of the torrent, driving the 
foe before them ! At that moment a terrible cry arose on the right ! 
It was the dreadful British shout of battle ! It began with the 22nd 
and was re-echoed from right to left from Regiment to Regiment 
along the line ! Lines of levelled bayonets now gleamed charging 
through the smoke, and the well-fought field of Meeanee was your 
own ! 

Soldiers ! these are not deeds that pass away like summer clouds 
and are forgotten ! they remain fixed on the minds of men, they are 
recorded in the pages of History ! Young Soldiers of the 22nd — 
when future battles arise and the strife grows heavy and strong, re- 
member the deeds that were done by these old Soldiers of Meeanee ! 
It was they who covered these Colors with laurels ! It was they who 
won the legends which these standards bear emblazoned in golden 
letters on the silks ! Remember these things and shoulder to shoulder 
win the day ! And now, young Soldiers, a few words about drill. It is 
tiresome and often disheartening and annoys men, but remember that 
it is drill that makes Companies and Regiments and Brigades and 
Divisions act together, and to strike as it were with great and mighty 
blows — it is drill which gives you the battle and the glory of Vic- 
tory. 

Ensigns take these new Colors from my hands. I know you will 
carry them gloriously on the day of battle, and if you fall, still the 
Colors of the 22nd will advance, for brave men will never be wanting 
in the field to bear them forward to victory with fire and steel ! And 
now 22nd take your Colors, and let the ancient city of Chester 
begirt by its proud old walls exult in the glories of its own brave 
Regiment." 

Lieut- Col Boileau, Comg. 22nd Regt, in reply. — In the 
name of the Officers and Soldiers of your Regiment, I thank you for 

/ 



XXXV1U 



AITENPIX. 



honoring us all, by personally presenting our new Colors, an honor 
for which we all feel grateful and proud, and if any thing were 
needed to cause us to feel the value of these Colors entrusted to our 
charge, in peace or war, as our chance may be, it will be the cherished 
remembrance that it was our gallant Colonel who gave them to us 
with his own hand." — Mofussilite, Nov. 26, 1850. 

His Excellency the Commander in Chief has been pleased to 
publish the following Order relative to the presentation of Colors to 
his own Regiment the gallant 22nd or Cheshire. 

The simplicity and soldier-like style of this order is in singular 
and favorable contrast with that of his viva voce address on the 
occasion of presenting their new Colors to the Regiment : — 

REGIMENTAL ORDERS. 

Head Quarters, Camp Loodianah, 30th November 1850. 

I was delighted with the appearance and state of the 22nd Regi- 
ment. I found one thousand powerful, healthy men on parade, good 
Soldiers all, and but 29 men in hospital, with trifling ailments, not a 
case of fever or dysentery among them. The whole Regiment is in 
good order, and fit in all points for war. 

My stay was too short, and the ground too precipitous to exer- 
cise the Regiment, but I saw enough to assure me, that it is fit to 
take its place in a line of Battalions, or to be thrown out in front as 
a light Corps and in either position to do itself and its Commanding 
Officer credit. I told the Regiment that I feel proud of being its 
Colonel, and I repeat it, I am proud, very very proud of it. 

I brought the 22nd and 60th into the Hills, that I might have 
two effective Regiments under my hand, in case of sudden need. I 
hope that my Successor will keep them both in their present quar- 
ters for the next two years. He will then always have two thousand 
healthy, strong and practical Soldiers ready for service. 

I was glad to see the friendship which exists between these two 
fine Regiments. This makes men work well together in action and 
in every way that becomes Soldiers. I now bid adieu for the present 
to the Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and Privates of my 



APPENDIX. 



xxxix 



Regiment with the hope that we shall again meet in England. But 
meet again or not meet again, my wishes will always be for their 
health, and for the glory of their Colors in battle. 

(Signed) C. J. Napier, General, 

Commander in Chief, 
and Col. of H. M. 22nd Regt. of Foot. 
Mofmsilite, December 10, 1850.] 

At Ferozepore. 

Ferozepore, Wth Dee. 1850. — His Excellency Sir Charles 
Napier reached this on the 9th instant. A kind greeting awaited 
him on the troops being drawn up in line alongside the road for 
his reception, the 87th R. I. F. on the right, with the Artillery 
thrown back at a right angle, and facing his approach ; arrange- 
ments were made to distinguish Sir Charles from the numerous 
parties of horsemen coming in the same direction, who with ele- 
phants, camels, carts and foot passengers made such a dust, that 
the first gun, announcing His Excellency, had fired before any of 
the three thousand men awaiting him, had caught a glimpse of his 
person. No sooner, however, did the veteran catch the sound, than 
he put spurs to his horse, and dashed with the whole cavalcade of his 
staff down on the troops like an eagle stooping on his prey. He was 
met by the presentation of arms, and three cheers along the whole 
line — a worthy tribute to his service, his years, his high rank and his 
anxiety for the public weal. The last military tribute probably 
that Bengal can pay him, but it is one that carries with it the warm 
expression of our wishes for his welfare. 

Sir Charles rode leisurely down two-thirds of the line, when, either 
to save time, or to indulge a natural impatience of inactivity, he 
started again, and wheeling sharply round the left flank, amidst clouds 
of dust, in which half his cortege were lost, he dashed along the rear 
and round to the front again, and would have put the troops in move- 
ment had the time and ground permitted, but, on consideration, they 



xl 



APPENDIX. 



were dismissed with an expression of His Excellency's approbation 
of their appearance. 

On the 10th at a dinner given by H. M. 87th Fusiliers, where 
upwards of 50 persons sat down, after the health of Her Majesty 
had been proposed, that of Sir Charles followed, and was drank with 
the usual honors. In reply, His Excellency alluded to his having, 
when quite a boy, been connected with the 87th, and he concluded 
by proposing in connection with them, the health of their Colonel 
Lord Gough, than whom, he remarked, a worthier or a more truly 
noble minded man does not breathe. Sir Charles said he had long 
known Lord Gough more or less, but that lately he had had oppor- 
tunity to become better acquainted with his real character, and he 
would repeat, a more amiable, or a more noble-minded man did not 
exist. He concluded by saying " the 87th are worthy of their 
Baron." 

Then followed the healths of Sir Dudley Hill, and of Brigadier 
Gowan, to which suitable replies having been made, Sir Charles re- 
sumed the conversation by remarking that he had often heard com- 
parisons drawn between the Officers of the two services, the Royal 
and the Company's ; for his part he could find no difference ; we are 
all from the same stock and the same families — he had always found 
the Officers of the Sepoy Army in the day of action outstripping 
their men to the front, and the men themselves the best in the world 
(as far as his experience goes and it is extensive) to support H. M. 
Troops. He called heaven to witness that though he had led into 
action men from the three Presidencies of Bengal, Bombay, and 
Madras, he had never seen one of them flinch from his duty. The 
men then are good ; of the Officers he would say no more than " they 
are our brothers" ; and he begged to propose the health of " the 
Sepoy of the Indian Army," a toast, probably, never given before but 
not the less heartily responded to. 

I have omitted to say that Sir Charles alluded to Ferozepore as 
the last station in which he would appear as Commander in Chief, 
and therefore he was glad of having an opportunity to express in 
a Queen's Mess, his high esteem of the Indian Army ; to have done 



APPENDIX. 



xli 



so at other tables might have seemed flattering, but here he felt more 
at liberty to speak freely. 

The preceding is but a faint sketch of what so openly fell from 
Sir Charles' hps. But there is one great fact involved in his words, 
viz., his expressed approbation of the Indian Army, which may ren- 
der them of value and moment hereafter. 

On the 11th Sir Dudley Hill ordered the troops to parade in line 
for Brigade exercise. 

Sir Charles came to look on, but seemed to require that no attention 
should be paid to him. After advancing, covered by light infantry, 
the enemy's cavalry and artillery were observed in the distance, and 
Sir Charles, perceiving with his usual readiness, flew to them and 
taking command sent to Sir Dudley an intimation of his intention to 
turn his left flank, the line changed front to the left by throwing for- 
ward the right, and supporting the left by cavalry which moved along 
its rear followed by the artillery, and Sir Charles for once was 
defeated. 

When the change of front had been effected and Commanding 
Officers called to the front, Sir Charles said he had purposely taken 
the troops unawares ; he had discovered and altered all the pre-con- 
ceived arrangements of the day, and he desired to say he had never 
seen troops more ready in hand, or more quick and steady in move- 
ment. 

The whole then marched in open column, past a flag placed pur- 
posely near a group of elephants on which were all the beauty and 
fashion of the station. The elephants served as an excellent land- 
mark to the troops who were too far to see the flag, and their 
position also gave an opportunity for the ladies to see Sir Charles, 
the troops, and the saluting. — Lahore Chronicle, December 14, 
1850. 

The following is from Ferozepore, December 17th : — " The race 
ball went off very well, and was attended by Sir C. Napier, and his 
staff. Dancing was kept up until past one A. M. Sir Dudley took his 
departure on the afternoon of that day. The whole force was drawn 
up yesterday along the road to the ghat at 3 o'clock p. m. to honor 



xlii 



APPENDIX. 



the departure of the Ex-commander, who attended by a host of well- 
wishers, rode up to each regiment in succession, and addressed the 
Commanding Officer in very nearly these words. — " Lieut. Col. 

tell the officers and men of your regiment that I leave the 

command of this fine Army, with feelings of regret and sorrow, owing 
to particular circumstances, which alone cause me to leave you !" 
As he passed the line, arms were presented, and drums and bugles 
having sounded, the artillery fired a " General's" salute : — a few 
drops of rain falling at the time (as they did also in his late entry,) 
caused the " dusky" portion of the " chivalry" to exclaim that 
' doubtless heaven favored him' ! It is arranged that the 46th 
Regt. N. I., form the escort for the Camp downwards." — Dehli 
Gazette, December 25, 1850. 

At Kurrachee. 

Station Staff Dinner, lith Jamtary 1850. — "Next came the 
toast of the evening, the health of Sir Charles Napier, which was 
proposed by Brigadier General Manson, who in a short but happy 
speech alluded to all the numerous brilliant exploits of Sir Charles, 
already before the world, and to his last appointment of Com- 
mander in Chief in India, when the eyes of the whole world were 
upon him, as the only General capable of saving India from the 
danger apprehended. On the close of the speech the cheers were 
long and deafening, and it was some time before any thing like 
silence reigned again. 

Sir Charles next stood up, evidently affected, and returned thanks 
for the honor that had been done him, in drinking his health. Of 
course every body expected a speech and we were not disappointed ; 
His Excellency proceeded in his usual happy strain, as well as we 
can recollect, as follows : 

" Gentlemen, — Brigadier Manson has referred to my former 
services, but although I am, and so ought any man to be, proud of 
having seen service, I cannot for a moment claim all the credit to 
myself. It was to the gallant Bombay Army that I commanded, 



APPENDIX. 



xliii 



that the credit was due, and yet again I must not give all to the 
Bombay Army. There was the brave 9th Bengal Cavalry and the 
hardy little band of Madras Sappers. But there was my own, the 
22nd Queen's Regiment, there was the brave 25th Regiment Bom- 
bay N. I., which Regiment I love, and then there was the 12th and 
8th Regiments N. I., and Bombay Artillery, and this army gave us 
the victory. There was also the first Grenadiers which I cannot 
leave out. It is true there was some misunderstanding with regard 
to the Grenadiers, but I know the Grenadiers to be brave 
soldiers, and in battle the slightest confusion or misunderstanding is 
sometimes likely to cast a shade on the best Regiment, whether 
Queen's or Company's. Look at the 14th Queen's Dragoons. 
There is not a braver set of men in the world, and yet some mis- 
understanding at Chillianwalla caused confusion in this brave Regi- 
ment, which in another battle, only a few days before, had so nobly 
distinguished itself. As I cannot accept all the praise myself neither 
can the brave army share it all ; there is another under whose 
orders I and that army acted, and to whom honor is due, and that 
person is Lord Ellenborough. I was acting under his orders. As 
a thorough Statesman, after once giving me command, he treated me 
as a General Officer. I had his orders to do so and so, and I did 
so and so, which resulted in the conquest of Scinde. I was vilified 
for this, abused and scorned, but Lord Ellenborough was a wise poli- 
tician, and I am not a man to shrink from my duty when honorably 
treated and trusted as a General Officer in the British Army. If it 
was not for the conquest of Scinde, I ask you, Gentlemen, where 
would General Whish and Lord Gough and Lord Dalhousie have 
been by this ? Mind, I do not mean to cast the slightest slur on any 
of these parties. Lord Gough is a noble brave old Soldier, but I 
maintain that if it had not been for the conquest of Scinde, which 
enabled a gallant Bombay Army to appear at Mooltan and Goojrat, 
I maintain that if Scinde had not been ours at the time, General 
Whish and Lord Gough would not have gained what they have so 
gloriously gained, and the Meers would have marched to the aid of 
Moolraj with one hundred thousand hardy Beloochees to drive us 



xliv 



APPENDIX. 



from the country. Ask my friend Scott (tapping Colonel Scott on 
the shoulder) where General Whish would have been, if Scinde had 
not been ours and a Bombay Army not able to march on Mooltan, 
and he will tell you where. However, I am digressing from my 
point, which is, to thank you all, Gentlemen, for the honor you have 
done me. You are all Bombay Officers now assembled here, and 
I feel happy in the society of Bombay Officers. It is to them I 
owe a great deal. I entered on command with them nine years ago. 
I have commanded an independent Army with full and unrestricted 
powers, and I have fought and gained victory at the head of the 
gallant Bombay Army. There are a few here now who have 
shared with me in battle — there is Hill and Green, jind Marston, 
but for whose sword I should not have been here to night." There 
is therefore much that attaches me to the brave Bombay Army, and 
I never can forget that army. I served as a General Officer with that 
army for nine years, and I am now an old man about 70 years of 
age. I was about 63 or 64, Colonel Wilson says he is about 63 or 
64 now, (much laughter) when I fought at their head and gained 
victory, and how can I forget that army ! Lord Ellenborough 
trusted me as a General Officer and the brave Bombay Army 
seconded me nobly. Not as is the custom now-a-days for a Ge- 
neral Officer entrusted with command to be told by a Colonel and a 
Captain that this thing is right and that thing is wrong ! (Much 
cheering). If General Officers are unfit for command, in God's 
name do not appoint them to command, and I must say there are 
nine out of ten who ought not to be appointed ; but I hold that 
when once a General Officer is appointed to command he ought to 
be treated as such, he ought to know what is best for the army 
under his command, and should not be dictated to by boy politicals 
who do not belong to the army, and who know nothing what- 
ever of military science. It is this, Gentlemen, this, that has caused 
me to resign my command. I have been thus explicit with you, 
because I am among my own Bombay Officers once more. It is 
this, I repeat, that has caused me to resign ; and now, Gentlemen. 
I again thank you all for the honor you have done me." 



APPENDIX, 



xlv 



Sir Charles sat down amidst most deafening cheering. 

Mr. Pringle next rose and proposed a bumper toast to the health 
of Lady Napier, with three cheers and one more, and which was 
drunk with all enthusiasm and cheering. 

Sir Charles again rose and addressed the Company as follows : 
' Mr. Pringle, I thank you, and you also, Gentlemen, for the honor 
you have done me in drinking the health of my wife : my 
wife is a good wife, and when one has a good wife, any honor 
paid to her causes her husband to feel it much, and I feel deeply 
the honor you have paid her. If soldiers are not to have wives, of 
course it is a different thing, (much cheering) but when one has a 
good wife, as mine is, I feel the honor deeply, and now Mr. Pringle, 
I have to thank you for the honor you have done to me and the care 
you have taken of my second wife (Scinde). Gentlemen, when 
Mr. Pringle relieved me from the Government of Scinde, I was 
vilified, my Government was abused, run down, and abuse against 
me had supporters among the Government, but Mr. Pringle has upheld 
my Government as far as was in his power ; he has acted nobly, 
generously, and honorably, and I am proud of the opportunity now 
afforded me of publicly expressing my gratitude to you, Mr. Prin- 
gle.' — Mqfussilite, January 28, 1850. 

Speech at the 83rc? Mess, on the loth January 1851. — 
" When Lord Clive came to India, it could only be compared to a 
calf — when Lord Wellesley governed, India was like heifer, but 
when Lord Ellenborough arrived as Governor General, India had 
become a full-grown bull — therefore, Lord Clive had to carry a calf, 
Lord Wellesley a heifer, but Lord Ellenborough a full-grown bull. 
His Excellency continued by remarking that Lord Dalhousie was de- 
serving of no credit for the annexation of the Punjaub ; it was an act that 
was forced upon him ; while Lord Ellenborough, a calm and profound 
statesman, had to act for himself which was quite a different thing." 

Speech at the 64th Mess on the 17 th January. — Gentlemen, 
Colonel Stopford has done me the honor of drinking my health, and 

9 



xlvi 



APPENDIX. 



ill which you all have joined, and for which I feel very thankful. He 
has also drank it as a Soldier and bid me a Soldier's welcome, and 
I could not feel prouder of an hour's oration in my favor, than I do 
of the Colonel's short speech. He has also adverted to the Con- 
quest of Scinde, but as I have often said before, the honor for that 
Conquest is not due to me : it is due to Lord EUenborough, under 
whose orders I, and the Army that I commanded, acted. Lord 
EUenborough is a noble, honorable, farsighted politician. He knew 
very well, and any body with three ideas must have known the 
same (cheering) that the Punjaub must one day be ours, and with 
that foresight which distinguished him, he ordered me, when the 
Meers showed treachery and a disinclination to do what they ought 
to have done, — he ordered me, I say, Gentlemen, to come to blows 
with them ; and by the bye it was pretty hard blows when we 
were at it (cheering) ; and now, Gentlemen, I will give you an 
instance of Lord Ellenborough's eminent statesmanship, and his 
forethought as a thorough politician. As I said before, every body 
with an idea must have known that the Punjaub would one day be 
ours, and Lord EUenborough therefore ordered me to build a large 
Sarai or Depot for Merchandize at Sukkur. It was Lord Ellen- 
borough's intention to draw all the trade, whether from Russia or 
Persia, or Cabool, to Sukkur, and from there it would either go 
down or up the river in boats. It was also Lord Ellenborough's 
wish to build a dock-yard at Sukkur, and to make every arrange- 
ment for building small boats and steamers there. Now, Gentle- 
men, I suppose you all know, that the Indus above Sukkur or 
Mithenkote branches out into five streams, like a lady's fan. Well, 
to navigate these branches, smaller boats are required than those 
used on the Indus, below Sukkur, which is sometimes like a little 
sea. Well, it was Lord Ellenborough's wish to build small boats 
and steamers to carry merchandize from the depot at Sukkur 
upwards — and that intended for Bombay could be shipped on large 
boats, and thence sent down the river to be embarked on large 
ships. This, Gentlemen, will shew you what a noble and honorable, 
and far-seeing politician, and real statesman, Lord EUenborough was 



APPENDIX. 



xlvii 



— there was no chicanery or humbugging in any of Ins designs. 
However, as I was saying before, Lord Ellenborough ordered me to 
build the depot, and of course I was very willing to do it. I selected 
and marked out a spot for this purpose in Sukkur, and I believe it is 
there to this day (cheering), and by the bye, as we are here, I may 
as well tell you Mr. Frere, (turning round to that gentleman) that 
the ground I selected is within the cantonments of Sukkur, and 
that you can therefore have nothing to do with it (much laughter.) 
(Mr. Frere made a short rejoinder which we did not hear.) Well, 
selecting a spot of ground and building a depot were different things : 
when it came to building I found I had to refer to the Military 
Board, to the Governor General, the Supreme Council, God be 
praised I have got rid of that Council, and so the work has never 
been done. But I mention all these facts as a proof of the foresight 
of Lord Ellenborough. However, I must not make a long speech, 
as some people think a long speech, particularly after dinner, a great 
bore (laughter) and so, Gentlemen, I thank you all once again. 

At Bombay. 

Speech to the Highlanders on the Apollo Pier, 28th January, 
1851. — "Men of the 78th ! It is a great pleasure to me that you, 
Her Majesty's Highland Regiment, should have been selected to 
receive me here on this quay. 

" Men ! I have not had the pleasure of seeing you since you suffer- 
ed so fearfully at Sukkur ; and, consequently, I have never had an op- 
portunity of telling you publicly, and to your faces, than an infamous 
falsehood was propagated respecting your march to Sukkur by the 
lying papers of India. 

" The papers of India stated that I ordered you to march to Sukkur 
at the most unhealthy season of the year. That was an infamous 
lie, men of the 78th ! ! 

" I marched you at a healthy season of the year,* and when the 
fever attacked you, you were in Barracks ; and the proof of it is, 

* The 78th left Kurrachee by wiDgs late in August and early in 
September 1844, and arrived at Sukkur early in October. — Compiler, 



xlviii 



APPENDIX 



that the European Artillery who did not quit their Barracks — who 
had never marched at all, and who had been two years stationed at 
Bombay, — the European Artillery, I say, were more unhealthy than 
you were, men of the 78th Highlanders ! ! 

" I tell you, men, — I tell you on your parade," and here the General 
threw his hands together with a most expressive gesture, that this is 
an infamous — a damnable — a worse than damnable lie ! " And I 
wish and request you all to tell your comrades what I say. 

" I saw you embark at Sukkur, and the state you were then in was 
enough to break any soldier's heart ; but the low, lying papers of 
India never broke my heart ; and they never will, and they may all 
go to * * * * !" Saying which, Sir Charles gave a significant 
shake of his head, indicative of the word which he would not utter. — 
Bombay Telegraph, January 29, 1851. 

Anecdote. — The following anecdote well illustrates the tenacity 
of Sir Charles Napier's memory, and his Napoleon-like facility of 
rendering it the means of endearing himself to those who have 
served under him. On proceeding from the Apollo Pier, after his 
somewhat warm address to the Highlanders on the subject of their 
sickness in 1845, he observed half along the Esplanade a horse 
artillery man in the crowd, on whom his eagle eye was instantly 
rivetted : it rested on the man but a moment, when he stepped out 
and grasped him by the hand, and exclaimed — " Delany, I am 
delighted to see you. How have you been since we met last. 
How is your wife and dear little boy ? To what troop do you 
belong ?" The man having answered these questions as quickly as 
possible, stating that he had some years since volunteered from the 
Queen's service into that of the Company, said — " Sir, I thought 
my heart would have leaped to my mouth as I saw you land." Sir 
Charles, addressing those nearest him, said — " Gentlemen, this fine 
fellow belonged to H. M.'s 22nd, and was my hugler at Meanee ; 
and when 1 had roared myself hoarse, and almost speechless, wound 
many a cheering blast, such as a sound-hearted soldier in the hour 
of danger knows how to send forth to his comrades in arms." We 



APPENDIX. 



give this on the authority of an officer close by him : if the gallant 
veteran knew how much greater pleasure it afforded the newspapers 
to publish such things as redounded to his fame than to dwell on the 
opposite, he might think differently of them. — Bombay Times, 
February 3, 1851. 

Farewell Entertainment, Zlst January 1851. — The Dinner 
at the Byculla Club given in honor of Sir C. Napier, to which 
we have had frequent occasion of late to allude, took place on 
Friday night. The light company of the 8th N. I., under com- 
mand of Captain Ashburner and Lieutenant Beville, were drawn 
up as a guard of honor at the portico. Most of the men wore 
the Scinde Medal, having distinguished themselves at Dubba. Sir 
Charles at once recognized them, and addressed a few words of 
compliment, which he desired the officers to interpret to the men. 
There were about a hundred gentlemen present. 

The large dining room of the Club is 75 feet by 45 — the tables were 
arranged in the form of the letter U. The room was magnificently 
lighted up, and the whole arrangements were well nigh perfect. In 
the large new verandah, into which the dining room opens, in the 
direction of the race-course, we observed a considerable number of 
ladies who seemed to have slipped in after dinner to hear the 
speeches. 

Sir Charles arrived punctually at the time appointed, — half past 
seven, — and was received by Sir W. Yardley, Brigadier Wyllie, 
Dr. Downes, Secretary to the Club, and the other members of 
Committee, by whom he was conducted into the large room formerly 
used as a dining room, now used as a reading room and supper 
room for the Club. He seemed at once to recognise almost every 
one he had ever met before, and cordially shook by the hand those 
of his former friends who were able to reach him through the 
multitude. Sir W. Yardley presided : on his right sat the guest of 
the evening, Sir C. Napier, and next to him the Chief Justice, Sir E. 
Perry, Mr. Pringle, late Commissioner in Scinde, &c, and on the 
left of the Chairman Mr. J, Warden, Sudder Adawlut, &c. 



I 



APPEND] X. 



Brigadier Wyllie acted as Croupier. The dinner was got up in 
the style of perfection which characterises all the entertainments given 
at the Club. The Garrison Band were present on the occasion. 

The cloth having been removed, and the customary toasts disposed 
of, the Chairman, Sir W. Yardley, rose to give the toast of the day : — 

" Colonel Wyllie and Gentlemen — In rising to propose the toast 
of the evening I feel it incumbent on me to state that I do not feel 
myself able to do justice to the illustrious individual who sits on my 
right. It is unnecessary for me to allude to all the glorious actions 
he has performed, they are registered in the page of history : it is 
unnecessary for me to prove that he is a great soldier, there is no 
spot on the civilized globe where his merits as a soldier are not ap- 
preciated, and no where are they better appreciated than in Bombay, 
whose army he has so often so gloriously led — (great cheers.) We 
have here the Conqueror of Scinde, the leader of a small body of 
men hardly to be called an army, but who, led on by such a General, 
were always victorious. Such glorious conquests effected by means 
so small makes the victory seem more stupendous. We turn from 
the General in the field to the Governor in Council — and we there 
see Sir Charles ruling the country he had conquered with humanity 
and wisdom. After half a century of labour in the service of his 
country he retired to rest upon the laurels he had so bravely won, 
but scarcely had he reached his native country when a new danger 
occurred, and India seemed again destined to become the theatre of 
a bloody war. Then it was that the eyes of the whole nation turned 
to him as the man to whom they trusted to avert the danger, and 
if ever there was an instance of command having been conferred on 
an individual by the voice of a people, that instance occurred in the 
case of Sir Charles Napier. And, although he had just arrived at 
a happy home, — at the command of his Queen he again came to 
place himself at the head of the army to fight her battles in an un- 
healthy climate. It is indeed true that when he arrived here the 
threatened danger had passed away, but there was still much for 
Sir Charles to do for the Army, and he has done much — more 
perhaps than any Chief the Indian armies ever had, perhaps more 



APPENDIX. 



li 



than they will receive at the hands of any future Chief, — far he it 
from me to disparage either his predecessors or successors, the 
brightness of Sir Charles's glory is not likely to be dimmed by 
comparison with the glory of ANY other — and now that Sir Charles 
is about to return to his native country (I say it without disparage- 
ment to either his predecessor or successor) he returns to the deepest 
regret of every body (great cheers). I do not mean to say there 
are not many officers both able and willing to serve their country by 
commanding the armies of India, but when a man of well known 
ability, character and firmness, who did his duty without swerving, 
as Sir C. Napier did, resigns his appointment, his retirement must 
be followed with regret, Sir Charles has not been an exception to 
the rule : like other great men he has been assailed with vile 
slander and vituperation, but which it is quite unnecessary on his 
part to refute, and indeed Sir Charles has ever been far above the 
shafts of malice or the breath of slander. 

* Though clouds and darkness round his bosom spread, 
Eternal sunshine settles on his head.' 

Sir Charles now retires from the stirring scenes in which he has so 
nobly conducted himself, full of years, but far more full of glory ; 
but although he ceases to take an active part in the affairs of India, 
he no doubt will never cease to watch over the interest of the army 
he so truly loves, and which so warmly returns his affection. I 
hope we never more may be disturbed by wars or rumours of wars, 
but should our country ever again be assailed by her enemies, may 
she always have the sword of a Napier to defend her, and my life 
on it she will not require the pen of a Napier to record her victories 
(great applause.)" 

As soon as the noise of applause had subsided, Sir Charles rose 
to reply — his speech was as follows : 

" Gentlemen, — It is with some difficulty that I rise to thank you 
for the toast which you have just drunk, and the flattering manner 
in which it has been received by you, preceded as it was by one of 
the most eloquent speeches I ever heard. I cannot help feeling myself 
most highly praised, more praised than I deserve to be, and that in 



lil 



APPENDIX. 



the most eloquent language, but you can only have in reply a plain 
speech from a poor soldier, who passing here on his way home, was 
quite unprepared for the high honor you have done him. I see here 
as well as Soldiers not a few Civilians. I am supposed to be an 
enemy to the Civilians in this country — such is not the case — this 
was ever far below me. Gentlemen, you must allow me large 
latitude this evening, for so help me God I did not know what I 
was to say before I stood up. Sir William Yardley has praised me 
far beyond anything to which I can lay claims, but there is one 
point in which he has not gone farther than he ought — in saying 
that I would not feel hurt at being succeeded by Lord Gough. 
Lord Gough I venerate as a soldier, and there is no nobler heart 
than that which beats in the bosom of Lord Gough. Sir William 
Yardley heaps upon my shoulders all the glory of the conquest of 
Scinde — that glory I beg to share with the armies of India — if 
something was due to me for arrangement, much was due to the 
soldiers who fought. Here I see Whittlie, Leeson, Wyllie, and 
dozens of others I could point out around me ; and there is the 
brave Bengal 9th and the hardy little corps of Madras Sappers. I 
love the armies of all the three Presidencies, and cannot pass any of 
them, but must confess my prejudice to the Bombay Army. I say 
this not to the prejudice of the armies of the other Presidencies. I 
have seen among them soldiers as staunch as could any where be 
found, but I first served with the Bombay Army, and I love it 
most. I am now seventy years old, and I am afraid become a 
little prosy, ha ! — but you must forgive an old soldier. In Bombay 
you have good qualities, but you are inclined to hide them. There is 
a brave and gallant soldier who rose from the ranks, now at this table. 
He was the first to plant the British Colors on the walls of Mooltan. 
But regulation, that thing above all others curst, prevents that gallant 
soldier from sharing in the benefits of a fund, which, in case of his 
death, would place his widow above the reach of want, — Gentlemen, 

THAT REGULATION OUGHT TO BE BROKEN, (great cheering.) 

" I am afraid, Gentlemen, you must submit to a wild rambling 
speech, but vou must have patience with me. There were two or 



APPENDIX, 



liil 



three below me of whom I must speak — I like to come to points 
much better than many of my neighbours do — officers who did more 
for me than I could ever do for them, the first of whom I would 
mention is one who fell — Brown of the Bengal Engineers and Major 
McMurdo, of whom, being nearly related to me, I cannot speak ; 
and there is Meerza Ali Akbar, my Moonshee, who followed me 
through all my battles and was with me in every action, who 
executed all my orders, and without giving him more than his due 
did as much towards the conquest of Scinde as a thousand men. 
This man I find here in Bombay disgraced, without employment, and 
a beggar. I don't wish to find any fault with Government, but this I 
know, that Meerza Ali Khan has had the benefit of no trial, but has 
been condemned unheard. After the conquest of Scinde, again, I 
cannot take to myself all the praise which Sir Wm. Yardley has 
heaped upon me,. I am deeply indebted for assistance in its rule by 
two of the Collectors — there were three of them, but I say two, 
Major Goldney and Major Rathborn. These gentlemen followed 
me in war, but they did more for me in time of peace, and they did 
much to uphold the honor of India in Scinde. The credit of the 
rule of Scinde is due to those gentlemen as well as to me, and to 
them you must give it. I take credit to myself for my zeal to my 
country, and the welfare, honor, and glory of India. I am called 
an enemy to the Directors. No, I am not, but when I am illtreat- 
ed I resist — this is mere independence, independence of spirit, which, 
old as 1 am, I hope I may carry to the grave with me. Fifty-seven 
years ago I received my Commission : I received it with all the 
thoughtless joy a boy could feel, and now I stand here an old soldier 
of seventy. I have never felt real anger with anybody, sometimes 
indeed I have felt anger for a moment, and I have often wished for 
a good broomstick, and to have been within three yards of the object 
of them. Every one has his little peculiarities and I'll not hide 
mine. I turn to the interests of Bombay. Scinde has been con- 
quered, no matter how, or when, or for what reason — it has been 
conquered, and when I rode through Scinde the other day I saw 
whole seas of grain. I am not much of a farmer, but I know the 

h 



liv 



A P P L N D I X. 



difference between wheat and barley — but there were others with me 
who were practical men, and who assured me that the riches of that 
soil were almost boundless ? Your steamers can go right away up 
the Northwest Provinces to Lahore and numberless other places up 
there, and will eventually bring down the whole riches of that part of 
India to enrich Bombay. I met a little man named Arratoon, he was 
a little man, like one of those small steam tugs, small to look at, but 
of tremendous power. This Arratoon told me that he had felled a 
quantity of the most splendid timber up there, it was of a very fine 
kind, and of the finest growth, and all that Arratoon wanted to bring 
this splendid timber to your Bombay Dockyard was the assistance 
of Government to protect it on the way down and prevent its being 
plundered by rajahs and robbers on the way. Well, Arratoon applied 
to the Marquis Dalhousie for protection, but he was asked to prove 
that he had the means of bringing it down ? What had Government 
to do with means ? Is it not enough for it to let every one look after 
his own means. I am not much of a politician, but I know that 
trade must be fostered by Government in the first instance that it may 
be able to support Government in the second. But this is not much to 
the purpose. We know there is produce were it only brought down, 
and then we should see Bombay enriched with all the riches of the 
Northwest. Bombay, from its locality, from its being the nearest of 
any of the Presidencies to England, will soon beat Calcutta in gran- 
deur. And there is Kurrachee, which, when I left a short time ago, 
had only some five thousand inhabitants, when I saw it the other 
day had twenty-five thousand inhabitants : this is by reason of the 
conquest of Scinde, and on account of the conquest of Scinde Bom- 
bay will soon be the capital of India. Gentlemen, I will not tire 
you any more, but again thank you for your great kindness, and I 
beg to assure you that whatever I may have done for the good of 
India, has been all in my power (immense applause)." 

After a short pause Sir Charles again rose and spoke as follows : 
" Gentlemen, — I again rise unprepared with any speech, but the 
toast I am now about to propose does not require that I should have 
come here prepared with any speech to recommend it. I am going 



APPENDIX. 



lv 



to give you " The Indian Army." When I came out here I thought 
I was to have been Commander in Chief, but I was mistaken, — yes, 
Gentlemen, egregiously mistaken. I found that I was merely a sort 
of monster adjutant, — nor even as a monster adjutant complete, but 
like a half caste bullock, neither one thing nor t'other. Gentlemen, I 
do not believe that any one of the Commanders in Chief, who went 
before me knew exactly what they came out to do, and I'll tell you- 
what is more. Gentlemen, by God I don't exactly know myself. 
Here with your regulars, and irregulars, your rangers, your Bheel 
corps, and I don't know what else, you have an army of four hundred 
thousand men who are fit for anything. Where a British officer 
leads, you will ever find the black sepoy follow. In that pass where 
not a shot should have been fired, I saw the noble sepoys covering 
their officers and carrying off the wounded and the fallen. I never 
think of the sepoy without admiration, nor of the Bombay 2oth with- 
out affection. The troops of India are I think equal to almost any 
troops, indeed I think there is no difference between them and our 
own British troops ; but Gentlemen, it is my opinion that they have 
not enough of officers. Give them enough of British officers, and 
they are a match for any army in the world. (Applause.) 

Brigadier Wyllie rose and returned thanks for the toast which had 
just been drank : 

" Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen, — As the senior officer of 
the Indian army present on this great occasion, I beg to return the 
illustrious General our warmest and heartfelt thanks for the great 
honor he has done us in drinking our healths, as well as for the 
highly flattering manner in which he has done it. I was not pre- 
pared to get up on this occasion, and sincerely do I regret that it has 
not devolved on some more able individual of the Indian army, to 
which I have the honor to belong, than myself, to return thanks on 
this occasion ; but this I will say, that no one belonging to that 
army more fully appreciates the honor that has been conferred upon 
us than I do. Such a speech, and from such a man as Sir Charles 
Napier, is praise indeed. And I can say for myself, from my heart, 
that I shall ever glory in having served under such a distinguished 



Ivi 



APPENDIX. 



General, — a General, one and all of us, I believe, have often said, to 
be led by whom, and we could not fail to be successful." 

A pause of some minutes here occurred, when Sir E. Perry rose 
and thus spoke : 

" Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen, — I now have the honor to call 
your attention to a different class of topics than that which has hitherto 
occupied your attention, — I now have to present to you Sir Charles 
Napier in domestic life. We have had him presented to us, in all the 
active and exciting scenes of warfare, but those scenes are now 
over, and I am glad to think that they are so. I would now call 
upon the husbands, those of them who can boast the incomparable 
blessing of a good wife. I am a thorough Civilian, I love the vic- 
tories of peace : the sword which has done such good service I 
should rejoice to see hung up in glorious rust. I have for many 
years past watched closely every action of Sir Charles Napier's, but 
the last deed which has come to my notice, his speech of this even- 
ing, has endeared him to me as a man, as I already honored him as 
a General. That a man like him should have enemies, and should 
be spoken ill of, is natural, such is the characteristic of genius. I 
would turn your attention to that part of his speech in which he so 
touchingly alludes to the wife of an officer present, one who has 
made himself noble by his deeds, but the partner of whose bosom 
would, should he be cut off in the service of his country, be unable 
to share the privileges of the widow of a brother officer, but would 
be left to sink into the depths of penury and want (cries of " Never.") 
Sir Charles points out to us that this should be remedied; you see 
we cannot be in the company of a man of genius for five or ten 
minutes without his teaching us something. And the contradiction 
that he has been fighting with the civil authorities was such as to 
entitle Sir Charles not only to the title of a good British Soldier, 
but to the higher and greater one of a good British Citizen. Sir 
Charles has shewn that he has not only conquered Scinde, but 
accomplished the subordination of mind which gives so much the lie to 
all that has been said against him. I beg to propose the health of 
the distinguished lady who makes him happy and calls him hers. 



APPENDIX. 



Ivii 



Scarcely any woman could have parted so sadly with a husband as 
she did with him (turning to the ladies.) And now, as there may 
perhaps he some here who have an interest, nothing could have in- 
duced Sir Charles to part with his wife, but that all eyes were turned 
to him as the only one to save." 
Sir Charles in reply said — 

" Gentlemen,— Before I say anything in reply to this very hand- 
some speech of Sir E. Perry's, I shoidd like to know how many of 
the Gentlemen present are married. I know my friend here (pointing 
to Sir E. P.) is not married. I was going to say, I wish my wife 
were here, but I don't wish her here, for I am going home to her. 
When I came out here I thought I came for war, and you cannot 
make war and have a wife and family with you : as it was, I found 
that I came for peace. I wish I had a woman's tongue, and I'd 
talk to you all night. In cases such as this, one cannot speak all 
that one feels ; domestic affection is best known in domestic circles. 
I cannot speak of my wife as perhaps I would, and it is as well, for 
a woman's wish to remain unknown is one of their characteristics. I 
thank you for the honor you have done my wife, for whom I feel all 
the affection a husband can." 

In a few minutes Sir Charles again rose and thus proposed The 
Ladies of Bombay — 

" Gentlemen, — It falls to my good fortune (come fill your glasses) 
— you see I am always fortunate, I always fall on my feet. I beg- 
to propose the health of a lady who by her rank, beauty, attractive 
qualities, and agreeable conversation, is so admirably fitted to be, as 
she is, at the head of the Society of Bombay, and of those ladies 
whom it is the pride of Civilians and Soldiers to devote themselves 
to, to admire and to love." 

Sir Charles had scarcely been seated a minute before he again 
rose to propose the health of the Chairman thus : 

" I see I have silenced the whole body of you. As the ladies 
won't speak I shall, (come fill up) I don't think I can give you any 
speech : I feel so flattered, however, it is with very delightful feel- 
ings that I now rise to propose the health of your Chairman. I am 



Iviii 



A r P K N I) I X. 



afraid to speak in his praise for fear of being accused of wishing to 
bestow on him some of the praise with which in such eloquent lan- 
guage he has so lavishly covered me. Every one join me in drink- 
ing the health of your Chairman." 
Sir W. Yardley thus replied — 

" Colonel Wvllie — from no man living could I have received the 
same honor which I have just received at the hands of Sir Charles 
Napier. When we have with us the greatest General we have ever 
had, or probably ever will have, amongst us, the chair would cer- 
tainly have been better filled by Sir E. Perry or some other my 
senior in rank and more able than myself — the reason for my having 
been chosen was, when it was proposed to give a dinner in honor of 
Sir Charles, the rumour somehow got abroad that I was to take the 
chair. When we met, I was asked to preside, and now, Gentlemen, 
I have to thank you most sincerely for the honor you have 
done me." 

The Gentlemen rose from the table at a quarter to twelve. — 
Bombay Times, February 3, 1851. 

Embarkation for Europe. — Sir Charles Napier has quitted these 
shores and no doubt for ever. All the Troops in Garrison paraded in 
review order at half past 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon and formed 
line on the Esplanade road from the Apollo Bunder towards the 
Wellesley Statue, the whole forming a street of some considerable 
length. A company from II. M.'s 78th Highlanders, with the Gar- 
rison Band, formed on the Apollo Bunder facing the landing place as 
a Guard of Honor. 

Lady Falkland, accompanied by the Hon'ble Captain FitzClarence, 
the Hon'ble Sir Erskine Perry, the Hon'ble Sir William and Lady 
Yardley, the Venerable the Archdeacon, together with a great num- 
ber of other Ladies and nearly all the principal members of Society, 
European and Native, assembled on the Pier Head to witness the 
departure of the renowned warrior. The concourse of spectators of 
other classes of the community was immense, and the desire to do 
the retiring General all honor seemed to be universal. 



APPENDIX. 



lix 



After 5 o'clock the gallant veteran in an undress blue coat came 
galloping down the line, each corps presented arms as His Excellen- 
cy came up, and received in return the General's acknowledgment 
by repeated waving of the hand. His Excellency did not at first 
seem to be aware of Lady Falkland's presence, and it was not until 
after he dismounted at the Pier Head that he was made acquainted 
with it. The General immediately walked back to Her Ladyship's 
carriage, and after a short conversation took leave of Her Ladyship 
most cordially. He then proceeded towards the Bunder and in 
passing shook hands with several of the ladies present, and Jenkins 
says, actually kissed a few of them ! His Excellency was accompa- 
nied in the Governor's barge to the steamer by many ladies, and 
Sir William Yardley, Captain French, L. C. C. Rivett, Esq., and 
Captain Baynes. On stepping into the boat His Excellency was 
warmly cheered by the assembled multitude. The saluting battery 
then boomed forth the usual salute, and no sooner was this over than 
at the suggestion of Colonel Hale, another, and if possible a still 
louder and more general, cheer succeeded, which was warmly returned 
by the party on board with His Excellency. Immediately after the 
boat had passed the Honorable Company's ship the Hastings, a 
salute was fired from her guns, and several of the merchant vessels 
followed her example. The shipping in the harbour presented a 
beautiful sight, being all decorated and dressed out in their flags 
and best colours. The demonstration of respect and esteem for the 
distinguished General was complete and universal, and must have 
been most gratifying to his feelings. — Bombay Gazette, February 
4, 1851. 



W. PALMER, BENGAL MILITARY ORPHAN PRESS. 



INDEX. 



Courts Martial. 

European Commissioned Officers. 

Page. 

Major *Bartleman, John, 44th N. I., 212 

„ *Cooke, Thomas, 17th N. I., 46 

„ fPhillips, B. T., 7th Light Cavalry, 170 

Captain ff Brine, A. G., H. M. 32nd Foot, 154 

„ DaCosta, L. G., 58th N. L, 56 

„ Daniell, J. T., 47th N. I., 99 

„ *Fagan, C. G., 8th Light Cavalry, (see Appendix p. 33 J 128 

„ Hasell, C, 48th N. I., Ill 

„ *Hollings, W. C, 47th K I., 108 

„ Houstoun, H. J., 2nd Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 125 

„ Mackenzie, Hugh, „ „ „ „ 53 

„ Turton, John, 3rd N". I., 38 



* Cashiered or dismissed. t Acquitted, 

tt Captain Brine was again tried by General Court Martial at Jullunder on the 25th 
October 1850, and sentenced to be cashiered, but the results were not published, Sir 
Charles Napier having referred the proceedings, confirmed and approved by him, to the 
Commander in Chief of Her Majesty's Forces. In Gr. O. 15th March 1851, it is announced 
that Captain Brine has received Her Majesty's pardon and been restored to the service, 
with a view to his being placed upon the half pay list on his arrival in England, whither he 
is directed to proceed. 

b 



Page. 

Lieutenant *Ashton, G. J., H. M. 53rd Foot, ( see Appendix p. 20. ) 35 

„ Baldwin, John, H. M. 22nd Foot, 169 

*Bradford, E. O., Artillery, 150 

„ *Cookson, E., 68th N. L, 85 

DeMole, F. V., 2nd Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 22 

Eccles, J. W., „ „ „ „ 22 

English, A. P., 22nd N. I., 53 

„ Fanshawe, R. F., Invalid Establishment, 215 

„ t Goodrid S e > E - J » Artillery, 177 

Holland, G., „ 153 

Latter, T., 67th N. I., 122 

*Litchford, E. B., 48th N. I., 186 

Mayne, W., H. M. 22nd Foot, 1G9 

*Morphett, J., H. M. 53rd Foot, 71 

Norton, R. B., 35th N. I., 23 

*Parker, H. F. H., H. M. 53rd Foot, 3G 

Penneftther, H. V., H. M. 22nd Foot, 169 

*Pulman, T. W., Artillery, 50 

„ JRenny, Robert, 47th N. I., 110 

„ Rose, Hugh, 3rd N. I., 173 

„ *Smith, G. S., 48th N. I., 189 

•j-Tayior, J - E - H > H - M - 10th Foot > 59 

„ Tottenham, F. R., 7th Light Cavalry, 56 

*Walmisley, P. M., 16th N. I., 69 

2nd Lieutenant *Farnden, H. R., H. M. 60th Rifles, 34 

„ „ Lillingston, C. W. P., H. M. 60th Rifles, 169 

Cornet ^Bennett, J. D., H. M. 3rd Light Dragoons, 61 

Ensign *Coombe, M. H., 45th N. I., ' 43 

TfDagg, C. H., H. M. 98th Foot, 168 

*Hankey, W. H., 38th N. I., 16 

*IIunter, E., 24th N. I., 208 

f Huxham, G. C, 48th N. I., 187 

Sandham, Edgar, 11th N. I., 190 

*Seale, C. T., H. M. 94th Foot, 197 

* White, T. W., 48th N. I., 188 



* Cashiered or dismissed, 
t Acquitted. 



\ C. in C. refused to reprimand. 
T Pardoned. 



INDEX. 



iii 



Page. 

Surgeon *Butter, Donald, M. D., 131 

Asst. Surgeon §Edlin, Edward, M. D. (see Appendix p. 33J ... 21 
* Kennedy, E. J., M. D., H. M. 64th Foot, 182 



European Non- Commissioned Officers. 

Page. 

Sergeant Major ^[Johnson, C, Garrison, Chunar, 29 

Drill Sergeant ^[Stokes, John, 2nd Brigade Horse Artillery, 9 

Assist. Farrier and Saddler Sergeant McKeon, Joseph, Artillery, 199 
Sergeant Bird, John, 2nd Troop 1st Brigade Horse Artillery, 220 

„ Buttress, John, Sappers and Pioneers, 117 

„ f Hind, G., Invalid Establishment, 30 

„ Scully, James, H. M. 98th Foot, 164 

Corporal fHogan, John, 3rd Company 2nd Battalion Artillery, 136 



European Private Soldiers. 

Page. 

Gunner Baker, W., 3rd Company 2nd Battalion Artillery, ... 224 
„ Brown, W., 1st Troop 2nd Brigade ... „ 27 



„ t clia f e r! H., 3rd Company 5th Battalion, „ 220 

„ Collins, Pat., 3rd „ 2nd „ „ 144 

„ Fardy, James, 3rd „ 2nd „ „ 135 

„ Fitzpatrick, James, 3rd „ 4th „ „ 45 

„ \ JField, Charles, 1st „ 3rd „ „ 133 

„ fGaffiiay, Pat, 1st Troop 3rd Brigade „ 136 

„ jJGibbs, Rob., 1st Company 3rd Battalion „ 206 

Green, T., 4th „ 5th „ „ 107 

„ Howe, Jer., 2nd „ 2nd „ „ 215 

„ Hynes, John, 3rd „ 2nd „ „ ... 135, 144 

„ JJMajor H., 1st Troop 2nd Brigade „ 20 

„ McAllen, Charles, 1st Co. 5th „ „ 163 

„ Mclnnis, Hugh, 3rd „ 1st „ „ 93 

„ f Power, Pat., 1st „ 5th „ „ 136 

„ Scanlan, John, 4th „ 3rd „ „ 100 

„ Weeks, James, 3rd „ 2nd „ „ 135 



* Cashiered or dismissed, 
t Acquitted. 



%% Punishment mitigated by Q. in C. 
§ Suspension cancelled by C. in C. 



IV 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Private Andrews, George, 2nd Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 219 

„ §§Banks, Thomas, H. M. 75th Foot, 137 

„ Blake, Charles, H. M. 18th Foot, 152 

„ fBloomfield, John, 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 43 

„ Brady, Jer., H. M. 32nd Foot, 161 

„ JJBuckley, Barth., 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 27 

„ +}Burns, John, H. M. 9th Lancers, 214 

„ Carter, George, H. M. 70th Foot, 151 

„ Chamberlain, John, H. M. 14th Lt. Drags., 210 

„ fClarke, John, 2nd Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 185 

„ JjConnors, John, H. M. 18th Foot, 210 

„ Creane, John, „ „ 124 

„ Donovan, Tim., „ „ 157 

„ Doyle, Pat., „ „ 171 

„ Dugleby, John, H. M. 14th Lt. Drags, 163, 172 

„ Everett, Rich., H. M. 96th Foot, 199 

„ Fallows, Aaron, H. M. 70th Foot, 126 

„ Finan, Thomas, H. M. 22nd Foot, 160 

„ JJGeraghty, Rich., 2nd Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 164 

„ Goodsell, Hezekiah, H. M. 3rd Lt. Drags., 46 

„ Griffith, Rees, 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 28 

„ Grove, H., H. M. 70th Foot, 20 

„ Hafner, W., H. M. 24th Foot, 225 

„ JJHanley, John, H. M. 98th Foot, 180 

„ ++Hughes, Michael, H. M. 32nd Foot, 148 

„ \\ Jamieson, Rob., 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 42 

„ Kelly, Michael, H. M. 61st Foot, 37 

„ fKennedy, Michael, H. M. 18th Foot, 93 

„ j+Kettlewell, J. H. „ „ 204 

„ Lavery, John, 2nd Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 156 

„ McAteer, Owen, H. M. 29th Foot, 14 

„ McClelland, Pat., H.M. 18th Foot, 152 

„ jJMcCormick, John, H. M. 29th Foot, 172 

„ §§McLean, John, H. M. 14th Lt. Drags., 158 

„ ^[McKenzie, W., 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 



t Acquitted. 1 Pardoned. 

XX Punishment mitigated by C. in C. §§ Proceedings not confirmed. 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Private McNamara, Lawrence, H. M. 80th Foot, 73 

„ McTeague, T., H. M. 9th Lancers, 80 

„ fMackay, James, 2nd Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 185 

„ MaUon, E., H. M. 29th Foot, 156 

„ Mortimer, Jos., H. M. 3rd Lt. Drags., ... Ill 

„ Mossman, B. A., 1st Bombay Eur. Regt., 38 

„ Murphy, Dennis, 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 45 

„ „ James, H. M. 10th Foot, 44 

„ „ John, H. M. 70th Foot, .-209 

„ jJNeal, James, H. M. 29th Foot, 179 

„ Oakley, Rich., H. M. 3rd Lt. Drags., 44 

„ fO'Brien, Michael, 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers,.. 43 

„ IjO'Neil, James, H. M. 61st Foot, 36 

: „ UPage, Charles, H. M. 60th Rifles, 207 

„ jJSallone, T., H. M. 9th Lancers, 75 

„ f Sheehan, Michael, H. M. 18th Foot, 94 

„ J jSmyth, James, 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 42 

„ Springett, John, H. M. 14th Lt. Drags., 155 

„ Sweeney, Michael, H. M. 70th Foot, 126 

„ Thomas, George, 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 91 

„ Thompson, W., H. M. 80th Foot, 41 

„ Tongue, James, H. M. 29th Foot, 211 

„ JjTredger, Rob., 1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, 12 

„ fWalley, T., H. M. 60th Rifles, 8 

„ Walsh, John, H. M. 80th Foot, 226 

„ Webb, George, H. M. 10th Foot, 151 

„ Young, James, H. M. 80th Foot, 133 

Native Commissioned Officers. 

Page. 

Subadar Asghur Ally, 1st Seikh Local Infantry, 157 

„ *Davedeen Opudhya, 13th 2ST. I., 66 

„ *Hewunchul Patuck, 22nd N. I., 76 

„ *Juswunt Sing, 1st Seikh Local Infantry, 148 



* Cashiered or dismissed, 
t Acquited. 

XX Punishment mitigated by C. in C. 



Vi ISDE X. 

Page. 

Subadar Narain Misser, 15th N. I., 184 

„ fSewdeen Awustee, 22nd N. I., 77 

Shaik Ahmed, 61st N. I., 73 

„ *Shaik Madar Buksh, 66th N. I., 120 

„ Soobah Sing, 1st Seikh Local Infantry, 205 

Jemadar *Bhowanee Lalla, 22nd N. I., 107 

„ | Budlo ° Pandy, 64th N. I., 178 

„ ++Gunga Singh, 66th N. I., 121 

„ JJJehangheer Khan, 7th N. I., 160 

„ ^[Jehangheer Khan, 16th Irregular Cavalry, 193 

Needha Sing, 41st N. I., 144 

„ IfPhyoo Khan, 2nd Seikh Local Infantry, 228 

Ram Sing, 22nd N. I., 77 

„ fRuggonath Sing, 1st Seikh Local Infantry, 162 

„ +JShaik Golam Hossein, 32nd N. L, 83 

„ Shaik Golam Russool, 12th Irregular Cavalry, , 54 

„ Shaik Roshun, 70th N. I., 21 

Rcssaldar *Gunness Sing, 18th Irregular Cavalry, 7 

„ jjlsfundiar Khan, 16th Irregular Cavalry, 192 

„ *Meer Syud Khan, 13th Irregular Cavalry, 92 

„ *Mirza Ameer Beg, 5th Irregular Cavalry, 92 

Restiaidar ^[Khodayar Khan, 5 th Irregular Cavalry, 221 

„ * Yussuff Ally, 16th Irregular Cavalry, 153 

Native Doctor *Gholam Mahomed Khan, 7th N. I., 117 

Native Non- Commissioned Officers. 

Page. 

Havildar ++Abilock Sing, 65th IS. I, 18 

„ (Pay) §§Boabul Pande, 13th N. I., 67 

„ *Gungapersaud Pande, 64th N. I., 179 

„ |Byjnath Tewarree, (No. 56,) 22nd N. I., 78 

„ *Byjnath Tewarree, (No. 72,) 22nd N. I., 78 

§§Mokhum Pande, 13th N. I., 68 

„ (Pay) *Runjeet Sing, 32nd N. I., t 81 

„ Shaik Kurrimbux, Calcutta Native Militia, 202 



* Cashiered or dismissed, 
t Acquitted. 



XX Punishment mitigated by C. in C. 
§§ Proceedings not confirmed. 
■" Pardoned. 



I > D E X. 



V1L 



Page. 

Havildar ^Sewcliurn Opudhia, 65th N. I., 31 

Naick ++Goolaub Doobey, 54tk N. I., ,..195 

Duffadar jjSuminund Khan, 1st Irregular Cavalry, 203 

Kote Duffadar *Syud Auieer Khan, 12th Irregular Cavalry, ... 93 



Native Private Soldiers. 

Page. 

Sepoy Adjoodhea Pershaud, (alias Nubbee Bux,) 41st N. I., ... 161 

„ Davy Sing, 44th N. I., ..." 173 

„ ++Duhnust Khan, 32nd N. I., 87 

„ jJGirwar Sing, 55th N. I., 19 

„ JJGoordoss, 2nd Seikh Local Infantry, 229 

., JJGoordial Sing, 60th N. I., 143 

„ JjHemnarain Sing, 32nd N. I., 87 

jiHunnooman Sing, 65th N. I., 19 

„ flssra Sing, 2nd Seikh Local Infantry, 229 

„ X\ Jalim Sing, 31st N. I., 45 

„ JJJerbundhun Sing, 61st N. I., 32 

„ Mutineers of the 22nd N. I., 78 

„ fNeezam Deen, 1st Seikh Local Infantry, 162 

„ UNowrung, 32nd 91 

„ ++Omrao LoU, 7th N. I., 10 

„ Omrao Sing, 5th N. I., 113 

„ fRahim Bux, 1st Seikh Local Infantry, 162 

„ +JRam Sohaie Misr, 32nd N. I., 91 

„ Sewram, 51st N". I., 10 

„ |JShaick Fucqueera Bux, 32nd 1ST. I., 87 

„ f Siddoo Sing, 1st Seikh Local Infantry, 162 

Sowar Goolam Allie, 12th Lregular Cavalry, 32 

„ Kullender Buksh, 12th Lregular Cavalry, 32 

Drummer, Pursun, 10th N". I., 75 

Camp Follower, Dabiedeen, 55 

„ „ Meer Rujub Allie, 84 

„ „ ^[Sheobuksh, 29 



* Cashiered or dismissed, 
t Acquitted. 



tt Punishment mitigated by C. in C. 
% Pardoned. 



viii 



INDEX. 



Courts Martial — Arranged Regimentally. 





Page. 


H. M. 3rd Lt. Drags. ^Cornet Bennett, J. D., 


61 


„ „ Private Oakley, Rich., 


44 


„ „ „ Goodsell, Hez., 


46 


„ „ „ Mortimer, Jos., 


Ill 


H. M. 9th Lancers, Private J jBurns, John, 


214 


„ „ „ McTeague, T., 


80 


„ JJSallone, T., 


75 


H. M. 14th Drags. „ Chamberlain, John, ... 


210 


„ „ „ Dugleby, John, ... ... 


... 167 172 


„ „ „ §§McLean, John, 


158 


„ „ „ Springett, John, 


155 


H. M. 10th Foot, Lieut. fTaylor, J. E. H., 


59 


„ Private Murphy, Jas., 


44 


„ » Webb, George, 


151 


H. M. 18th Foot, „ Blake, Charles, 


152 


„ „ Connors, John, 


210 


„ „ Creane, John, 


124 


,, „ Donovan, Tim., 


157 


Doyle, Pat., 


171 


„ „ fKennedy, Michael, 


93 


„ ++Kettlewell, J. H., 


204 


„ „ McClelland, Pat., 


152 


„ „ Sheehan, Michael, 


94 


H. M. 22nd Foot Lieut. Baldwin, John, 


169 


„ „ Mayne, W., 


169 


„ „ Pennefather, H. V., ... . 


169 


„ Private Finan, Thomas, 


160 


EL M. 24th Foot „ Hafner, W., 


225 


„ „ McAteer, Owen, 


14 


„ „ JJMcCormick, John, 


172 


H. M. 29th Foot „ Mallon, E., 


156 


„ „ jNeal, James, 


179 


„ „ Tongue, James, 


211 


H. M. 32nd Foot, Captain ff Brine, A. G., 


154 


„ Private Brady, Jer., 


161 



t Acquitted. H Pardoned. 

%% Punishment mitigated by C. in C. §§ Proceedings not confirmed. 



INDEX. 



Page. 

H. M. 32nd Foot, Private JJHughes, Mia, 148 

H. M. 53rd Foot, Lieut. *Ashton, G. J., 35 

„ „ *Morphett, J., 71 

„ „ *Parker, H. F. H., 36 

H. M. 60th Rifles, 2nd Lieut. *Farnden, H. R., 34 

Lillingston, C. W. P.„ 169 

„ „ Private JjPage, Charles, 207 

„ tWalley,T, ; 8 

H. M. 61st Foot, Private Kelly, Michael, 37 

„ „ „ JJO'Neil, James, 36 

H. M. 54th Foot, Asst. Surgeon ^Kennedy, E. J., 182 

H. M. 70th Foot, Private Carter, George, 151 

„ „ „ Fallows, Aaron, ... 126 

„ „ „ Grove, H., 20 

„ „ „ Murphy, John, 209 

„ „ „ Sweeney, Michael, 126 

H. M. 75th Foot, Private §§Banks, Thomas, 137 

H. M. 80th „ „ MoNamara, Lawrence, 73 

„ „ „ Thompson, W., 41 

„ „ „ Walsh, John, 226 

„ „ „ Young, James, ... 133 

H. M. 94th Foot, Ensign *Seale, C. T., 197 

H. M. 96th „ Private Everett, Richard, 199 

H. M. 98th „ Ensign TfDagg, C. H., 168 

„ „ Sergeant Scully, James, 164 

„ „ Private JJHanley, John, 180 

1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, Private fBloomfield, John, 43 

„ J+Buckley, B., 27 

„ „ „ Griffith, Rees, 28 

„ „ „ JJJamieson, Robert, 42 

„ „ „ ^[McKenzie, W., 220 

„ „ „ Murphy, Dennis, 45 

„ „ „ t°' Brien » Michael, 43 

„ „ „ JJSmyth, James, 42 

„ „ „ Thomas, George, ... ... ... 91 



* Cashiered or dismissed. %% Punishment mitigated by C, in C' 

t Acquitted. H Pardoned. 

§§ Proceedings not confirmed. 

c 



X 



I N D E X. 



Page. 

1st Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, Private jJTredger, Robert, 12 

2nd Eur. Ben. Fusiliers, Captain Houstoun, II. J., 125 

„ „ „ Mackenzie, Hugh, 53 

„ Lieut. DeMole, F. V., 22 

„ „ „ Eccles, J. W., 22 

„ „ Private Andrews, George, 219 

„ „ „ fClarke, John, 185 

„ „ „ ^Geraghty, Richard, 164 

„ „ „ Lavery, John, 156 

„ „ „ fMaekay, James, ... 185 

1st Bombay Eur. Regt., Private Mossman, B. A., 38 

Sappers and Pioneers, Sergeant Buttress, John, 117 

Artillery, „ Lieut. *Bradford, E. O., 150 

„ „ „ fGoodridge, E. J., 177 

„ „ Holland, G., 153 

„ „ „ *Pulman, T. W., 50 

„ Asst. Farrier and Saddler Sergeant McKeon, Joseph, ... 199 

„ 1 st Brigade, Sergeant Bird, John, ; 220 

„ 2nd Brigade Drill Sergeant ^[Stokes, John, 9 

„ „ Gunner Brown, W., 27 

„ „ „ fGaffnay, Patrick, ... 136 

„ „ „ JtMajor, H., 20 

„ 1st Battalion, „ ++Field, Charles, 133 

„ „ „ Mclnnis, Hugh, 93 



2nd Battalion, Co: 
Gu 



3rd Battalion, 

4th Battalion, 
5th Battalion, 



poral fHogan, John, 136 

tiner Baker, W., 224 

Collins, Patrick, 144 

Fardy, James, 135 

Howe, Jeremiah, 215 

Hynes, John, 135, 144 

Weeks, James, 135 

J+Gibbs, Robert, 206 

Scanlan, John, 100 

Fitzpatrick, James, 45 

fChafer, H., 220 



* Cashiered or dismissed, 
t Acquitted. 



XX Punishment mitigated by C. in C. 
11 Pardoned. 



INDEX. 



xi 



Page. 

Artillery, 5th Battalion, Gunner Green, T., 107 

„ „ „ McAllen, Charles, 163 

„ „ „ Power, Patrick, 136 

Medical Dept., Surgeon *Butter, Donald, M. D., 131 

„ Asst. Surgeon §Edlin, E., M. D., (see Appendix p. 33.) 21 
„ „ *Kennedy, E. J. M. D., H. M. 64th Foot, 182 

Invalid Establishment, Lieut. Fanshawe, Pv. F., 215 



55 55 


Sergeant Major ^[Johnson, C 


29 


55 55 


Sergeant fHind, G 


... 30 


7th Light Cavalry, Major fPhillips, B. T., 


170 


55 55 


Lieut. Tottenham, F. P., 


... 56 


8th Light Cavalry, Captain *Fagan, C. G., (See Appendix p. \ 


}3.) 128 


3rd Native Infantry, Capt. Turton, John, 


38 


55 55 


Lieut. Pose, Hugh, 


... 173 


5th „ 


Sepoy Omrao Sing, 


113 


7th „ 


Jemadar %% Jehangheer Khan, 


... 160 


55 55 


Native Doctor *Gholam Mahomed Khan, ... 


117 




Sepoy JJOmrao Lall, 


... 10 


10th „ 


Drummer Pursun, 


75 


11th „ 


Ensign Sandham, Edgar, 


... 190 


13th „ 


Subadar *Davedeen Opudhya, 


66 




Havildar (Pay) §§Boabul Pande, 


... 67 


55 55 


„ §§Mokhum Pande, 


68 


15th „ 


Subadar Narain Misser, 


... 184 


16th „ 


Lieut. *Walmisley, P. M., 


69 


17th „ 


Major *Cooke, Thomas, 


... 46 


22nd „ 


Lieut. English, A. F., 


53 


55 55 


Subadar fSewdeen A-wustee, 


... 77 


55 55 


„ *Hewunchul Patuck, , 


76 


55 55 


Jemadar Bhowanee Lalla, 


... 107 


55 55 


„ Ram Sing, , 


77 



* Cashiered or dismissed, 
t Acquitted. 

XX Punishment mitigated by C. in C. 



§ Suspension cancelled. 
§§ Proceedings not confirmed. 
If Pardoned. 



xii 



INDEX. 









Page. 


22nd 




.) Havildar j"Byjnath Tewary, (No. 56,) 


... 78 


h 


" 


*Rvinntri Tpwnrv ("Met 72 "i 


78 


»> 


» 


Sepoy IVlutineers, ... •■• ... 


... 78 


24th 


" 


Ensign *Hunter, E., ... ... ... ... 


208 


31st 




Sepoy JJJalim Sing, ... ... .. ... 


... 45 


32nd 


" 


Jemadar [£[j[Shaik Golam Hossein, ... 


83 


M 


55 


Pay Havildar *B»unjeet Sing, ... ... ••• ••■ 


81 


" 


)» 


Sepoy *Dnlni"ust Khan, ■•• ... .«. 


87 


5> 


" 


,, _j |_ iiciiiiiui aiii oiii^, ... •«. ... 


87 


n 


55 


,, JJNcwrung, ... ... ... ... 


91 


" 


55 


,} ^[^I^ani Sohaie JVIisr, ... ... ... 


91 


5> 


" 


,, JJShaik Fucqueera Bux, ... 


87 


36th 


55 


Lieut. Norton, R. B., ... ... ... 


, ... 23 


38th 


" 


Ensign *Hankey, W. H., 


16 


41st 




Jemadar Needha Sing, ... 


. ... 144 




J5 


Sepoy Adjoodhea Pershaud, 


161 


44th 


55 


JNXujor ^"Xjiir 1 1 fjniii li. J>^ ••• ••• •■• •• 


212 


)» 


55 


Sepoy Duvy Sing", BM «,* ••• 


173 


45th 


15 


Ensign. ^Coombsj 1\X« H*? ••• ••• •• 


43 




" 


Vydptdin UttiiiLii. *),!.. ... 

„ *Hollings, W. C, 


QQ 

...... yy 

108 


■ 


55 


Lieut. ^Itenny, Robert, •*• *•• 


110 


48 th 


55 


Contain TTn<;pll f! 


ill 


n 


" 


Jjli. Ul. IjIM. ilH.'i > I. ±U t 1 J , . >t « ••• ••• 


i eft 

160 


J) 


" 


♦Smith n s 


1 89 


" 


55 


Ensign ^[Huxham, G. C, 


...... 104 




55 


„ *White, T. W., 


. ... loo 


51st 


" 


Sepoy Sewram, ... ... ... 


10 


54th 


55 


^Tniflr ^"^rrrinlmiVi "DAnViov 

ii aitu ^.^.vjiuuitiuu iyuvjucyy ... ... ... .i 


i. ... 195 


55th 




Sepoy ^Girwar Sin°", ... ... ... ... 




58th 




Captain DaCosta, L. G., 


56 


60th 


55 


Sepoy JJGoordial Sing, 


143 


61st 


55 


Subadar Shaik Ahmed, 


73 




55 


Sepoy JJJerbundhun Singh, 


32 


64th 


55 


Jemadar fBudloo Pandy, 


178 



* Cashiered or dismissed, 
t Acquitted. 



i C. in C. refused to reprimand. 
tt Punishment mitigated by C. in C. 
1 Pardoned. 



INDEX. 



Page. 

64th N. I., Havildar *Gungapersaud Pandy, 179 

65th „ „ ++Abilock Sing, 18 

„ „ „ T[Sew churn Opudhia, 31 

„ „ Sepoy JJHunnooman Sing, 19 

66th „ Subadar *Sheik Madar Buksh, 120 

„ „ Jemadar JJGunga Singh, 121 

67th „ Lieut. Latter, T., 122 

68th „ „ *Cookson, E., 85 

70th „ Jemadar Shaick Roshun, 21 

Calcutta Native Militia, Havildar Shaick Kurrimbux, 202 

1st Irregular Cavalry, Duffadar ^JSummund Khan, 203 

5th „ Ressaidar *Mirza Ameer Beg, 92 

„ „ Ressaidar ^[Khodayar Khan, «, 221 

12th „ Jemadar Golam Russool, ... 54 

„ „ Kote Duffadar *Syud Ameer Khan, 93 

„ „ Sowar Goolam Allie, 32 

„ „ „ Kullunder Buksh, 32 

13th „ Ressaidar *Meer Syud Khan, 92 

16th „ „ ++Isfundiar Khan, 192 

„ „ Resaidar *Yussuff Ally, 153 

„ „ Jemadar ^[Jehangeer Khan, 192 

18th „ Ressaidar *Gunness Sing, 7 

1st Seikh Local Infantry, Subadar Asghur Ally, 157 

„ „ „ *Juswunt Sing, 148 

„ „ „ Soobah Sing, 205 

„ „ Jemadar fRuggonath Sing, ...... 162 

„ „ Sepoy f Neezam Deen, ] 62 

n » n t R ahim Bux, 162 

55 55 

„ fSiddoo Sing, 162 

2nd „ „ Jemadar ^[Phyoo Khan, 228 

„ „ Sepoy flssra Sing, 229 

)5 55 » JJGoordoss, 229 



* Cashiered or dismissed, 
t Acquitted. 



tt Punishment mitigated by C. in C. 
% Pardoned. 



xiv 



INDEX. 



Camp Follower, Dabietleen, 

„ Meer Rujub Allee, 

„ ^[Sheobuksh, 



Page. 

55 

84 

29 



Miscellaneous Orders. 

Page. 

Assumption of the Command, 1 

Orders on assuming Command, 4 

Previous Convictions, 11 

Payment of Transferred Men, 14 

Regulating Leave of Absence, 38 

Regimental and Company Commands, 40 

Uniform of 1st European Bengal Fusiliers, 40 

Destination of Regiments, 50 

The Review at Meean Meer, 68 

The Civil Courts at Simlah, 70 

Beer versus Rum, 86 

Expedition against the Affreedies, 94 

„ „ „ „ Thanks from Government, ... 116 

Disbanding of the 66th N. I., 101 

Court of Enquiry on Lieutenant A. Barkei', 66th N. L, 106 

Leave to the Hills, 113 

Taking Divisional and Brigade Orders, 118 

Leave on Private Affairs, 119 

Bravery of Shaik Ghoolam Gouse, a Native Doctor, 123 

Barrack Accommodation, 127 

Resignation of Lieut. Col. P. Grant, Adjutant General, 128 

Returns and Reports from Medical Officers, 134 

Promotion Rolls, 147 

On the neglect of certain Commanding Officers to read and ex- 
plain the Orders for the cessation of Scinde Pay, 1 65 

Gambling at Simla, 195 

Supersession of Native Officers, 200 

Evidence of claim to Family Pension, 201 

Farewell Address, 230 



% Pardoned. 



INDEX TO APPENDIX. 

Page. 

Appointment of Sir Charles Napier to succeed Lord Gough, i 
Arrival at Calcutta, ... ... ... ... ... ... ii 

Speech to H. M. 96th in Fort William, iii 

Review at Barrackpore, ... ... ... ... ... v 

Dinner at the Military Club, Calcutta, vi 

Letter to Sergeant Bennet, ... ... ... ... ... viii 

Departure for the North West, x 

Speech to the Free Masons at Simian, xi 

At Delhi, xii 

Presentation of Colors to the 41st N. I. at Delhi, xiii 

At Agra, xv 

Sir Charles Napier and the 14th Dragoons, xviii 

The case of Lieut. G. J. Ashton, H. M. 53rd Foot, xx 

At Peshawar, xxi 

Expedition against the AfFreedies, ... ... ... xxiii 

Mr. Morgan versus Mrs. Rowe, ... ... ... ... xxix 

The case of Dr. Edlin and Captain Fagan, xxxiii 

Cause of Resignation, xxxiv 

Speech on presenting new Colors to H. M. 22nd Foot at -j 

Umballah, \ xxxiv 

At Ferozepore, ... ... ... ... ... xxxix 

At Kurrachee, 

Station Staff Dinner, , xlii 

Speech at 83rd Mess, xlv 

Speech at QAth Mess, ... xlv 

At Bombay, 

Speech to the Highlanders, ... ... ... ... xlvii 

Anecdote, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... xlviii 

Farewell Entertainment, xlix 

Embarkation for Europe, lviii 



ERRATA. 



P. 93, line 8, insert Approved and confirmed. 

P. 145, omit case of Private John Creane, inserted ante p. 124. 

P. 160, for Fiman read Finan. 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

This hook is DUE on the last date stamped helow 



AUG 2 2 1951 1 

FEB 2 4 19fS 

Iji -. . ■ ' 

DEC i m 

DATE SENT 

MAY 1515195 

DUE 3 MONlHi, nu/W 
DATE RECEIVED 




JUL 07 1998 



Form L-B 



um t naiii or cat - hheka 



DS 

477.67 Napier - 

N16r Records of 

the Indian 



huG + 2 1951 1 



3 1158 00389 2246 



DS 

477.67 
N16r